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Great question.
Danish oil most likely has some dryer in it already,too much dryer can cause cloudiness or curing problem,if you are curious to know ,just as a few drops/half a cup of danish oil in a separate container,use it on a scrap piece and see if it made a difference in drying time.let us know ,now you got me thinking.
 

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I'm with Ken but I don't flood the surface, I just wipe it on and keep wiping until it feels dry. Then repeat until you're happy with the look.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I never used the dryer.
I've used this on several things over past few years. It is great stuff if you want quick and easy.

I just follow the instructions.

Pour a little on rub it around then finish along the grain.
Wait 15-25 minutes and wipe off excess
Repeat
Done.

On another note. I use old school floor wasxfrom Johnson. It comes in a yellow can/bottle.
It is a great product to rejuvenate floors and wood furniture. I used it on my dull oak wood cabinets.
I even use it on a dull formica counter in a rental property ever time i get a new tenant.
Just wipe it on thin and let dry for 30 minutes to an hour.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Why would you?
The whole point of Danish oil is that it dries slow

- Drew
Well first off, I don't think it dries slow at all.
8-10 hours. I don't think there are any other finishes that you can use for real in 8-10 hours.

I just did two coats on my rolltop desk in about an hour and a half, two coats on the rolling top grooves. I even did my old KLH speaker cabinets while I was at it.

And second, why wouldnt I want something to dry faster?

No seriously. I'm having people over tomorrow and I want my pieces to be dry for them. I was thinking that japan dryer would allow me to do my stuff in the morning and have it ready for the afternoon.
But the fumes alone would be too strong.

Great product. It's basically idiot proof which is good because I can be an idiot at times.
;-)

a few weeks back I put a coat on the wooden sides of a vintage synthesizer from 1976. I also gave the dull tolex parts a light coat. the thing looked like it just came off the showroom floor.
 

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The best way to find out is to try it, but on scrap. I love danish oil, but it is the slowest finish I use. I let it soak in well, and do several coats. If you really need fast, go with shellac or lacquer.

The one drawback with thinning finishes (or at least the main one for me) is that you are altering the chemistry somewhat and you can make your finishes brittle, cloudy, or otherwise suboptimal.
 

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I'm sure you guys know more than I,
However mine was totally dry within 24 hours.
I have 100 year old roll top desk and every few years I wash it down with Murphy's oil soap, touch up the nicks and dings and then put an application of danish oil (two coats with 30 mins, wait 15 wipe, then towel buff after its dry) on top of what ever finish was on it when I got it. I've used it this way on several pieces and on some bare pieces. Here's some pics of my desk. Kinda proud.
I finally got fed up with stuff falling off back and replaced the old crackly piece along the back with a piece of pine ply. Stained it to match and did an extra coat of Danish.
Brown Wood Rectangle Wood stain Tints and shades


Brown Table Wood Rectangle Flooring


Brown Wood Rectangle Wood stain Varnish


Brown Wood Rectangle Flooring Plank
 

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