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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Pleasing the Customer

I always enjoy reading project blogs here on LJ, so I've decided to attempt one myself. Hopefully some folks will find it enjoyable!

I've built a few beds over the past years, the most recent being this one that my son uses:

Furniture Property Comfort Window Wood


It's solid maple and has been beat up a little over the years and acquired glow-in-the-dark stars, all of which adds to its character, and I don't mind in the least. I like that the bed has been host to both my children and that they've felt free to customize it. The finials on the bedposts remove, and there are special finials for Halloween and Christmas and so on.

Truth be told I probably owe my wife a bed next, but I've skipped over her to do one for my daughter, mostly because she's in high school now and I can foresee the day when she won't be around the house anymore. She's always been the sort of person who likes to curl up in a nook with a book, to be enclosed and cozy. So it seemed natural to make a built-in bed for her.

There are a number of remarkable built-in beds out on the Web. I particularly enjoyed perusing the galleries at these links:

http://willowdecor.blogspot.com/2008/11/built-in-beds_16.html
http://pinkwallpaper.blogspot.com/2009/08/love-my-parents.html

Although my daughter and I both found a number of built-ins that we liked, we ended up settling on one my wife found in a magazine:

Property Furniture Decoration Interior design Toy


To my eye, this is a simple but wonderful design. The lines are clean and the proportions well-balanced. It also has some interesting design elements-particularly the 2 inch thick sides and shelves. To my eye, it's a little "over-tall" but as it happens our ceilings are lower (8') so that proportion will naturally be more balanced. However, I can't simply build something that I like-I have to please my customers, after all. So after some consultations with my client, we ended up with a somewhat modified design that added real drawers to the bookshelves and a valance with curtains. Here's the Sketchup drawing we ended with:

Furniture Chair Table Rectangle Parallel


I elaborated that Sketchup model a little bit (although I never took it to a fully detailed plan) and then blew it up into component parts to get a handle on the scope of the project and to make it easier to feed it into the Cut-List plugin. It took me a bit of work to fully understand the Cut-List plugin, but I exchanged a few emails with Steve, who was very helpful and patient. Excellent customer service!

Font Rectangle Logo Brand Graphics


Probably the most interesting problem at this stage is how to make the 2 inch thick sides. Anything solid that thick at that size is going to be immensely heavy, but at the same time the sides need to be substantial enough to anchor the built-in and allow the mounting of lamps and shelves. I contemplated a number of different approaches, and settled on making a sandwich of two layers of 1/2 plywood with a layer of 1/2 spacers in-between. That yields 1 1/2" and should be (somewhat) less heavy. We'll see. I'm curious whether anyone else has faced a similar problem and what solution they settled on… Please leave a comment!

The wood is all acquired from the local Big Box Lumber Store, although I had to special order the birch-sided 1/2" plywood. (I was able to order C3 grade and save a little money, since the whole thing will be painted.) That all came in today and has been transferred to the workshop-in this case, our garage:

Table Couch Wood studio couch Flooring


My normal "workshop" is about a 10'x10' space in the basement and would not accommodate a project this size. For the same reason I lack a table saw and some other useful tools. You may be able to make out a circular saw cutting jig on the top of the wood pile. It's resting on a hard foam panel. Together that's my setup for cutting the plywood-the foam panel goes underneath the plywood to be cut, supporting it and providing some tearout protection. The foam panel idea is something I picked up off the Interwebs, and it's a really great tip-much, much better than trying to cut on horses or 2×4s. I also invested in a new 40 tooth blade for the circular saw, so I'm hoping my edges won't be too ragged. (I picked up an 80 tooth blade for the miter saw as well.)

The plan for the rest of the weekend is to assemble one of the large panels.
 

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Pleasing the Customer

I always enjoy reading project blogs here on LJ, so I've decided to attempt one myself. Hopefully some folks will find it enjoyable!

I've built a few beds over the past years, the most recent being this one that my son uses:

Furniture Property Comfort Window Wood


It's solid maple and has been beat up a little over the years and acquired glow-in-the-dark stars, all of which adds to its character, and I don't mind in the least. I like that the bed has been host to both my children and that they've felt free to customize it. The finials on the bedposts remove, and there are special finials for Halloween and Christmas and so on.

Truth be told I probably owe my wife a bed next, but I've skipped over her to do one for my daughter, mostly because she's in high school now and I can foresee the day when she won't be around the house anymore. She's always been the sort of person who likes to curl up in a nook with a book, to be enclosed and cozy. So it seemed natural to make a built-in bed for her.

There are a number of remarkable built-in beds out on the Web. I particularly enjoyed perusing the galleries at these links:

http://willowdecor.blogspot.com/2008/11/built-in-beds_16.html
http://pinkwallpaper.blogspot.com/2009/08/love-my-parents.html

Although my daughter and I both found a number of built-ins that we liked, we ended up settling on one my wife found in a magazine:

Property Furniture Decoration Interior design Toy


To my eye, this is a simple but wonderful design. The lines are clean and the proportions well-balanced. It also has some interesting design elements-particularly the 2 inch thick sides and shelves. To my eye, it's a little "over-tall" but as it happens our ceilings are lower (8') so that proportion will naturally be more balanced. However, I can't simply build something that I like-I have to please my customers, after all. So after some consultations with my client, we ended up with a somewhat modified design that added real drawers to the bookshelves and a valance with curtains. Here's the Sketchup drawing we ended with:

Furniture Chair Table Rectangle Parallel


I elaborated that Sketchup model a little bit (although I never took it to a fully detailed plan) and then blew it up into component parts to get a handle on the scope of the project and to make it easier to feed it into the Cut-List plugin. It took me a bit of work to fully understand the Cut-List plugin, but I exchanged a few emails with Steve, who was very helpful and patient. Excellent customer service!

Font Rectangle Logo Brand Graphics


Probably the most interesting problem at this stage is how to make the 2 inch thick sides. Anything solid that thick at that size is going to be immensely heavy, but at the same time the sides need to be substantial enough to anchor the built-in and allow the mounting of lamps and shelves. I contemplated a number of different approaches, and settled on making a sandwich of two layers of 1/2 plywood with a layer of 1/2 spacers in-between. That yields 1 1/2" and should be (somewhat) less heavy. We'll see. I'm curious whether anyone else has faced a similar problem and what solution they settled on… Please leave a comment!

The wood is all acquired from the local Big Box Lumber Store, although I had to special order the birch-sided 1/2" plywood. (I was able to order C3 grade and save a little money, since the whole thing will be painted.) That all came in today and has been transferred to the workshop-in this case, our garage:

Table Couch Wood studio couch Flooring


My normal "workshop" is about a 10'x10' space in the basement and would not accommodate a project this size. For the same reason I lack a table saw and some other useful tools. You may be able to make out a circular saw cutting jig on the top of the wood pile. It's resting on a hard foam panel. Together that's my setup for cutting the plywood-the foam panel goes underneath the plywood to be cut, supporting it and providing some tearout protection. The foam panel idea is something I picked up off the Interwebs, and it's a really great tip-much, much better than trying to cut on horses or 2×4s. I also invested in a new 40 tooth blade for the circular saw, so I'm hoping my edges won't be too ragged. (I picked up an 80 tooth blade for the miter saw as well.)

