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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Plan

It feels good finally to be getting back to wood working. During late December-February, my garage was just too damn cold to work in, despite having two space heaters going (the wife was too scared of propane-based heat sources, so those were nixed…). Then, in February, we decided to put our house on the market - so all free time started going to fixing things up and getting our house ready to sell. That's all done with, so it's time to get some wood working done.

Here is my first design, based loosely on a table here.



Pretty simple, but this will be my first attempt at a real furniture piece. I've been practicing hand cutting mortises, so hopefully this build will be pretty straight forward. I bought 40bf of poplar today (~12bf of which is 8/4 for the legs), which I also plan on using for the butcher-block style top. I don't know how well poplar would stand up to abuse, but really this is more of a side-board for our kitchen than a cutting board, so I think it will be ok.

Any comments or critiques on the design are always welcome.
 

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The Plan

It feels good finally to be getting back to wood working. During late December-February, my garage was just too damn cold to work in, despite having two space heaters going (the wife was too scared of propane-based heat sources, so those were nixed…). Then, in February, we decided to put our house on the market - so all free time started going to fixing things up and getting our house ready to sell. That's all done with, so it's time to get some wood working done.

Here is my first design, based loosely on a table here.



Pretty simple, but this will be my first attempt at a real furniture piece. I've been practicing hand cutting mortises, so hopefully this build will be pretty straight forward. I bought 40bf of poplar today (~12bf of which is 8/4 for the legs), which I also plan on using for the butcher-block style top. I don't know how well poplar would stand up to abuse, but really this is more of a side-board for our kitchen than a cutting board, so I think it will be ok.

Any comments or critiques on the design are always welcome.
Not sure if a poplar top will withstand normal cutting board use. The preferred wood for that is normally hard maple. I made one similar a couple years ago. Let me know if I can help in any way. Great project.
 

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The Plan

It feels good finally to be getting back to wood working. During late December-February, my garage was just too damn cold to work in, despite having two space heaters going (the wife was too scared of propane-based heat sources, so those were nixed…). Then, in February, we decided to put our house on the market - so all free time started going to fixing things up and getting our house ready to sell. That's all done with, so it's time to get some wood working done.

Here is my first design, based loosely on a table here.



Pretty simple, but this will be my first attempt at a real furniture piece. I've been practicing hand cutting mortises, so hopefully this build will be pretty straight forward. I bought 40bf of poplar today (~12bf of which is 8/4 for the legs), which I also plan on using for the butcher-block style top. I don't know how well poplar would stand up to abuse, but really this is more of a side-board for our kitchen than a cutting board, so I think it will be ok.

Any comments or critiques on the design are always welcome.
Poplar is definately not hard enough for a cutting board and it's a bit porus. Stick with hard maple like Troy suggests. Even for just a work surface it's too soft.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The Plan

It feels good finally to be getting back to wood working. During late December-February, my garage was just too damn cold to work in, despite having two space heaters going (the wife was too scared of propane-based heat sources, so those were nixed…). Then, in February, we decided to put our house on the market - so all free time started going to fixing things up and getting our house ready to sell. That's all done with, so it's time to get some wood working done.

Here is my first design, based loosely on a table here.



Pretty simple, but this will be my first attempt at a real furniture piece. I've been practicing hand cutting mortises, so hopefully this build will be pretty straight forward. I bought 40bf of poplar today (~12bf of which is 8/4 for the legs), which I also plan on using for the butcher-block style top. I don't know how well poplar would stand up to abuse, but really this is more of a side-board for our kitchen than a cutting board, so I think it will be ok.

Any comments or critiques on the design are always welcome.
Yeah, I didn't think poplar was that far down on the Janka scale, but it's quite a bit softer than I thought (softer than doug fir and yellow pine…). I had debated getting some maple for the top, since I only have a small amount of soft/ambrosia maple left, but I'm wanting to do this on the cheap since I'm buying S3S material. I wasn't wanting to use my jointer/planer while our house was on the market, cause I still don't have proper dust collection and they make a pretty good mess.

