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Getting on Target

During the 2015 Plane and Spokeshave Swap, I built a couple of what came to be called Transitional Infill Shooting Planes.



A few people asked for a blog, but there weren't enough pics to really document the build, so it wasn't done. Well, after completing a few other projects, I decided to build one more and will try to do a detailed enough blog that someone else could follow along and build their own shooting plane.

Lets get started.

Gathering materials. First thing is to find a donor transitional plane. These can usually be found very inexpensively where the wood is shot, but the iron parts are salvageable. From this, you will need the frog assembly, frog screws, iron assembly and lever cap.

Wood Ruler Office ruler Rectangle Flooring


For those that don't know, the irons on a transitional are the same as iron bodied planes, but the cap iron has the adjustment hole up higher. If you have a frog, but no iron assembly, you can modify the cap iron from an iron plane by making a second adjustment hole. You'll know the extra hole is there, but it'll be covered by the lever cap when in use.

Any width or brand of iron & frog can work for this build, as long as it uses a screw for the lever cap to provide tension. (There are some out there that have a cross pin and screw cap. That style will not work for this kind of build.) On the first two planes, one had a 2-3/8 Stanley and the other a 2-1/4 Sargent. This build is being done with a 2in wide set from a Union.

Next part needed will be the infill wood. For this build, I'm using a piece of jatoba. The blank needs to start out at least 1-1/2 inches wider than the iron (so 3-1/2 wide for a 2inch iron, 4 inches wide for a 2-3/8 iron) by 1-3/4 thick and a bit longer than the finished piece. This plane will end up about 15 inches long, so I'll start with a rough blank that is at least 18 inches. If you want a fancier look, or just don't have a big enough single piece, feel free to do a laminated blank. Both of the original planes were laminated blanks. The stiffer and heavier the wood, the better off you will be in the end, but any stable hardwood will work.

Next, there are the fasteners. The list for this build is:

Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 steel phillips flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 solid brass slotted flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 2 - #10×1-1/4 slotted round head wood screws (these are for attaching the frog. If you can salvage the screws from the donor transitional, that is probably best, otherwise you'll need to get others)

You'll quickly notice the duplicates in different materials. That is because you want solid brass for the final assembly, but do not want to use the softer metal when doing preliminary work-that is what the steel fasteners are for. Also, make sure to get slotted solid brass, not just brass plated, for the final assembly work. The heads will be ground off and brass plated would look silly. Additionally, the slotted heads are not cut as deep as a phillips. If you try to use brass phillips screws, it's not possible to grind them all the way down to get rid of the dimple.

For the metal, I used precision ground O1 steel. The precision ground costs a bit more than basic flat stock, but is totally worth the extra cost for the time savings and more accurate product. I purchased from Enco, but there are other sellers out there if you prefer to use them.

The base is 3/8 thick by 2 inches wide. The side plate is 1/8 thick and needs to be ~1/2 inch wider than the iron and frog. So for this build, 2-1/2 inches. If using a 2-3/8 set, you'll want 3 inch wide steel. The steel comes in 18in long pieces, so just about the right size. If you are going to build additional planes, buying the 36in long pieces will save quite a bit.

Do yourself a favor and when ordering the metal, order the taps you'll need for the machine screws and a tap extractor, as well. The taps carried by the industrial suppliers are far better quality than those you can find at your local big box or hardware store. The tap extractor will quickly pay for itself when (not if) you break off a tap. Doesn't seem to matter how careful you are, a tap will break at the worst possible time. I like to start with a plug tap and finish off with a bottoming tap.

Note:

If you absolutely do not want to do the metal work, because of fear, lack of tools or time, a perfectly usable all wood shooting plane can be built with the same form and ideas by following the first part of the blog and gluing on a wooden base plate in place of the 3/8 steel. You'd want to use a very strong and hard wood (lignum vitae would be ideal, but there are other species that would work well, too) and would lose the advantages the steel brings, such as added mass and wear resistance (end grain is murderously hard on wooden soles) but would cut construction time down to just a few hours and still have a good tool for occasional use.

OK, if you've made it this far without falling asleep, then congrats, you're well on your way to building one of these:

Rectangle Font Automotive lighting Parallel Motor vehicle


Oh, yeah. I've got a Sketchup file that shows the basic construction. If you are interested in a copy, drop me a PM.

Next installment: Shooting off your mouth
 

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Getting on Target

During the 2015 Plane and Spokeshave Swap, I built a couple of what came to be called Transitional Infill Shooting Planes.



A few people asked for a blog, but there weren't enough pics to really document the build, so it wasn't done. Well, after completing a few other projects, I decided to build one more and will try to do a detailed enough blog that someone else could follow along and build their own shooting plane.