The plan for the rest of the weekend is to assemble one of the large panels.
Good start! I've heard about using foamcore to back a cut like that, but have never tried it myself. I'm looking forward to seeing your progress.
 

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Pleasing the Customer

I always enjoy reading project blogs here on LJ, so I've decided to attempt one myself. Hopefully some folks will find it enjoyable!

I've built a few beds over the past years, the most recent being this one that my son uses:

Furniture Property Comfort Window Wood


It's solid maple and has been beat up a little over the years and acquired glow-in-the-dark stars, all of which adds to its character, and I don't mind in the least. I like that the bed has been host to both my children and that they've felt free to customize it. The finials on the bedposts remove, and there are special finials for Halloween and Christmas and so on.

Truth be told I probably owe my wife a bed next, but I've skipped over her to do one for my daughter, mostly because she's in high school now and I can foresee the day when she won't be around the house anymore. She's always been the sort of person who likes to curl up in a nook with a book, to be enclosed and cozy. So it seemed natural to make a built-in bed for her.

There are a number of remarkable built-in beds out on the Web. I particularly enjoyed perusing the galleries at these links:

http://willowdecor.blogspot.com/2008/11/built-in-beds_16.html
http://pinkwallpaper.blogspot.com/2009/08/love-my-parents.html

Although my daughter and I both found a number of built-ins that we liked, we ended up settling on one my wife found in a magazine:

Property Furniture Decoration Interior design Toy


To my eye, this is a simple but wonderful design. The lines are clean and the proportions well-balanced. It also has some interesting design elements-particularly the 2 inch thick sides and shelves. To my eye, it's a little "over-tall" but as it happens our ceilings are lower (8') so that proportion will naturally be more balanced. However, I can't simply build something that I like-I have to please my customers, after all. So after some consultations with my client, we ended up with a somewhat modified design that added real drawers to the bookshelves and a valance with curtains. Here's the Sketchup drawing we ended with:

Furniture Chair Table Rectangle Parallel


I elaborated that Sketchup model a little bit (although I never took it to a fully detailed plan) and then blew it up into component parts to get a handle on the scope of the project and to make it easier to feed it into the Cut-List plugin. It took me a bit of work to fully understand the Cut-List plugin, but I exchanged a few emails with Steve, who was very helpful and patient. Excellent customer service!

Font Rectangle Logo Brand Graphics


Probably the most interesting problem at this stage is how to make the 2 inch thick sides. Anything solid that thick at that size is going to be immensely heavy, but at the same time the sides need to be substantial enough to anchor the built-in and allow the mounting of lamps and shelves. I contemplated a number of different approaches, and settled on making a sandwich of two layers of 1/2 plywood with a layer of 1/2 spacers in-between. That yields 1 1/2" and should be (somewhat) less heavy. We'll see. I'm curious whether anyone else has faced a similar problem and what solution they settled on… Please leave a comment!

The wood is all acquired from the local Big Box Lumber Store, although I had to special order the birch-sided 1/2" plywood. (I was able to order C3 grade and save a little money, since the whole thing will be painted.) That all came in today and has been transferred to the workshop-in this case, our garage:

Table Couch Wood studio couch Flooring


My normal "workshop" is about a 10'x10' space in the basement and would not accommodate a project this size. For the same reason I lack a table saw and some other useful tools. You may be able to make out a circular saw cutting jig on the top of the wood pile. It's resting on a hard foam panel. Together that's my setup for cutting the plywood-the foam panel goes underneath the plywood to be cut, supporting it and providing some tearout protection. The foam panel idea is something I picked up off the Interwebs, and it's a really great tip-much, much better than trying to cut on horses or 2×4s. I also invested in a new 40 tooth blade for the circular saw, so I'm hoping my edges won't be too ragged. (I picked up an 80 tooth blade for the miter saw as well.)

The plan for the rest of the weekend is to assemble one of the large panels.
Wow.

Sleeping quarters fit for royalty :)
 

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Pleasing the Customer

I always enjoy reading project blogs here on LJ, so I've decided to attempt one myself. Hopefully some folks will find it enjoyable!

I've built a few beds over the past years, the most recent being this one that my son uses:

Furniture Property Comfort Window Wood


It's solid maple and has been beat up a little over the years and acquired glow-in-the-dark stars, all of which adds to its character, and I don't mind in the least. I like that the bed has been host to both my children and that they've felt free to customize it. The finials on the bedposts remove, and there are special finials for Halloween and Christmas and so on.

Truth be told I probably owe my wife a bed next, but I've skipped over her to do one for my daughter, mostly because she's in high school now and I can foresee the day when she won't be around the house anymore. She's always been the sort of person who likes to curl up in a nook with a book, to be enclosed and cozy. So it seemed natural to make a built-in bed for her.

There are a number of remarkable built-in beds out on the Web. I particularly enjoyed perusing the galleries at these links:

http://willowdecor.blogspot.com/2008/11/built-in-beds_16.html
http://pinkwallpaper.blogspot.com/2009/08/love-my-parents.html

Although my daughter and I both found a number of built-ins that we liked, we ended up settling on one my wife found in a magazine:

Property Furniture Decoration Interior design Toy


To my eye, this is a simple but wonderful design. The lines are clean and the proportions well-balanced. It also has some interesting design elements-particularly the 2 inch thick sides and shelves. To my eye, it's a little "over-tall" but as it happens our ceilings are lower (8') so that proportion will naturally be more balanced. However, I can't simply build something that I like-I have to please my customers, after all. So after some consultations with my client, we ended up with a somewhat modified design that added real drawers to the bookshelves and a valance with curtains. Here's the Sketchup drawing we ended with:

Furniture Chair Table Rectangle Parallel


I elaborated that Sketchup model a little bit (although I never took it to a fully detailed plan) and then blew it up into component parts to get a handle on the scope of the project and to make it easier to feed it into the Cut-List plugin. It took me a bit of work to fully understand the Cut-List plugin, but I exchanged a few emails with Steve, who was very helpful and patient. Excellent customer service!

Font Rectangle Logo Brand Graphics


Probably the most interesting problem at this stage is how to make the 2 inch thick sides. Anything solid that thick at that size is going to be immensely heavy, but at the same time the sides need to be substantial enough to anchor the built-in and allow the mounting of lamps and shelves. I contemplated a number of different approaches, and settled on making a sandwich of two layers of 1/2 plywood with a layer of 1/2 spacers in-between. That yields 1 1/2" and should be (somewhat) less heavy. We'll see. I'm curious whether anyone else has faced a similar problem and what solution they settled on… Please leave a comment!

The wood is all acquired from the local Big Box Lumber Store, although I had to special order the birch-sided 1/2" plywood. (I was able to order C3 grade and save a little money, since the whole thing will be painted.) That all came in today and has been transferred to the workshop-in this case, our garage:

Table Couch Wood studio couch Flooring


My normal "workshop" is about a 10'x10' space in the basement and would not accommodate a project this size. For the same reason I lack a table saw and some other useful tools. You may be able to make out a circular saw cutting jig on the top of the wood pile. It's resting on a hard foam panel. Together that's my setup for cutting the plywood-the foam panel goes underneath the plywood to be cut, supporting it and providing some tearout protection. The foam panel idea is something I picked up off the Interwebs, and it's a really great tip-much, much better than trying to cut on horses or 2×4s. I also invested in a new 40 tooth blade for the circular saw, so I'm hoping my edges won't be too ragged. (I picked up an 80 tooth blade for the miter saw as well.)