Maybe I'll try and find some pallets for free with some maple/oak in them…
 

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The Plan

It feels good finally to be getting back to wood working. During late December-February, my garage was just too damn cold to work in, despite having two space heaters going (the wife was too scared of propane-based heat sources, so those were nixed…). Then, in February, we decided to put our house on the market - so all free time started going to fixing things up and getting our house ready to sell. That's all done with, so it's time to get some wood working done.

Here is my first design, based loosely on a table here.



Pretty simple, but this will be my first attempt at a real furniture piece. I've been practicing hand cutting mortises, so hopefully this build will be pretty straight forward. I bought 40bf of poplar today (~12bf of which is 8/4 for the legs), which I also plan on using for the butcher-block style top. I don't know how well poplar would stand up to abuse, but really this is more of a side-board for our kitchen than a cutting board, so I think it will be ok.

Any comments or critiques on the design are always welcome.
The only reason poplar is a hardwood is because it has leaves instead of needles. It'll be fine for the structure. Nice design by the way. That'll make a great addition to your kitchen. Hope all goes well with the house.
 

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The Plan

It feels good finally to be getting back to wood working. During late December-February, my garage was just too damn cold to work in, despite having two space heaters going (the wife was too scared of propane-based heat sources, so those were nixed…). Then, in February, we decided to put our house on the market - so all free time started going to fixing things up and getting our house ready to sell. That's all done with, so it's time to get some wood working done.

Here is my first design, based loosely on a table here.



Pretty simple, but this will be my first attempt at a real furniture piece. I've been practicing hand cutting mortises, so hopefully this build will be pretty straight forward. I bought 40bf of poplar today (~12bf of which is 8/4 for the legs), which I also plan on using for the butcher-block style top. I don't know how well poplar would stand up to abuse, but really this is more of a side-board for our kitchen than a cutting board, so I think it will be ok.

Any comments or critiques on the design are always welcome.
here's a thought----I've used poplar for cutting boards and they don't hold up very well as already mentioned--we used the boards for awhile and then resurfaced them until we ran out of board--in your current situation you might do the same thing with the lumber you've already purchased--make the top thick enough to resurface a couple of times--don't attach it permanently---and when you get back into the full swing of wood working you can make a permanent top out of hard maple
 

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The Plan

It feels good finally to be getting back to wood working. During late December-February, my garage was just too damn cold to work in, despite having two space heaters going (the wife was too scared of propane-based heat sources, so those were nixed…). Then, in February, we decided to put our house on the market - so all free time started going to fixing things up and getting our house ready to sell. That's all done with, so it's time to get some wood working done.

Here is my first design, based loosely on a table here.



Pretty simple, but this will be my first attempt at a real furniture piece. I've been practicing hand cutting mortises, so hopefully this build will be pretty straight forward. I bought 40bf of poplar today (~12bf of which is 8/4 for the legs), which I also plan on using for the butcher-block style top. I don't know how well poplar would stand up to abuse, but really this is more of a side-board for our kitchen than a cutting board, so I think it will be ok.

Any comments or critiques on the design are always welcome.
Well I can see this is quite an old thread, so I have a question about the project and how it has held up. I'm looking at doing a butchers block counter for a 6 foot long section of counter with an overhanging bar (at counter height). How did this top wear? Should I spend the extra money on the maple, or use the poplar I already have? I know everyone says I should, but I want to hear it from somebody who tried poplar for this purpose.

Thanks.

As a note, I'm doing this for appearance, not to have a 6' x 3' cutting board.

EDIT: So I may have jumped the gun on asking this. Although I don't see a decision on the wood to use on the top, I do see maple and cherry later on in the blog. Does that mean you ditched the poplar idea?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The Plan

It feels good finally to be getting back to wood working. During late December-February, my garage was just too damn cold to work in, despite having two space heaters going (the wife was too scared of propane-based heat sources, so those were nixed…). Then, in February, we decided to put our house on the market - so all free time started going to fixing things up and getting our house ready to sell. That's all done with, so it's time to get some wood working done.

Here is my first design, based loosely on a table here.



