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hello my name is Jerrod and am fairly new to woodworking.

I recently went to a wood yard and bought some pieces of oak and cypress without thinking of how dry the wood is. I am building bed Room furniture and want oak table tops for the side tables. The piece I got is a 6 inch thick slab with natural edges. It's 3 feet long. It's heavy and I have it in my garage and cannot keep it outside. I do not know moisture content. Since I just hobby about woodworking I really don't care to get a meter. Given this info is it worth dealing with. I don't want to store it for years. If I can't use it in the next month I will cut it up for the burn pile. I want to make a one inch thick top from pieces I will mill from this slab. The tree was fell about 3 months ago. And milled to its current size shortly after.

Thanks for any responce.

Yes I am new. This is my first post.
 

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Sling, was the stock kiln dried or was it sold green? If you don't know, ask the lumber yard. If it was kiln dried, resaw it to about 1.25" and let it acclimate until you are ready to mill it to final dimensions. Even then, mill it close and let it acclimate some more before final dimensioning.

If it was green, you will likely see some checking (cracks) develop as it dries. HTH
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It was sold as green. He said it had been in his yard cut for 3 months.

Thanks for the responce.

The guy assumed I knew more than I dO. He sold me two pieces. One of cypress and one of this oak I speak of. I'm not out but 20$

If I cut it down to 3 or 4 inch pieces. How long would it need to set in my attic. By next month my attic should be a constant 90 degrees. And after that should start hitting 110 to 120 degrees daily.

Thanks again.
 

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Hi,
If it is 6" thick and you want to cut it to 3 or 4 inches (assuming from the thickness part), you will have some nice quarter saw wood depending on how wide and straight grain it is. The center of it will be the waste. If you sticker the pieces and put a fan on them, at 120 degrees you may be good to go in a few months. Once a month, get a piece of the center and cut it in half and see how damp it is. You should be able to tell by just touching it since the saw blade will heat the wood. Also, the sawdust can give you an indication especially if you run it through the planer.
 
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