The plan for the rest of the weekend is to assemble one of the large panels.
Great job
 

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Pleasing the Customer

I always enjoy reading project blogs here on LJ, so I've decided to attempt one myself. Hopefully some folks will find it enjoyable!

I've built a few beds over the past years, the most recent being this one that my son uses:

Furniture Property Comfort Window Wood


It's solid maple and has been beat up a little over the years and acquired glow-in-the-dark stars, all of which adds to its character, and I don't mind in the least. I like that the bed has been host to both my children and that they've felt free to customize it. The finials on the bedposts remove, and there are special finials for Halloween and Christmas and so on.

Truth be told I probably owe my wife a bed next, but I've skipped over her to do one for my daughter, mostly because she's in high school now and I can foresee the day when she won't be around the house anymore. She's always been the sort of person who likes to curl up in a nook with a book, to be enclosed and cozy. So it seemed natural to make a built-in bed for her.

There are a number of remarkable built-in beds out on the Web. I particularly enjoyed perusing the galleries at these links:

http://willowdecor.blogspot.com/2008/11/built-in-beds_16.html
http://pinkwallpaper.blogspot.com/2009/08/love-my-parents.html

Although my daughter and I both found a number of built-ins that we liked, we ended up settling on one my wife found in a magazine:

Property Furniture Decoration Interior design Toy


To my eye, this is a simple but wonderful design. The lines are clean and the proportions well-balanced. It also has some interesting design elements-particularly the 2 inch thick sides and shelves. To my eye, it's a little "over-tall" but as it happens our ceilings are lower (8') so that proportion will naturally be more balanced. However, I can't simply build something that I like-I have to please my customers, after all. So after some consultations with my client, we ended up with a somewhat modified design that added real drawers to the bookshelves and a valance with curtains. Here's the Sketchup drawing we ended with:

Furniture Chair Table Rectangle Parallel


I elaborated that Sketchup model a little bit (although I never took it to a fully detailed plan) and then blew it up into component parts to get a handle on the scope of the project and to make it easier to feed it into the Cut-List plugin. It took me a bit of work to fully understand the Cut-List plugin, but I exchanged a few emails with Steve, who was very helpful and patient. Excellent customer service!

Font Rectangle Logo Brand Graphics


Probably the most interesting problem at this stage is how to make the 2 inch thick sides. Anything solid that thick at that size is going to be immensely heavy, but at the same time the sides need to be substantial enough to anchor the built-in and allow the mounting of lamps and shelves. I contemplated a number of different approaches, and settled on making a sandwich of two layers of 1/2 plywood with a layer of 1/2 spacers in-between. That yields 1 1/2" and should be (somewhat) less heavy. We'll see. I'm curious whether anyone else has faced a similar problem and what solution they settled on… Please leave a comment!

The wood is all acquired from the local Big Box Lumber Store, although I had to special order the birch-sided 1/2" plywood. (I was able to order C3 grade and save a little money, since the whole thing will be painted.) That all came in today and has been transferred to the workshop-in this case, our garage:

Table Couch Wood studio couch Flooring


My normal "workshop" is about a 10'x10' space in the basement and would not accommodate a project this size. For the same reason I lack a table saw and some other useful tools. You may be able to make out a circular saw cutting jig on the top of the wood pile. It's resting on a hard foam panel. Together that's my setup for cutting the plywood-the foam panel goes underneath the plywood to be cut, supporting it and providing some tearout protection. The foam panel idea is something I picked up off the Interwebs, and it's a really great tip-much, much better than trying to cut on horses or 2×4s. I also invested in a new 40 tooth blade for the circular saw, so I'm hoping my edges won't be too ragged. (I picked up an 80 tooth blade for the miter saw as well.)

The plan for the rest of the weekend is to assemble one of the large panels.
Great start. Thanks for the tip on the foam panel. Never seen that.
 

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Pleasing the Customer

I always enjoy reading project blogs here on LJ, so I've decided to attempt one myself. Hopefully some folks will find it enjoyable!

I've built a few beds over the past years, the most recent being this one that my son uses:

Furniture Property Comfort Window Wood


It's solid maple and has been beat up a little over the years and acquired glow-in-the-dark stars, all of which adds to its character, and I don't mind in the least. I like that the bed has been host to both my children and that they've felt free to customize it. The finials on the bedposts remove, and there are special finials for Halloween and Christmas and so on.

Truth be told I probably owe my wife a bed next, but I've skipped over her to do one for my daughter, mostly because she's in high school now and I can foresee the day when she won't be around the house anymore. She's always been the sort of person who likes to curl up in a nook with a book, to be enclosed and cozy. So it seemed natural to make a built-in bed for her.

There are a number of remarkable built-in beds out on the Web. I particularly enjoyed perusing the galleries at these links:

http://willowdecor.blogspot.com/2008/11/built-in-beds_16.html
http://pinkwallpaper.blogspot.com/2009/08/love-my-parents.html

Although my daughter and I both found a number of built-ins that we liked, we ended up settling on one my wife found in a magazine:

Property Furniture Decoration Interior design Toy


To my eye, this is a simple but wonderful design. The lines are clean and the proportions well-balanced. It also has some interesting design elements-particularly the 2 inch thick sides and shelves. To my eye, it's a little "over-tall" but as it happens our ceilings are lower (8') so that proportion will naturally be more balanced. However, I can't simply build something that I like-I have to please my customers, after all. So after some consultations with my client, we ended up with a somewhat modified design that added real drawers to the bookshelves and a valance with curtains. Here's the Sketchup drawing we ended with:

Furniture Chair Table Rectangle Parallel


I elaborated that Sketchup model a little bit (although I never took it to a fully detailed plan) and then blew it up into component parts to get a handle on the scope of the project and to make it easier to feed it into the Cut-List plugin. It took me a bit of work to fully understand the Cut-List plugin, but I exchanged a few emails with Steve, who was very helpful and patient. Excellent customer service!

Font Rectangle Logo Brand Graphics


Probably the most interesting problem at this stage is how to make the 2 inch thick sides. Anything solid that thick at that size is going to be immensely heavy, but at the same time the sides need to be substantial enough to anchor the built-in and allow the mounting of lamps and shelves. I contemplated a number of different approaches, and settled on making a sandwich of two layers of 1/2 plywood with a layer of 1/2 spacers in-between. That yields 1 1/2" and should be (somewhat) less heavy. We'll see. I'm curious whether anyone else has faced a similar problem and what solution they settled on… Please leave a comment!

The wood is all acquired from the local Big Box Lumber Store, although I had to special order the birch-sided 1/2" plywood. (I was able to order C3 grade and save a little money, since the whole thing will be painted.) That all came in today and has been transferred to the workshop-in this case, our garage:

Table Couch Wood studio couch Flooring


My normal "workshop" is about a 10'x10' space in the basement and would not accommodate a project this size. For the same reason I lack a table saw and some other useful tools. You may be able to make out a circular saw cutting jig on the top of the wood pile. It's resting on a hard foam panel. Together that's my setup for cutting the plywood-the foam panel goes underneath the plywood to be cut, supporting it and providing some tearout protection. The foam panel idea is something I picked up off the Interwebs, and it's a really great tip-much, much better than trying to cut on horses or 2×4s. I also invested in a new 40 tooth blade for the circular saw, so I'm hoping my edges won't be too ragged. (I picked up an 80 tooth blade for the miter saw as well.)