Pretty simple, but this will be my first attempt at a real furniture piece. I've been practicing hand cutting mortises, so hopefully this build will be pretty straight forward. I bought 40bf of poplar today (~12bf of which is 8/4 for the legs), which I also plan on using for the butcher-block style top. I don't know how well poplar would stand up to abuse, but really this is more of a side-board for our kitchen than a cutting board, so I think it will be ok.

Any comments or critiques on the design are always welcome.
Yep, it was ditched. I was convinced by the fact that on the Janka scale, poplar is actually softer than pine. I don't use it as a cutting board, but it does get a fair amount of traffic in our kitchen so something that soft would not have been good as a table top surface. The base is still poplar and has held up very well (amazing to see how much the shelf contracts into the breadboard ends during the winter - over 1/16th on each side), and the maple/cherry top is also doing very well. I have not noticed any dings in it despite my wife setting her purse on it just about every day.
 

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The Plan

It feels good finally to be getting back to wood working. During late December-February, my garage was just too damn cold to work in, despite having two space heaters going (the wife was too scared of propane-based heat sources, so those were nixed…). Then, in February, we decided to put our house on the market - so all free time started going to fixing things up and getting our house ready to sell. That's all done with, so it's time to get some wood working done.

Here is my first design, based loosely on a table here.



Pretty simple, but this will be my first attempt at a real furniture piece. I've been practicing hand cutting mortises, so hopefully this build will be pretty straight forward. I bought 40bf of poplar today (~12bf of which is 8/4 for the legs), which I also plan on using for the butcher-block style top. I don't know how well poplar would stand up to abuse, but really this is more of a side-board for our kitchen than a cutting board, so I think it will be ok.

Any comments or critiques on the design are always welcome.
Excellent. Thanks for the insight. I'll probably go ahead and do maple. That table does look wonderful, by the way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Progress on the Legs

I got the legs all milled up, 1 3/4" square, and cut the bevels on the bottom. I screwed a fence to my mitre gauge, which had a block of wood glued to it which allowed me to keep the bevels somewhat consistent. I say somewhat, because I think my mitre gauge didn't lock down when tightened, as there is a very slight variation in the bevels so they don't meet up in the back on all the legs. Obviously nothing to care about - the only way you'd be able to see the variation was if you flipped the table over and locked at the inner-most corner of each leg.

Just as a refresher, here's what the finished project is supposed to look like:



I used my circular marking gauge to mark out the mortises, since I don't have a fancy mortise gauge this took a while. I set the gauge for the top, and marked that out for all 8 mortises, followed by the bottom, middle, and sides. I didn't adjust the marking gauge until the same line had been marked for each mortise. I also indexed the mark off the same corner each time, so that the offsets would be the same.

I then took each leg to my drill press and aligned the fence so my forstner bit hit smack middle on the center line of the mortise at the top and bottom and started drilling. All told, it took me about an hour to mark and drill out each of the 8 mortises - not bad in my opinion, considering these are my first non-practice mortises :)

I took the rough drilled mortises to my bench and clamped them down, and started to clean them out with a 1" and a 1/4" chisel. This is a really fast process, as my forstner bit is 1/4" as well, so there's not too much waste to clean up. The latest edition of (I think) Woodsmith magazine has a really good article on doing mortises with a drill press this way. The marking lines are used to line up your chisels, so be sure when you're drilling you don't get too close to them. As the article says, it's best to use a bit that's a little undersized, but 1/4" is my smallest forstner bit so I make do with what I have. For the first cuts with the chisel, just make tiny cuts around the perimeter of the mortise to establish the mouth. Then, with the 1/4" chisel, work from the middle to each end to clean out the waste. Once the mouth is established, you can pretty much chisel all the way to the bottom of the mortise (at least that's what I do). A little bit of cleanup is all that's required usually, and I can do each mortise in about 5-10 minutes.

I've got two legs done so far, the two on the right in this picture. You can see the rough drilled mortises I've got left to do:



And here's the view showing all eight:



Once these mortises are done, I'll probably start working on the top stretchers, followed by the bottom stretchers and the center shelf. I'm really liking poplar, it works really easy, even if it does produce a really fine dust when cutting/planning it - only marginally better than the dust MDF makes (but at least the poplar doesn't hang in the air, requiring extensive lung protection).
 
