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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had some time with my stanley no. 605 1/2 to rehab and tune but I could not get a good or close fit to the blade no matter what I did. So what I found was the other end that I was using to reference has a belly causing the end to tilt one way on the push and tilt to the other side. Any ideas or helpful tips, yes 80 grit not mutch help.
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Might need to see the blade and chip breaker mounted together from different angles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well I'll need day light to get pic's of the blade and breaker but, the sliver of day light is on bolt sides of the blade. The more I try to close the gaps by working it ( the end ) down the bigger the gaps become.
 

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Old Stanley blades and chip breakers bend easily. Making everything flat is step one of any blade restoration.

What I do:
Carefully hammer the blade and flat portion of the chip breaker perfectly flat, file any rough edges off, then polish smooth with 150/220 grit.
I use a couple of thick steel tool plates, and "coin stamp" the thin metal between the plates. Check with straight edge, and feeler gauges to verify progress.

Once they are both flat, use a metal dowel rod and slowly hammer a consistent curve on flattened chip breaker, creating a smooth, even radius. Exact radius is less important then making it consistent along full length. You want the curved end to extend about 1/8" past the recently flattened back of chip breaker sitting on flat surface. Once radius and side to side height is consistent, then you grind/polish front edge. Want a slight taper; so the chip beaker has knife edge to seal out wood shavings being cut, after it has been clamped to blade.

IME - Over half of all chip breakers I have seen, require a lot of work to tune. At least 10% of all blades/breakers are not salvageable, unless you are a magical metal working genius with automotive body work and enjoy torture, I am neither, so over 1/2 of my planes now have replacement LV PM-11 blades and new LV chip breakers.

YMMV and Best Luck.
 

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Hmmmm.....Related to "Flat World"?
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Stanley No. 4-1/2c....
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Once the badly sharpened Iron was re-done....it had a reverse camber, all worn down in the center....it now has a bit of the Proper camber..Wood is Ash, BTW..
 

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I am not sure what the problem is.
The important thing is that the chip-breaker edge has a no gap contact with the cutting-iron.
The chip-breaker should not lay completely flat on the cutting-iron. There must be some flexibility in the assembly for the good working of the lever-cap.
Look at the picture of a cut-away plane here ; there is a gap between the chip-breaker and the cutting-iron where the lever-cap exercise its pressure on the iron-assembly.

Caution, if you change the curvature of the chip breaker, you change the distance between its edge and the depth adjustment slot. I f you make it longer you might not be able anymore to fully retract the cutting blade.

I have had to shorten the chip breaker on a cheapo #4 to be able to use it. Just a few well placed hammer blow to increase the curvature.

Don't change your iron-assembly without knowing what you do. Read this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Sylvain,
The problem is with the tip of the chip braker not mating with the blade. When I started the process you could see a small sliver of light on the left and right sides. The more I worked to mate the chip brakes the bigger the gap became. What I found was the breaker is bent side to side not heal to toe causing me to rock side to side.
I might try a hock breaker or get a used one ( $$ ) or make one. Not sure yet.
The Paul Seller blog you referenced to should be required reading to rehab a plane.
 

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You said the curve in the chip breaker is causing you to allow it to rock when you're trying to refine the edge. Clamp it in a vise to flatten the body and then, while still clamped in the vise, use a flat file across the edge to true it up. Unless I'm missing something, this doesn't seem complicated.
 

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I normally grind the edge of the chipbreaker to a "Knife's Edge" To where the thinnest part is laying on the iron...and will compress just a hair to seal of any gaps.

Some chipbreaker develop a curve to them, from sitting clamped down too long, and too hard....Have have to resort to a few blows with a hammer, to remove the curve...NOT the "hump". Lay the chipbreaker on a flat surface, and see IF it will rock side to side....then flip over and try the other flat space of the chipbreaker.....Goal for the hammer is to flatten any curve out. Otherwise, it will take way too much time, metal, and cussing to close up a gap made by the chipbreaker merely having a curve to it...
 

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