The plan for the rest of the weekend is to assemble one of the large panels.
Your modified design is a significant improvement! I am looking forward to following your story. I have used masking tape to limit rough edges on plywood - works pretty well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Pleasing the Customer

I always enjoy reading project blogs here on LJ, so I've decided to attempt one myself. Hopefully some folks will find it enjoyable!

I've built a few beds over the past years, the most recent being this one that my son uses:

Furniture Property Comfort Window Wood


It's solid maple and has been beat up a little over the years and acquired glow-in-the-dark stars, all of which adds to its character, and I don't mind in the least. I like that the bed has been host to both my children and that they've felt free to customize it. The finials on the bedposts remove, and there are special finials for Halloween and Christmas and so on.

Truth be told I probably owe my wife a bed next, but I've skipped over her to do one for my daughter, mostly because she's in high school now and I can foresee the day when she won't be around the house anymore. She's always been the sort of person who likes to curl up in a nook with a book, to be enclosed and cozy. So it seemed natural to make a built-in bed for her.

There are a number of remarkable built-in beds out on the Web. I particularly enjoyed perusing the galleries at these links:

http://willowdecor.blogspot.com/2008/11/built-in-beds_16.html
http://pinkwallpaper.blogspot.com/2009/08/love-my-parents.html

Although my daughter and I both found a number of built-ins that we liked, we ended up settling on one my wife found in a magazine:

Property Furniture Decoration Interior design Toy


To my eye, this is a simple but wonderful design. The lines are clean and the proportions well-balanced. It also has some interesting design elements-particularly the 2 inch thick sides and shelves. To my eye, it's a little "over-tall" but as it happens our ceilings are lower (8') so that proportion will naturally be more balanced. However, I can't simply build something that I like-I have to please my customers, after all. So after some consultations with my client, we ended up with a somewhat modified design that added real drawers to the bookshelves and a valance with curtains. Here's the Sketchup drawing we ended with:

Furniture Chair Table Rectangle Parallel


I elaborated that Sketchup model a little bit (although I never took it to a fully detailed plan) and then blew it up into component parts to get a handle on the scope of the project and to make it easier to feed it into the Cut-List plugin. It took me a bit of work to fully understand the Cut-List plugin, but I exchanged a few emails with Steve, who was very helpful and patient. Excellent customer service!

Font Rectangle Logo Brand Graphics


Probably the most interesting problem at this stage is how to make the 2 inch thick sides. Anything solid that thick at that size is going to be immensely heavy, but at the same time the sides need to be substantial enough to anchor the built-in and allow the mounting of lamps and shelves. I contemplated a number of different approaches, and settled on making a sandwich of two layers of 1/2 plywood with a layer of 1/2 spacers in-between. That yields 1 1/2" and should be (somewhat) less heavy. We'll see. I'm curious whether anyone else has faced a similar problem and what solution they settled on… Please leave a comment!

The wood is all acquired from the local Big Box Lumber Store, although I had to special order the birch-sided 1/2" plywood. (I was able to order C3 grade and save a little money, since the whole thing will be painted.) That all came in today and has been transferred to the workshop-in this case, our garage:

Table Couch Wood studio couch Flooring


My normal "workshop" is about a 10'x10' space in the basement and would not accommodate a project this size. For the same reason I lack a table saw and some other useful tools. You may be able to make out a circular saw cutting jig on the top of the wood pile. It's resting on a hard foam panel. Together that's my setup for cutting the plywood-the foam panel goes underneath the plywood to be cut, supporting it and providing some tearout protection. The foam panel idea is something I picked up off the Interwebs, and it's a really great tip-much, much better than trying to cut on horses or 2×4s. I also invested in a new 40 tooth blade for the circular saw, so I'm hoping my edges won't be too ragged. (I picked up an 80 tooth blade for the miter saw as well.)

The plan for the rest of the weekend is to assemble one of the large panels.
So far I haven't had any problems with tearout on the plywood panels. The first couple of cuts I did do blue tape front and back but it didn't seem necessary so I've stopped. I am using a brand-new 40 tooth blade in my circular saw, so that probably helps. I considered getting a 120 tooth plywood blade, but it seemed like overkill, and I was concerned how effective it would be on 1/2" plywood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
SUDO: Make Me a Sandwich

(The Story So Far: Our Hero is constructing a built-in bed for his daughter, with inadequate tools and woodworking experience.)

As mentioned in my previous post, one of the challenges of this project is to construct the large, 1 1/2" thick panels that make up the bed sides. These panels are 96" tall and 58" wide, so they cannot be cut from a single sheet of plywood. (The built-in is sized to fit a full size mattress.) They are intended to be 1 1/2" thick, so I have decided to make them with two 1/2" plywood sides and some 1/2" plywood spacers, as illustrated here:

Wood Rectangle Font Flooring Hardwood


I have to admit that when I picked up the hard foam insulation sheet (which I'm using as a sacrificial support when cutting the plywood) I was tempted to make the sandwich with a foam sheet on the inside. But there are a couple of problems with that approach. First, making the "extension" to reach the required 58" width would have been difficult; obviously the foam couldn't be counted on for structural support. Second, I don't really have the equipment to do the full sheet glue up that would be required. I could certainly rig some weights up and press the sandwich together, but I dubious that I could keep things centered and eliminate voids.

My plan to make the plywood sandwiches was to use screws. For one skin I can screw the skin to the spacers from the spacer side. For the other skin I have to put screws into the skin, but this will eventually be painted so that's not too terrible-spackle over the screws and paint it up. In the event, this worked fairly well, although I used a lot more screws than I thought I would have to use. Even on the first skin, I ended up having to screw down the "extension" to avoid a noticeable seam.

Here's what that ended up looking like. You can see the row of screws along the extension edge:

Light Wood Rectangle Floor Flooring


I forget to snap any pictures while the spacer skeleton was visible; I'll do that on the next panel.

Another tricky bit for this panel was the knee curve. It's a 12" radius curve, so I made a template out of some extra 1/4" plywood I had laying around. (I drew the curve freehand with a 12" string attached to a pencil and then cut it out as carefully as I could with a jigsaw.) I cut the straight edges of the panel skins with the circular saw down to where the curve started, and then finished the curve with a jigsaw. I also ended up cutting a curved 12×12 inch spacer piece. When everything was put together, the straight edge along the top front of the panel and the horizontal top edge lined up very well. The bottom front edge didn't line up quite so well, so I took an 1/8" off the front with the circular saw and fence after it was glued up to even up that edge. The curve is also a bit of a mess, and I'll probably have to go over it with a router and a trim bit to get it consistent. (I'm afraid if I take a rasp to it I'll tear out the edges.)

The last step was to glue on a 3/4" facing to the bottom front edge. I got started on that and discovered that my pipe clamps didn't quite reach the full width of the panel. That led to this kludged up arrangement:

Wood Musical instrument accessory Composite material Gas Tool


I haven't taken it apart yet, but it looked like it made for a solid glue-up, even though I wasn't able to use a lot of clamping pressure. In retrospect I thought I should have clamped the 2×4 to the far edge in addition to clamping it down.
 