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Progress on the Legs

I got the legs all milled up, 1 3/4" square, and cut the bevels on the bottom. I screwed a fence to my mitre gauge, which had a block of wood glued to it which allowed me to keep the bevels somewhat consistent. I say somewhat, because I think my mitre gauge didn't lock down when tightened, as there is a very slight variation in the bevels so they don't meet up in the back on all the legs. Obviously nothing to care about - the only way you'd be able to see the variation was if you flipped the table over and locked at the inner-most corner of each leg.

Just as a refresher, here's what the finished project is supposed to look like:



I used my circular marking gauge to mark out the mortises, since I don't have a fancy mortise gauge this took a while. I set the gauge for the top, and marked that out for all 8 mortises, followed by the bottom, middle, and sides. I didn't adjust the marking gauge until the same line had been marked for each mortise. I also indexed the mark off the same corner each time, so that the offsets would be the same.

I then took each leg to my drill press and aligned the fence so my forstner bit hit smack middle on the center line of the mortise at the top and bottom and started drilling. All told, it took me about an hour to mark and drill out each of the 8 mortises - not bad in my opinion, considering these are my first non-practice mortises :)

I took the rough drilled mortises to my bench and clamped them down, and started to clean them out with a 1" and a 1/4" chisel. This is a really fast process, as my forstner bit is 1/4" as well, so there's not too much waste to clean up. The latest edition of (I think) Woodsmith magazine has a really good article on doing mortises with a drill press this way. The marking lines are used to line up your chisels, so be sure when you're drilling you don't get too close to them. As the article says, it's best to use a bit that's a little undersized, but 1/4" is my smallest forstner bit so I make do with what I have. For the first cuts with the chisel, just make tiny cuts around the perimeter of the mortise to establish the mouth. Then, with the 1/4" chisel, work from the middle to each end to clean out the waste. Once the mouth is established, you can pretty much chisel all the way to the bottom of the mortise (at least that's what I do). A little bit of cleanup is all that's required usually, and I can do each mortise in about 5-10 minutes.

I've got two legs done so far, the two on the right in this picture. You can see the rough drilled mortises I've got left to do:



And here's the view showing all eight:



Once these mortises are done, I'll probably start working on the top stretchers, followed by the bottom stretchers and the center shelf. I'm really liking poplar, it works really easy, even if it does produce a really fine dust when cutting/planning it - only marginally better than the dust MDF makes (but at least the poplar doesn't hang in the air, requiring extensive lung protection).
How did you cut the mortises?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Progress on the Legs

I got the legs all milled up, 1 3/4" square, and cut the bevels on the bottom. I screwed a fence to my mitre gauge, which had a block of wood glued to it which allowed me to keep the bevels somewhat consistent. I say somewhat, because I think my mitre gauge didn't lock down when tightened, as there is a very slight variation in the bevels so they don't meet up in the back on all the legs. Obviously nothing to care about - the only way you'd be able to see the variation was if you flipped the table over and locked at the inner-most corner of each leg.

Just as a refresher, here's what the finished project is supposed to look like:



I used my circular marking gauge to mark out the mortises, since I don't have a fancy mortise gauge this took a while. I set the gauge for the top, and marked that out for all 8 mortises, followed by the bottom, middle, and sides. I didn't adjust the marking gauge until the same line had been marked for each mortise. I also indexed the mark off the same corner each time, so that the offsets would be the same.

