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I am building a chimney cupboard project out of cherry. I was short on cherry so I had to use a couple of pieces from a different batch. On of the stiles on the door is noticeably more red than the rest of the pieces. Will the the lighter pieces darken to match more closely to the one redder piece? If so, how long will it take to equalize the color? I intend to keep the color natural and just finish it with pre-catalyzed lacquer.

I appreciate any advice I can get on this matter.

Rick
 

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Rick, the color variations are a natural part of dealing with cherry. They will tend to blend into a more even tone as the wood ages. This is a process that is largely dependent to the amount of light to which the wood is exposed and can take a considerable amount of time, depending upon the lighting conditions. It is possible to speed up the reaction by exposing the piece to direct sunlight for an extended period which is called "suntanning".

You can use chemical means to give cherry an aged appearance but I do not use those as I like the look that the different color variations give to the piece.
 

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to add. I search the lifts of cherry solids and veneers to avoid using what I call sapwood, the outer circumference of a cherry tree which is always ivory coloured. I find this part of the cherry wood gets whiter and whiter over time while the rest turns a melot red. It can be difficult to see at first as they often steam the wood during the drying process.
 
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