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SUDO: Make Me a Sandwich

(The Story So Far: Our Hero is constructing a built-in bed for his daughter, with inadequate tools and woodworking experience.)

As mentioned in my previous post, one of the challenges of this project is to construct the large, 1 1/2" thick panels that make up the bed sides. These panels are 96" tall and 58" wide, so they cannot be cut from a single sheet of plywood. (The built-in is sized to fit a full size mattress.) They are intended to be 1 1/2" thick, so I have decided to make them with two 1/2" plywood sides and some 1/2" plywood spacers, as illustrated here:

Wood Rectangle Font Flooring Hardwood


I have to admit that when I picked up the hard foam insulation sheet (which I'm using as a sacrificial support when cutting the plywood) I was tempted to make the sandwich with a foam sheet on the inside. But there are a couple of problems with that approach. First, making the "extension" to reach the required 58" width would have been difficult; obviously the foam couldn't be counted on for structural support. Second, I don't really have the equipment to do the full sheet glue up that would be required. I could certainly rig some weights up and press the sandwich together, but I dubious that I could keep things centered and eliminate voids.

My plan to make the plywood sandwiches was to use screws. For one skin I can screw the skin to the spacers from the spacer side. For the other skin I have to put screws into the skin, but this will eventually be painted so that's not too terrible-spackle over the screws and paint it up. In the event, this worked fairly well, although I used a lot more screws than I thought I would have to use. Even on the first skin, I ended up having to screw down the "extension" to avoid a noticeable seam.

Here's what that ended up looking like. You can see the row of screws along the extension edge:

Light Wood Rectangle Floor Flooring


I forget to snap any pictures while the spacer skeleton was visible; I'll do that on the next panel.

Another tricky bit for this panel was the knee curve. It's a 12" radius curve, so I made a template out of some extra 1/4" plywood I had laying around. (I drew the curve freehand with a 12" string attached to a pencil and then cut it out as carefully as I could with a jigsaw.) I cut the straight edges of the panel skins with the circular saw down to where the curve started, and then finished the curve with a jigsaw. I also ended up cutting a curved 12×12 inch spacer piece. When everything was put together, the straight edge along the top front of the panel and the horizontal top edge lined up very well. The bottom front edge didn't line up quite so well, so I took an 1/8" off the front with the circular saw and fence after it was glued up to even up that edge. The curve is also a bit of a mess, and I'll probably have to go over it with a router and a trim bit to get it consistent. (I'm afraid if I take a rasp to it I'll tear out the edges.)

The last step was to glue on a 3/4" facing to the bottom front edge. I got started on that and discovered that my pipe clamps didn't quite reach the full width of the panel. That led to this kludged up arrangement:

Wood Musical instrument accessory Composite material Gas Tool


I haven't taken it apart yet, but it looked like it made for a solid glue-up, even though I wasn't able to use a lot of clamping pressure. In retrospect I thought I should have clamped the 2×4 to the far edge in addition to clamping it down.
Love the title of the post and it looks like a great project. Good luck with it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
SUDO: Make Me a Sandwich

(The Story So Far: Our Hero is constructing a built-in bed for his daughter, with inadequate tools and woodworking experience.)

As mentioned in my previous post, one of the challenges of this project is to construct the large, 1 1/2" thick panels that make up the bed sides. These panels are 96" tall and 58" wide, so they cannot be cut from a single sheet of plywood. (The built-in is sized to fit a full size mattress.) They are intended to be 1 1/2" thick, so I have decided to make them with two 1/2" plywood sides and some 1/2" plywood spacers, as illustrated here:

Wood Rectangle Font Flooring Hardwood


I have to admit that when I picked up the hard foam insulation sheet (which I'm using as a sacrificial support when cutting the plywood) I was tempted to make the sandwich with a foam sheet on the inside. But there are a couple of problems with that approach. First, making the "extension" to reach the required 58" width would have been difficult; obviously the foam couldn't be counted on for structural support. Second, I don't really have the equipment to do the full sheet glue up that would be required. I could certainly rig some weights up and press the sandwich together, but I dubious that I could keep things centered and eliminate voids.

My plan to make the plywood sandwiches was to use screws. For one skin I can screw the skin to the spacers from the spacer side. For the other skin I have to put screws into the skin, but this will eventually be painted so that's not too terrible-spackle over the screws and paint it up. In the event, this worked fairly well, although I used a lot more screws than I thought I would have to use. Even on the first skin, I ended up having to screw down the "extension" to avoid a noticeable seam.

Here's what that ended up looking like. You can see the row of screws along the extension edge:

Light Wood Rectangle Floor Flooring


I forget to snap any pictures while the spacer skeleton was visible; I'll do that on the next panel.

Another tricky bit for this panel was the knee curve. It's a 12" radius curve, so I made a template out of some extra 1/4" plywood I had laying around. (I drew the curve freehand with a 12" string attached to a pencil and then cut it out as carefully as I could with a jigsaw.) I cut the straight edges of the panel skins with the circular saw down to where the curve started, and then finished the curve with a jigsaw. I also ended up cutting a curved 12×12 inch spacer piece. When everything was put together, the straight edge along the top front of the panel and the horizontal top edge lined up very well. The bottom front edge didn't line up quite so well, so I took an 1/8" off the front with the circular saw and fence after it was glued up to even up that edge. The curve is also a bit of a mess, and I'll probably have to go over it with a router and a trim bit to get it consistent. (I'm afraid if I take a rasp to it I'll tear out the edges.)

The last step was to glue on a 3/4" facing to the bottom front edge. I got started on that and discovered that my pipe clamps didn't quite reach the full width of the panel. That led to this kludged up arrangement:

Wood Musical instrument accessory Composite material Gas Tool


I haven't taken it apart yet, but it looked like it made for a solid glue-up, even though I wasn't able to use a lot of clamping pressure. In retrospect I thought I should have clamped the 2×4 to the far edge in addition to clamping it down.
Yes, that title might go over the heads of the non-geeks :)

http://www.techyouruniverse.com/funny/sudo-make-me-a-sandwhich
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
All These Sandwiches Are Making Me Hungry

With one large panel built-up (if not finished), I moved on to the other panel of the same end. This is essentially just a 24"x96" bookshelf side, although like the large panel it is made up of a sandwich of two 1/2" sheets of birch-sided plywood with 1/2" plywood spacers in between. This shows what the sandwich looked like just before gluing on the second face:

Wood Rectangle Flooring Hardwood Composite material


I fastened the second face of the large panel on with screws through the face. For this one I decided to see if I could simply glue it on and weight it down. I slathered on the glue, mated the faces, and then taped all the corners with masking tape hoping to keep them from sliding out of alignment when I piled on the weight. Then I put the rest of the plywood as well as the large panel on top and left it to dry overnight.

While the glue was drying I zipped down to the workshop and put in some time on the "other" ongoing project:

Wood Tableware Apple beer Beer Hardwood


Meanwhile, the large panel needed to have the numerous screw holes spackled so that it could be sanded and painted. Here I enlisted the customer for some "sweat equity" and put her to work spackling up the numerous holes. We're using the keen new spackle that goes on pink and dries white. Science is wonderful.