I then took each leg to my drill press and aligned the fence so my forstner bit hit smack middle on the center line of the mortise at the top and bottom and started drilling. All told, it took me about an hour to mark and drill out each of the 8 mortises - not bad in my opinion, considering these are my first non-practice mortises :)

I took the rough drilled mortises to my bench and clamped them down, and started to clean them out with a 1" and a 1/4" chisel. This is a really fast process, as my forstner bit is 1/4" as well, so there's not too much waste to clean up. The latest edition of (I think) Woodsmith magazine has a really good article on doing mortises with a drill press this way. The marking lines are used to line up your chisels, so be sure when you're drilling you don't get too close to them. As the article says, it's best to use a bit that's a little undersized, but 1/4" is my smallest forstner bit so I make do with what I have. For the first cuts with the chisel, just make tiny cuts around the perimeter of the mortise to establish the mouth. Then, with the 1/4" chisel, work from the middle to each end to clean out the waste. Once the mouth is established, you can pretty much chisel all the way to the bottom of the mortise (at least that's what I do). A little bit of cleanup is all that's required usually, and I can do each mortise in about 5-10 minutes.

I've got two legs done so far, the two on the right in this picture. You can see the rough drilled mortises I've got left to do:



And here's the view showing all eight:



Once these mortises are done, I'll probably start working on the top stretchers, followed by the bottom stretchers and the center shelf. I'm really liking poplar, it works really easy, even if it does produce a really fine dust when cutting/planning it - only marginally better than the dust MDF makes (but at least the poplar doesn't hang in the air, requiring extensive lung protection).
I used a 1/4" forstner bit on a drill press to remove most of the waste, and then used a 1" and 1/4" chisel to square it up.
 

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Progress on the Legs

I got the legs all milled up, 1 3/4" square, and cut the bevels on the bottom. I screwed a fence to my mitre gauge, which had a block of wood glued to it which allowed me to keep the bevels somewhat consistent. I say somewhat, because I think my mitre gauge didn't lock down when tightened, as there is a very slight variation in the bevels so they don't meet up in the back on all the legs. Obviously nothing to care about - the only way you'd be able to see the variation was if you flipped the table over and locked at the inner-most corner of each leg.

Just as a refresher, here's what the finished project is supposed to look like:



I used my circular marking gauge to mark out the mortises, since I don't have a fancy mortise gauge this took a while. I set the gauge for the top, and marked that out for all 8 mortises, followed by the bottom, middle, and sides. I didn't adjust the marking gauge until the same line had been marked for each mortise. I also indexed the mark off the same corner each time, so that the offsets would be the same.

I then took each leg to my drill press and aligned the fence so my forstner bit hit smack middle on the center line of the mortise at the top and bottom and started drilling. All told, it took me about an hour to mark and drill out each of the 8 mortises - not bad in my opinion, considering these are my first non-practice mortises :)

I took the rough drilled mortises to my bench and clamped them down, and started to clean them out with a 1" and a 1/4" chisel. This is a really fast process, as my forstner bit is 1/4" as well, so there's not too much waste to clean up. The latest edition of (I think) Woodsmith magazine has a really good article on doing mortises with a drill press this way. The marking lines are used to line up your chisels, so be sure when you're drilling you don't get too close to them. As the article says, it's best to use a bit that's a little undersized, but 1/4" is my smallest forstner bit so I make do with what I have. For the first cuts with the chisel, just make tiny cuts around the perimeter of the mortise to establish the mouth. Then, with the 1/4" chisel, work from the middle to each end to clean out the waste. Once the mouth is established, you can pretty much chisel all the way to the bottom of the mortise (at least that's what I do). A little bit of cleanup is all that's required usually, and I can do each mortise in about 5-10 minutes.

I've got two legs done so far, the two on the right in this picture. You can see the rough drilled mortises I've got left to do:



And here's the view showing all eight:



Once these mortises are done, I'll probably start working on the top stretchers, followed by the bottom stretchers and the center shelf. I'm really liking poplar, it works really easy, even if it does produce a really fine dust when cutting/planning it - only marginally better than the dust MDF makes (but at least the poplar doesn't hang in the air, requiring extensive lung protection).
Good start
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
More Progress, and a Bandsaw Restoration Update

Haven't had much time to work in the last few weeks, my wife and I are in the process of selling our house/buying a new one, and we finally got a contract on our house! We also had our contract accepted for the house we want, so we've been in the process of getting inspections and tests and all the crap you have to go through. Thankfully, we only had a few minor things to correct in our house (fire detectors in every room, our garage stair case railing had more than a 4" gap in one spot… etc.), so we're pretty much in the clear.

