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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Working with sheet goods

I wanted a low bookcase, so I looked on LJ's projects list for ideas. Dr. Sawdust had made one that I liked, so I started the same one. After visiting the lumberyard (ouch!) it's time to break down the plywood. Betsy had asked about this a while back so here are some pictures of how I do it.

I use a base made of 2×4's with lap joints:


Then I lay down the sheet and set up the EZ Guide from Eurikeazone:


With the guide there is no worries about the cut being straight or the edges getting chipped. In fact, the cuts are much, much better than the factory edges.

Another step used for the first time is the "blue tape" method of marking.


In the past I, I mean a friend of mine, sometimes would rotate sheet stock 90 degrees, cut, and have nice big peices of scrap. This time, no issues.

So, in short order, the carcase is dryfit and ready for glue:


Those big ol' stains are from the bargin clamps I got (see review section for Stanley F-style bar clamps)
 

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Registered
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642 Posts
Working with sheet goods

I wanted a low bookcase, so I looked on LJ's projects list for ideas. Dr. Sawdust had made one that I liked, so I started the same one. After visiting the lumberyard (ouch!) it's time to break down the plywood. Betsy had asked about this a while back so here are some pictures of how I do it.

I use a base made of 2×4's with lap joints:


Then I lay down the sheet and set up the EZ Guide from Eurikeazone:


With the guide there is no worries about the cut being straight or the edges getting chipped. In fact, the cuts are much, much better than the factory edges.

Another step used for the first time is the "blue tape" method of marking.


In the past I, I mean a friend of mine, sometimes would rotate sheet stock 90 degrees, cut, and have nice big peices of scrap. This time, no issues.

So, in short order, the carcase is dryfit and ready for glue:


Those big ol' stains are from the bargin clamps I got (see review section for Stanley F-style bar clamps)
Sorry, didn't notice the stains. The pictures got in the way. :)
 

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Registered
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18,890 Posts
Working with sheet goods

I wanted a low bookcase, so I looked on LJ's projects list for ideas. Dr. Sawdust had made one that I liked, so I started the same one. After visiting the lumberyard (ouch!) it's time to break down the plywood. Betsy had asked about this a while back so here are some pictures of how I do it.

I use a base made of 2×4's with lap joints:


Then I lay down the sheet and set up the EZ Guide from Eurikeazone:


With the guide there is no worries about the cut being straight or the edges getting chipped. In fact, the cuts are much, much better than the factory edges.

Another step used for the first time is the "blue tape" method of marking.


In the past I, I mean a friend of mine, sometimes would rotate sheet stock 90 degrees, cut, and have nice big peices of scrap. This time, no issues.

So, in short order, the carcase is dryfit and ready for glue:


Those big ol' stains are from the bargin clamps I got (see review section for Stanley F-style bar clamps)
this is great. Thanks for the step/step pictures!
 
Joined
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13,555 Posts
Working with sheet goods

I wanted a low bookcase, so I looked on LJ's projects list for ideas. Dr. Sawdust had made one that I liked, so I started the same one. After visiting the lumberyard (ouch!) it's time to break down the plywood. Betsy had asked about this a while back so here are some pictures of how I do it.

I use a base made of 2×4's with lap joints:


Then I lay down the sheet and set up the EZ Guide from Eurikeazone:


With the guide there is no worries about the cut being straight or the edges getting chipped. In fact, the cuts are much, much better than the factory edges.

Another step used for the first time is the "blue tape" method of marking.


In the past I, I mean a friend of mine, sometimes would rotate sheet stock 90 degrees, cut, and have nice big peices of scrap. This time, no issues.

So, in short order, the carcase is dryfit and ready for glue:


Those big ol' stains are from the bargin clamps I got (see review section for Stanley F-style bar clamps)
Going to be a great project!
 

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Registered
Joined
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73 Posts
Working with sheet goods

I wanted a low bookcase, so I looked on LJ's projects list for ideas. Dr. Sawdust had made one that I liked, so I started the same one. After visiting the lumberyard (ouch!) it's time to break down the plywood. Betsy had asked about this a while back so here are some pictures of how I do it.

I use a base made of 2×4's with lap joints:


Then I lay down the sheet and set up the EZ Guide from Eurikeazone:


With the guide there is no worries about the cut being straight or the edges getting chipped. In fact, the cuts are much, much better than the factory edges.

Another step used for the first time is the "blue tape" method of marking.


In the past I, I mean a friend of mine, sometimes would rotate sheet stock 90 degrees, cut, and have nice big peices of scrap. This time, no issues.

So, in short order, the carcase is dryfit and ready for glue:


Those big ol' stains are from the bargin clamps I got (see review section for Stanley F-style bar clamps)
great idea
 
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