Window Wood Flooring Floor Building


When the glue-up had dried on the other panel I unweighted it and took a look to see how it had worked out. The good news was that the panel hadn't slipped and was lined up very nicely. The bad news was that the glue-up wasn't very even-in a number of spots there was about a 1/16" gap:

Wood Hardwood Wood stain Wire Composite material


I'm not too worried about gapping this small, because the only edge is going to be faced with 1×2, which is slightly oversized for the edge and will cover any gap. So I ran the circular saw down the glued-up edge to get a nice even surface and glued on the face:

Wood Table Flooring Wood stain Road surface


Interestingly, I took the tape measure to both panels and it appears that the smaller panel is slightly undersized to the large panel (about 23 3/4" wide instead of the intended 24" wide). Cutting the larger panel down to match the smaller panel will give me a nice edge for veneering I'm going to do on that piece, and make things match up exactly, but it will require me to rework the knee curve. I'm going to have to do some work on the knee curve anyway, so I think I'll do this. But that's a job for tomorrow.
 

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All These Sandwiches Are Making Me Hungry

With one large panel built-up (if not finished), I moved on to the other panel of the same end. This is essentially just a 24"x96" bookshelf side, although like the large panel it is made up of a sandwich of two 1/2" sheets of birch-sided plywood with 1/2" plywood spacers in between. This shows what the sandwich looked like just before gluing on the second face:

Wood Rectangle Flooring Hardwood Composite material


I fastened the second face of the large panel on with screws through the face. For this one I decided to see if I could simply glue it on and weight it down. I slathered on the glue, mated the faces, and then taped all the corners with masking tape hoping to keep them from sliding out of alignment when I piled on the weight. Then I put the rest of the plywood as well as the large panel on top and left it to dry overnight.

While the glue was drying I zipped down to the workshop and put in some time on the "other" ongoing project:

Wood Tableware Apple beer Beer Hardwood


Meanwhile, the large panel needed to have the numerous screw holes spackled so that it could be sanded and painted. Here I enlisted the customer for some "sweat equity" and put her to work spackling up the numerous holes. We're using the keen new spackle that goes on pink and dries white. Science is wonderful.

Window Wood Flooring Floor Building


When the glue-up had dried on the other panel I unweighted it and took a look to see how it had worked out. The good news was that the panel hadn't slipped and was lined up very nicely. The bad news was that the glue-up wasn't very even-in a number of spots there was about a 1/16" gap:

Wood Hardwood Wood stain Wire Composite material


I'm not too worried about gapping this small, because the only edge is going to be faced with 1×2, which is slightly oversized for the edge and will cover any gap. So I ran the circular saw down the glued-up edge to get a nice even surface and glued on the face:

Wood Table Flooring Wood stain Road surface


Interestingly, I took the tape measure to both panels and it appears that the smaller panel is slightly undersized to the large panel (about 23 3/4" wide instead of the intended 24" wide). Cutting the larger panel down to match the smaller panel will give me a nice edge for veneering I'm going to do on that piece, and make things match up exactly, but it will require me to rework the knee curve. I'm going to have to do some work on the knee curve anyway, so I think I'll do this. But that's a job for tomorrow.
Progressing along nicely - nice to see the "customer" getting involved!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Scraping By

(The Story So Far: Our Hero is constructing a built-in bed for his daughter, with inadequate tools and woodworking experience.)

I've spent the last couple of days finishing up the panels that make up the sides of the bed enclosure and bookshelves.

Part of the effort is to finish the edges so that I can put on face boards or prepare the surface for veneering. The panels are a sandwich of 3 sheets of plywood, so naturally they do not line up perfectly at the edges. The straight edges I could finish up pretty easily with either the saw or hand planes, but the knee curve in the large panels was more difficult. My initial plan was to use the router and some sort of template bit (and I even went so far as to buy a 1.5" bottom bearing trim bit), but that plan ran into a couple of problems. I rarely use my router handheld, and I've never done work with a template before, and it turns out that my Bosch router has some sort of oddball template system. I could have mounted my template on the bottom side of the piece and used the trim bit without a template bearing, but as I was thinking on that I ended up flattening the curve manually with this tool:

Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Gas


I don't know what Kobalt calls this exactly, or even why I originally bought it, but I find it a very useful tool for rough shaping of wood in situations where planes and files are hard to bring to bear. It made pretty short work of scraping out the various bumps in the curve, and then I finished it off with some 80 grit in my random orbit sander.

I also needed to put a rabbet in the back of each panel to accept the back panel of the bookshelves. Again, my original thought was to use the router, but I realized that I could do the rabbet easily with the circular saw. That's partly because of how I built the back of each panel. On the backs of the panels, I recessed the middle sheet of plywood by a half-inch, resulting in a half-inch channel down the back edge of each panel:

Wood Wood stain Plank Hardwood Flooring


The purpose of this channel is to run electrical wiring for the sconce lamps that will eventually be mounted inside the bed enclosure. But the channel also made it easy to cut the rabbet-I just had to take the circular saw and slice a 1/4" off of one of the side sheets of plywood. (In fact, the left side sheet in the picture above has been rabbeted.)

This is where I made my only major mistake in the project (so far): I rabbeted the wrong side of one of the large panels. Grrr… I was afraid of doing that, thought about it several times, marked the orientation of both of the large panels, and still cut the wrong side. At least the error will be at the back of the piece!

I also made a minor mistake in trimming the bottom of one panel. After finishing, I realized that the trim cut was not square. That was really baffling, particularly after I checked my saw and found it square. Eventually I realized that to cut through the full 1.5" of the panel, I had lowered the circular saw to the point where the motor housing rode on top of the rail on my cutting jig, tilting the saw as it was cutting. A useful tip if you're going to be cutting plywood with a circular saw and a jig!

I also measured my daughter's room again and realized that the full 96" panels were not going to fit into her room, where the 96" nominal ceiling is actually about 95" thanks to wooden flooring and so on. So I went back to all four panels and cut them down to 94.5". This was a little trickier than it might sound because I was afraid of hitting a buried screw in the middle of the sandwich, so I had to carefully cut through the top ply, chisel that off and check for screws before completing the cut.

At the end of the night the panels were finished except for painting and application of the veneer trim on the large panels. Progress is being made!
 

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Scraping By

(The Story So Far: Our Hero is constructing a built-in bed for his daughter, with inadequate tools and woodworking experience.)

I've spent the last couple of days finishing up the panels that make up the sides of the bed enclosure and bookshelves.

Part of the effort is to finish the edges so that I can put on face boards or prepare the surface for veneering. The panels are a sandwich of 3 sheets of plywood, so naturally they do not line up perfectly at the edges. The straight edges I could finish up pretty easily with either the saw or hand planes, but the knee curve in the large panels was more difficult. My initial plan was to use the router and some sort of template bit (and I even went so far as to buy a 1.5" bottom bearing trim bit), but that plan ran into a couple of problems. I rarely use my router handheld, and I've never done work with a template before, and it turns out that my Bosch router has some sort of oddball template system. I could have mounted my template on the bottom side of the piece and used the trim bit without a template bearing, but as I was thinking on that I ended up flattening the curve manually with this tool:

Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Gas


I don't know what Kobalt calls this exactly, or even why I originally bought it, but I find it a very useful tool for rough shaping of wood in situations where planes and files are hard to bring to bear. It made pretty short work of scraping out the various bumps in the curve, and then I finished it off with some 80 grit in my random orbit sander.