So, of course today I get to do some woodworking finally :)

After finishing up the mortises on the legs, I finally put my stacked dado blade to use and made the stretchers/tenons. That was a lot of fun, and went very quickly thanks to the dado blade (Oshlun 8" if anyone cares). I didn't take a pic, but I had all of the tenons fit to the mortises pretty well, just one or two to clean up a little.

However… I'm going to have to redo them because of todays work…

Today I glued up the panel for the bottom shelf, and got a little lazy - the plank I selected for it was just a little bit narrower after glue-up than the stretchers I made (for the overall depth of the table). So, I'm just going to trim 1/2" - 1" off the short stretchers.

Here's a pic of the legs dry-fit with the lower shelf:



The shelf is made up of three boards glued together, which came out pretty well (considering this is only the second time I've tried this). I still have a little cleanup of the glue lines and some more scraping/sanding, but it's pretty close to being done. I just need to scrape the rest of the board, because I can feel the tiniest divet where I over-scraped the glue lines.

Bandsaw Restoration

Also, I finally got to paint another piece of the bandsaw today - the main body:



I'm getting close to finishing up with the painting, just have the removable upper/lower wheel covers to do, along with the edge of the table and a few more small parts that I'm being lazy about sanding/taping off.

The suggestions from the last update were all great, and I've overcome the issues I was having (definitely waiting too long before top-coating). Since I've adjusted my technique, I've had zero problems:



After curing, the bubbling on the flywheel pretty much went down, so I'm just going to leave it as is - it's a bandsaw not a pro auto body job :)
 

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More Progress, and a Bandsaw Restoration Update

Haven't had much time to work in the last few weeks, my wife and I are in the process of selling our house/buying a new one, and we finally got a contract on our house! We also had our contract accepted for the house we want, so we've been in the process of getting inspections and tests and all the crap you have to go through. Thankfully, we only had a few minor things to correct in our house (fire detectors in every room, our garage stair case railing had more than a 4" gap in one spot… etc.), so we're pretty much in the clear.

So, of course today I get to do some woodworking finally :)

After finishing up the mortises on the legs, I finally put my stacked dado blade to use and made the stretchers/tenons. That was a lot of fun, and went very quickly thanks to the dado blade (Oshlun 8" if anyone cares). I didn't take a pic, but I had all of the tenons fit to the mortises pretty well, just one or two to clean up a little.

However… I'm going to have to redo them because of todays work…

Today I glued up the panel for the bottom shelf, and got a little lazy - the plank I selected for it was just a little bit narrower after glue-up than the stretchers I made (for the overall depth of the table). So, I'm just going to trim 1/2" - 1" off the short stretchers.

Here's a pic of the legs dry-fit with the lower shelf:



The shelf is made up of three boards glued together, which came out pretty well (considering this is only the second time I've tried this). I still have a little cleanup of the glue lines and some more scraping/sanding, but it's pretty close to being done. I just need to scrape the rest of the board, because I can feel the tiniest divet where I over-scraped the glue lines.

Bandsaw Restoration

Also, I finally got to paint another piece of the bandsaw today - the main body:



I'm getting close to finishing up with the painting, just have the removable upper/lower wheel covers to do, along with the edge of the table and a few more small parts that I'm being lazy about sanding/taping off.

The suggestions from the last update were all great, and I've overcome the issues I was having (definitely waiting too long before top-coating). Since I've adjusted my technique, I've had zero problems:



After curing, the bubbling on the flywheel pretty much went down, so I'm just going to leave it as is - it's a bandsaw not a pro auto body job :)
How do you plan on attaching the bottom shelf to the legs? Will you use a dowl or is there a support underneath the shelf?

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
More Progress, and a Bandsaw Restoration Update

Haven't had much time to work in the last few weeks, my wife and I are in the process of selling our house/buying a new one, and we finally got a contract on our house! We also had our contract accepted for the house we want, so we've been in the process of getting inspections and tests and all the crap you have to go through. Thankfully, we only had a few minor things to correct in our house (fire detectors in every room, our garage stair case railing had more than a 4" gap in one spot… etc.), so we're pretty much in the clear.

