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What are the differences of a cambered blade, toothed blade and regular blade?

Cambered blade - What is the reason someone would use a cambered blade over a regular blade? Is this for removing more material easily when the blade is lowered, removing edge marks from wood or both? do smoothers, jointers, jack planes scrub planes all benefit from a cambered edge (I usually see these on scrub planes,jointer planes, jack planes but not smoothing planes)

toothed blade - I don't know too much about this type of blade. It seems like its a very specific blade made for exotic woods. What situation would a toothed blade be used other than exotic woods? Would toothed planes be used for removing large amounts of material roughly?
 

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I use a slightly cambered iron for smoothing to prevent the lines that show up when smoothing a board. A more heavily cambered iron can be used for taking bigger cuts on a board like scrubbing a board but I don't do that because I prefer a slight camber on basically all my irons. A toothed iron works well with highly figured woods as it reduces tear out. You won't see the nice curlies like with a cambered smoothing plane or a regular plane. You end up with chips more than curly shavings. But it does reduce tear out even with a low angle bevel up plane like the Veritas. A regular iron, flat across the edge, I don't use but I think you could probably use it for all planing functions although you will end up with the lines and will need to clean those up with a card scraper or sanding. This is not the gospel truth. Just my approach to planing by the way. :)
 

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I slightly camber my ploane blades so that I can plane the field of a board without digging lines into it. As elche said the deep pcamber can be used with or across the grain for aggressive stock removal. I use a thickness planer and a jointer to establish flat stock, so I stay away from the deep camber. Toothed irons are specifically for wild grain, but I've never met a grain so wild that I couldn't work it by simply raising the iron and changing the angle of approach, so I've never owned or used a toothed iron.

I have one iron that I keep dead flat along the edge, that is my shoulder plane.
 

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Toothed irons are also used to "true" a surface before veneering and to provide a better tooth for adhering the veneer.
When using sawn veneers it may also be necessary to true the face of the veneer itself. A toothing plane will immediately show up any low spots.
 
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