I also needed to put a rabbet in the back of each panel to accept the back panel of the bookshelves. Again, my original thought was to use the router, but I realized that I could do the rabbet easily with the circular saw. That's partly because of how I built the back of each panel. On the backs of the panels, I recessed the middle sheet of plywood by a half-inch, resulting in a half-inch channel down the back edge of each panel:

Wood Wood stain Plank Hardwood Flooring


The purpose of this channel is to run electrical wiring for the sconce lamps that will eventually be mounted inside the bed enclosure. But the channel also made it easy to cut the rabbet-I just had to take the circular saw and slice a 1/4" off of one of the side sheets of plywood. (In fact, the left side sheet in the picture above has been rabbeted.)

This is where I made my only major mistake in the project (so far): I rabbeted the wrong side of one of the large panels. Grrr… I was afraid of doing that, thought about it several times, marked the orientation of both of the large panels, and still cut the wrong side. At least the error will be at the back of the piece!

I also made a minor mistake in trimming the bottom of one panel. After finishing, I realized that the trim cut was not square. That was really baffling, particularly after I checked my saw and found it square. Eventually I realized that to cut through the full 1.5" of the panel, I had lowered the circular saw to the point where the motor housing rode on top of the rail on my cutting jig, tilting the saw as it was cutting. A useful tip if you're going to be cutting plywood with a circular saw and a jig!

I also measured my daughter's room again and realized that the full 96" panels were not going to fit into her room, where the 96" nominal ceiling is actually about 95" thanks to wooden flooring and so on. So I went back to all four panels and cut them down to 94.5". This was a little trickier than it might sound because I was afraid of hitting a buried screw in the middle of the sandwich, so I had to carefully cut through the top ply, chisel that off and check for screws before completing the cut.

At the end of the night the panels were finished except for painting and application of the veneer trim on the large panels. Progress is being made!
A couple of month ago I bought the hardware for a murphy's bed from Rockler. that bed was to go in the play room along with some bookcases. To make the story short, I screwed up on the mesurement. I got so upset I never did it. Maybe During christmas break.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Scraping By

(The Story So Far: Our Hero is constructing a built-in bed for his daughter, with inadequate tools and woodworking experience.)

I've spent the last couple of days finishing up the panels that make up the sides of the bed enclosure and bookshelves.

Part of the effort is to finish the edges so that I can put on face boards or prepare the surface for veneering. The panels are a sandwich of 3 sheets of plywood, so naturally they do not line up perfectly at the edges. The straight edges I could finish up pretty easily with either the saw or hand planes, but the knee curve in the large panels was more difficult. My initial plan was to use the router and some sort of template bit (and I even went so far as to buy a 1.5" bottom bearing trim bit), but that plan ran into a couple of problems. I rarely use my router handheld, and I've never done work with a template before, and it turns out that my Bosch router has some sort of oddball template system. I could have mounted my template on the bottom side of the piece and used the trim bit without a template bearing, but as I was thinking on that I ended up flattening the curve manually with this tool:

Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Gas


I don't know what Kobalt calls this exactly, or even why I originally bought it, but I find it a very useful tool for rough shaping of wood in situations where planes and files are hard to bring to bear. It made pretty short work of scraping out the various bumps in the curve, and then I finished it off with some 80 grit in my random orbit sander.

I also needed to put a rabbet in the back of each panel to accept the back panel of the bookshelves. Again, my original thought was to use the router, but I realized that I could do the rabbet easily with the circular saw. That's partly because of how I built the back of each panel. On the backs of the panels, I recessed the middle sheet of plywood by a half-inch, resulting in a half-inch channel down the back edge of each panel:

Wood Wood stain Plank Hardwood Flooring


The purpose of this channel is to run electrical wiring for the sconce lamps that will eventually be mounted inside the bed enclosure. But the channel also made it easy to cut the rabbet-I just had to take the circular saw and slice a 1/4" off of one of the side sheets of plywood. (In fact, the left side sheet in the picture above has been rabbeted.)

This is where I made my only major mistake in the project (so far): I rabbeted the wrong side of one of the large panels. Grrr… I was afraid of doing that, thought about it several times, marked the orientation of both of the large panels, and still cut the wrong side. At least the error will be at the back of the piece!

I also made a minor mistake in trimming the bottom of one panel. After finishing, I realized that the trim cut was not square. That was really baffling, particularly after I checked my saw and found it square. Eventually I realized that to cut through the full 1.5" of the panel, I had lowered the circular saw to the point where the motor housing rode on top of the rail on my cutting jig, tilting the saw as it was cutting. A useful tip if you're going to be cutting plywood with a circular saw and a jig!

I also measured my daughter's room again and realized that the full 96" panels were not going to fit into her room, where the 96" nominal ceiling is actually about 95" thanks to wooden flooring and so on. So I went back to all four panels and cut them down to 94.5". This was a little trickier than it might sound because I was afraid of hitting a buried screw in the middle of the sandwich, so I had to carefully cut through the top ply, chisel that off and check for screws before completing the cut.

At the end of the night the panels were finished except for painting and application of the veneer trim on the large panels. Progress is being made!
I seem to always mis-measure or mis-cut or otherwise stumble from my plans, so I have to be a little more accepting :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
A Thin Veneer of Civilization




After work today I headed for the garage/workshop to veneer the plywood edges of the large panels. But first I moved everything to the edges of the garage and swept out the sawdust and shavings. It was a sizable pile (with a few Fall leaves mixed in):

Wood Road surface Floor Fixture Flooring


I trotted it out to the compost bin, which gets plenty of green waste but is always happy for a some atomized wood.



Each of the large panels for the built-in bed has three-ply thick raw edge like so:

Wood Hardwood Wood stain Wire Composite material


Today's project was to veneer these edges. Fortunately 2" edge banding in 8 foot lengths is easily available and perfectly sized for this project. I've never done heat-melt veneering before (or any sort of veneering for that matter), so I was a little nervous. I searched Lumberjocks for tips but didn't find anything particularly enlightening. However, there was a fairly useful page at Joe Woodworker:

Joe Woodworker on Heat-Melt Veneering

Although he's talking about manual glue-up, it seemed to apply equally well to the pre-glued veneers. I used his recommended iron setting of "cotton" with a small amount of steam.

I prepared the veneer by rolling it backwards to flatten it out, and then taped it onto the raw edge with blue painter's tape. I wasn't sure how the tape would react to the iron, but the panel will be painted so I wasn't too worried about ruining the surface. (As it turned out, the tape came off easily but did leave some residue behind.)

Wood Road surface Automotive tire Asphalt Bumper


I then ironed it and rolled it. The blue tape had a secondary benefit of marking out "sections" that I worked in sequence. That was a fairly good approach, although I did have trouble on the knee curve because the iron didn't fit very well along the curve. I managed by using the pointy nose of the iron.

After the ironing, I let the glue set while I took Madame President out for Chinese food.

After dinner, I trimmed the veneer using the Band-It veneer trimmer:



This worked okay, but I found I had to angle the trimmer into the cut to trim close to the wood. If I ran it flat along the wood as suggested it had a tendency to just bend the veneer over instead of cutting it. One side of the trimmer also flexed apart along one of the plastic seams. Overall not a terrible tool (and probably better than I could have done with a mat knife) but one that took a little twiddling to be effective.