So, of course today I get to do some woodworking finally :)

After finishing up the mortises on the legs, I finally put my stacked dado blade to use and made the stretchers/tenons. That was a lot of fun, and went very quickly thanks to the dado blade (Oshlun 8" if anyone cares). I didn't take a pic, but I had all of the tenons fit to the mortises pretty well, just one or two to clean up a little.

However… I'm going to have to redo them because of todays work…

Today I glued up the panel for the bottom shelf, and got a little lazy - the plank I selected for it was just a little bit narrower after glue-up than the stretchers I made (for the overall depth of the table). So, I'm just going to trim 1/2" - 1" off the short stretchers.

Here's a pic of the legs dry-fit with the lower shelf:



The shelf is made up of three boards glued together, which came out pretty well (considering this is only the second time I've tried this). I still have a little cleanup of the glue lines and some more scraping/sanding, but it's pretty close to being done. I just need to scrape the rest of the board, because I can feel the tiniest divet where I over-scraped the glue lines.

Bandsaw Restoration

Also, I finally got to paint another piece of the bandsaw today - the main body:



I'm getting close to finishing up with the painting, just have the removable upper/lower wheel covers to do, along with the edge of the table and a few more small parts that I'm being lazy about sanding/taping off.

The suggestions from the last update were all great, and I've overcome the issues I was having (definitely waiting too long before top-coating). Since I've adjusted my technique, I've had zero problems:



After curing, the bubbling on the flywheel pretty much went down, so I'm just going to leave it as is - it's a bandsaw not a pro auto body job :)
The legs have a 45 degree notch cut into them, and the shelf has a matching cut on each corner - so the shelf just sits in the notch and will be glued that way. I haven't decided, but I may do an edge banding around the shelf to hide the end-grain portion and to make it look a little nicer. If anyone gets Woodsmith magazine, they did a veneered table with a similar configuration an issue or two ago.

To create the notch, I created a simple jig by setting my table saw blade to 45 and cut a bevel on each side of a piece of poplar, so the shape was something like this: \__/ I then ripped that in half and oriented the beveled edges so it created a 90 degree cradle. I glued/nailed these to piece of 1/4" plywood and used that on my sled to cut the notches in leg. I used a stop for the leg to ensure that the top of the notch was consistent on all 4 legs, and then used a caliper to mark 3/4" down from that to ensure the notch was perfectly sized for the shelf.

I can take some pictures of the setup if anyone's interested. The jig wasn't perfect, but it was good enough :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Mostly Done Except for the Top

Here's the dry-fit, the tape's on there to keep it from falling apart when I adjust things/check for square. All the stretchers have been resized to match the shelf size:




Here's a detail of how the leg holds the shelf:



I still need to clean that up a little since there's a bit of a gap on all 4 legs, which means I may need to trim a little off the stretchers again (maybe just 1/16" or so from each end).

As for the top, I know this is supposed to be a butcher-block table, but I'm seriously considering just making a flat panel for the top instead, since all I have is poplar currently. My other option (since I do have a little maple left) was to make a butcher block top out of alternating pieces of maple/poplar. I figure the top will be removable with buttons, so if I made it out of some combination of poplar I could always remove it in the future and put a more durable top on it if I actually wanted to use it for cutting/etc.

I'm not really beholden to the original design (I've already scrapped the middle shelf), since this is all a learning experience for me. This piece is a first for me on many levels: first mortise/tenon joints (mortises hand cut, well at least after I used the drill press), first panel glue up, first time I've worked with 8/4 material… the list goes on. First and foremost - this is the first piece of furniture I've ever tried to build, so I'm happy as long as I finish it somehow :)
 

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Mostly Done Except for the Top

Here's the dry-fit, the tape's on there to keep it from falling apart when I adjust things/check for square. All the stretchers have been resized to match the shelf size:




Here's a detail of how the leg holds the shelf:



I still need to clean that up a little since there's a bit of a gap on all 4 legs, which means I may need to trim a little off the stretchers again (maybe just 1/16" or so from each end).

As for the top, I know this is supposed to be a butcher-block table, but I'm seriously considering just making a flat panel for the top instead, since all I have is poplar currently. My other option (since I do have a little maple left) was to make a butcher block top out of alternating pieces of maple/poplar. I figure the top will be removable with buttons, so if I made it out of some combination of poplar I could always remove it in the future and put a more durable top on it if I actually wanted to use it for cutting/etc.

I'm not really beholden to the original design (I've already scrapped the middle shelf), since this is all a learning experience for me. This piece is a first for me on many levels: first mortise/tenon joints (mortises hand cut, well at least after I used the drill press), first panel glue up, first time I've worked with 8/4 material… the list goes on. First and foremost - this is the first piece of furniture I've ever tried to build, so I'm happy as long as I finish it somehow :)
it looks great!

FYI: Butcher block is usually referring to a long grain thick panel made of thin strips. the End grain version is usually explicitly referred to as 'end grain butcher block' if thats what you meant.

one more thing- curios about the shelf - is there anything to allow for wood expansion on the shelf? it looks like flat sawn maple, and fairly wide which means it would be subject to some expansion/contraction (figured I'd ask this now since this is still dry fit…)
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Mostly Done Except for the Top

Here's the dry-fit, the tape's on there to keep it from falling apart when I adjust things/check for square. All the stretchers have been resized to match the shelf size:




Here's a detail of how the leg holds the shelf:



I still need to clean that up a little since there's a bit of a gap on all 4 legs, which means I may need to trim a little off the stretchers again (maybe just 1/16" or so from each end).

As for the top, I know this is supposed to be a butcher-block table, but I'm seriously considering just making a flat panel for the top instead, since all I have is poplar currently. My other option (since I do have a little maple left) was to make a butcher block top out of alternating pieces of maple/poplar. I figure the top will be removable with buttons, so if I made it out of some combination of poplar I could always remove it in the future and put a more durable top on it if I actually wanted to use it for cutting/etc.

I'm not really beholden to the original design (I've already scrapped the middle shelf), since this is all a learning experience for me. This piece is a first for me on many levels: first mortise/tenon joints (mortises hand cut, well at least after I used the drill press), first panel glue up, first time I've worked with 8/4 material… the list goes on. First and foremost - this is the first piece of furniture I've ever tried to build, so I'm happy as long as I finish it somehow :)
When I say butcher block, I was thinking of doing an edge-grain version - not the end-grain version. Now, however, I'm considering scraping that completely and just doing an edge-glued panel for the top.

As for the shelf, I thought of expansion, but wasn't too worried about it. Like I said in an earlier post, I've seen tables with a similar design and assumed the legs would bow out with enough flexibility to handle the cross-grain expansion. I was considering just gluing the stretchers at the top and letting the grooves hold the shelf in place without glue. The shelf is made of edge-glued poplar boards, with the grain reversed for the middle panel to help avoid cupping.
 
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Mostly Done Except for the Top

Here's the dry-fit, the tape's on there to keep it from falling apart when I adjust things/check for square. All the stretchers have been resized to match the shelf size:




Here's a detail of how the leg holds the shelf:



I still need to clean that up a little since there's a bit of a gap on all 4 legs, which means I may need to trim a little off the stretchers again (maybe just 1/16" or so from each end).

As for the top, I know this is supposed to be a butcher-block table, but I'm seriously considering just making a flat panel for the top instead, since all I have is poplar currently. My other option (since I do have a little maple left) was to make a butcher block top out of alternating pieces of maple/poplar. I figure the top will be removable with buttons, so if I made it out of some combination of poplar I could always remove it in the future and put a more durable top on it if I actually wanted to use it for cutting/etc.

I'm not really beholden to the original design (I've already scrapped the middle shelf), since this is all a learning experience for me. This piece is a first for me on many levels: first mortise/tenon joints (mortises hand cut, well at least after I used the drill press), first panel glue up, first time I've worked with 8/4 material… the list goes on. First and foremost - this is the first piece of furniture I've ever tried to build, so I'm happy as long as I finish it somehow :)
Nice looking table.
 
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