The trimmer left some high points, but I was able to take those down fairly easily with my little bullnose plane. The result:

Brown Table Wood Flooring Floor


After trimming there was one loose edge on one of the panels, but I was able to fix that easily by re-ironing in that spot. Overall I'm pretty happy with the result (it being my first attempt at veneering) and it should look fine once it is painted. My wife's comment was "It's as good as Ikea!" which I'm still analyzing :)
 

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A Thin Veneer of Civilization




After work today I headed for the garage/workshop to veneer the plywood edges of the large panels. But first I moved everything to the edges of the garage and swept out the sawdust and shavings. It was a sizable pile (with a few Fall leaves mixed in):

Wood Road surface Floor Fixture Flooring


I trotted it out to the compost bin, which gets plenty of green waste but is always happy for a some atomized wood.



Each of the large panels for the built-in bed has three-ply thick raw edge like so:

Wood Hardwood Wood stain Wire Composite material


Today's project was to veneer these edges. Fortunately 2" edge banding in 8 foot lengths is easily available and perfectly sized for this project. I've never done heat-melt veneering before (or any sort of veneering for that matter), so I was a little nervous. I searched Lumberjocks for tips but didn't find anything particularly enlightening. However, there was a fairly useful page at Joe Woodworker:

Joe Woodworker on Heat-Melt Veneering

Although he's talking about manual glue-up, it seemed to apply equally well to the pre-glued veneers. I used his recommended iron setting of "cotton" with a small amount of steam.

I prepared the veneer by rolling it backwards to flatten it out, and then taped it onto the raw edge with blue painter's tape. I wasn't sure how the tape would react to the iron, but the panel will be painted so I wasn't too worried about ruining the surface. (As it turned out, the tape came off easily but did leave some residue behind.)

Wood Road surface Automotive tire Asphalt Bumper


I then ironed it and rolled it. The blue tape had a secondary benefit of marking out "sections" that I worked in sequence. That was a fairly good approach, although I did have trouble on the knee curve because the iron didn't fit very well along the curve. I managed by using the pointy nose of the iron.

After the ironing, I let the glue set while I took Madame President out for Chinese food.

After dinner, I trimmed the veneer using the Band-It veneer trimmer:



This worked okay, but I found I had to angle the trimmer into the cut to trim close to the wood. If I ran it flat along the wood as suggested it had a tendency to just bend the veneer over instead of cutting it. One side of the trimmer also flexed apart along one of the plastic seams. Overall not a terrible tool (and probably better than I could have done with a mat knife) but one that took a little twiddling to be effective.

The trimmer left some high points, but I was able to take those down fairly easily with my little bullnose plane. The result:

Brown Table Wood Flooring Floor


After trimming there was one loose edge on one of the panels, but I was able to fix that easily by re-ironing in that spot. Overall I'm pretty happy with the result (it being my first attempt at veneering) and it should look fine once it is painted. My wife's comment was "It's as good as Ikea!" which I'm still analyzing :)
Cool stuff. I am making some doll beds soon which won't need veneer, but I had been wondering how the stuff works. Love the design.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
A Thin Veneer of Civilization




After work today I headed for the garage/workshop to veneer the plywood edges of the large panels. But first I moved everything to the edges of the garage and swept out the sawdust and shavings. It was a sizable pile (with a few Fall leaves mixed in):

Wood Road surface Floor Fixture Flooring


I trotted it out to the compost bin, which gets plenty of green waste but is always happy for a some atomized wood.



Each of the large panels for the built-in bed has three-ply thick raw edge like so:

Wood Hardwood Wood stain Wire Composite material


Today's project was to veneer these edges. Fortunately 2" edge banding in 8 foot lengths is easily available and perfectly sized for this project. I've never done heat-melt veneering before (or any sort of veneering for that matter), so I was a little nervous. I searched Lumberjocks for tips but didn't find anything particularly enlightening. However, there was a fairly useful page at Joe Woodworker:

Joe Woodworker on Heat-Melt Veneering

Although he's talking about manual glue-up, it seemed to apply equally well to the pre-glued veneers. I used his recommended iron setting of "cotton" with a small amount of steam.

I prepared the veneer by rolling it backwards to flatten it out, and then taped it onto the raw edge with blue painter's tape. I wasn't sure how the tape would react to the iron, but the panel will be painted so I wasn't too worried about ruining the surface. (As it turned out, the tape came off easily but did leave some residue behind.)

Wood Road surface Automotive tire Asphalt Bumper


I then ironed it and rolled it. The blue tape had a secondary benefit of marking out "sections" that I worked in sequence. That was a fairly good approach, although I did have trouble on the knee curve because the iron didn't fit very well along the curve. I managed by using the pointy nose of the iron.

After the ironing, I let the glue set while I took Madame President out for Chinese food.

After dinner, I trimmed the veneer using the Band-It veneer trimmer:



This worked okay, but I found I had to angle the trimmer into the cut to trim close to the wood. If I ran it flat along the wood as suggested it had a tendency to just bend the veneer over instead of cutting it. One side of the trimmer also flexed apart along one of the plastic seams. Overall not a terrible tool (and probably better than I could have done with a mat knife) but one that took a little twiddling to be effective.

The trimmer left some high points, but I was able to take those down fairly easily with my little bullnose plane. The result:

Brown Table Wood Flooring Floor


After trimming there was one loose edge on one of the panels, but I was able to fix that easily by re-ironing in that spot. Overall I'm pretty happy with the result (it being my first attempt at veneering) and it should look fine once it is painted. My wife's comment was "It's as good as Ikea!" which I'm still analyzing :)
Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Don't Mock Me!

(The Story So Far: Our Hero is constructing a built-in bed for his daughter, with inadequate tools and woodworking experience, and so far has made only a small number of terrible errors, which fortunately he can blame on others.)

Just a short note today, because I haven't had time to make significant progress these last two days. I did get out and trim the two panels that make up one side of the built-in to the same width and cut the top and bottom pieces, as well as the one permanent shelf. That at least let me mock up the fit and look. I had to clamp the large panel to the woodworker's ever-handy aid: the garage door.

Naval architecture Wood Window Floor Wood stain


Hmm, it looks less impressive in a photo than it did in my imagination when I was slaving to build it :). As a reminder, this is what the finished piece will look like:

Furniture Chair Table Rectangle Parallel


So that mock-up is one end, minus the shelves and drawers.
 

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Don't Mock Me!

(The Story So Far: Our Hero is constructing a built-in bed for his daughter, with inadequate tools and woodworking experience, and so far has made only a small number of terrible errors, which fortunately he can blame on others.)

Just a short note today, because I haven't had time to make significant progress these last two days. I did get out and trim the two panels that make up one side of the built-in to the same width and cut the top and bottom pieces, as well as the one permanent shelf. That at least let me mock up the fit and look. I had to clamp the large panel to the woodworker's ever-handy aid: the garage door.

Naval architecture Wood Window Floor Wood stain


Hmm, it looks less impressive in a photo than it did in my imagination when I was slaving to build it :). As a reminder, this is what the finished piece will look like:

Furniture Chair Table Rectangle Parallel


So that mock-up is one end, minus the shelves and drawers.
It should look great! But remember my motto - it's not about the progress, it's about the INTENDED progress!
 

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