Lets get started.

Gathering materials. First thing is to find a donor transitional plane. These can usually be found very inexpensively where the wood is shot, but the iron parts are salvageable. From this, you will need the frog assembly, frog screws, iron assembly and lever cap.

Wood Ruler Office ruler Rectangle Flooring


For those that don't know, the irons on a transitional are the same as iron bodied planes, but the cap iron has the adjustment hole up higher. If you have a frog, but no iron assembly, you can modify the cap iron from an iron plane by making a second adjustment hole. You'll know the extra hole is there, but it'll be covered by the lever cap when in use.

Any width or brand of iron & frog can work for this build, as long as it uses a screw for the lever cap to provide tension. (There are some out there that have a cross pin and screw cap. That style will not work for this kind of build.) On the first two planes, one had a 2-3/8 Stanley and the other a 2-1/4 Sargent. This build is being done with a 2in wide set from a Union.

Next part needed will be the infill wood. For this build, I'm using a piece of jatoba. The blank needs to start out at least 1-1/2 inches wider than the iron (so 3-1/2 wide for a 2inch iron, 4 inches wide for a 2-3/8 iron) by 1-3/4 thick and a bit longer than the finished piece. This plane will end up about 15 inches long, so I'll start with a rough blank that is at least 18 inches. If you want a fancier look, or just don't have a big enough single piece, feel free to do a laminated blank. Both of the original planes were laminated blanks. The stiffer and heavier the wood, the better off you will be in the end, but any stable hardwood will work.

Next, there are the fasteners. The list for this build is:

Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 steel phillips flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 solid brass slotted flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 2 - #10×1-1/4 slotted round head wood screws (these are for attaching the frog. If you can salvage the screws from the donor transitional, that is probably best, otherwise you'll need to get others)

You'll quickly notice the duplicates in different materials. That is because you want solid brass for the final assembly, but do not want to use the softer metal when doing preliminary work-that is what the steel fasteners are for. Also, make sure to get slotted solid brass, not just brass plated, for the final assembly work. The heads will be ground off and brass plated would look silly. Additionally, the slotted heads are not cut as deep as a phillips. If you try to use brass phillips screws, it's not possible to grind them all the way down to get rid of the dimple.

For the metal, I used precision ground O1 steel. The precision ground costs a bit more than basic flat stock, but is totally worth the extra cost for the time savings and more accurate product. I purchased from Enco, but there are other sellers out there if you prefer to use them.

The base is 3/8 thick by 2 inches wide. The side plate is 1/8 thick and needs to be ~1/2 inch wider than the iron and frog. So for this build, 2-1/2 inches. If using a 2-3/8 set, you'll want 3 inch wide steel. The steel comes in 18in long pieces, so just about the right size. If you are going to build additional planes, buying the 36in long pieces will save quite a bit.

Do yourself a favor and when ordering the metal, order the taps you'll need for the machine screws and a tap extractor, as well. The taps carried by the industrial suppliers are far better quality than those you can find at your local big box or hardware store. The tap extractor will quickly pay for itself when (not if) you break off a tap. Doesn't seem to matter how careful you are, a tap will break at the worst possible time. I like to start with a plug tap and finish off with a bottoming tap.

Note:

If you absolutely do not want to do the metal work, because of fear, lack of tools or time, a perfectly usable all wood shooting plane can be built with the same form and ideas by following the first part of the blog and gluing on a wooden base plate in place of the 3/8 steel. You'd want to use a very strong and hard wood (lignum vitae would be ideal, but there are other species that would work well, too) and would lose the advantages the steel brings, such as added mass and wear resistance (end grain is murderously hard on wooden soles) but would cut construction time down to just a few hours and still have a good tool for occasional use.

OK, if you've made it this far without falling asleep, then congrats, you're well on your way to building one of these:

Rectangle Font Automotive lighting Parallel Motor vehicle


Oh, yeah. I've got a Sketchup file that shows the basic construction. If you are interested in a copy, drop me a PM.

Next installment: Shooting off your mouth
COOOOOOOOOLLLLL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Seeing your previous posts made me want to make one. I had bookmarked this before I even read the first paragraph….
 

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15 Posts
Getting on Target

During the 2015 Plane and Spokeshave Swap, I built a couple of what came to be called Transitional Infill Shooting Planes.



A few people asked for a blog, but there weren't enough pics to really document the build, so it wasn't done. Well, after completing a few other projects, I decided to build one more and will try to do a detailed enough blog that someone else could follow along and build their own shooting plane.

Lets get started.

Gathering materials. First thing is to find a donor transitional plane. These can usually be found very inexpensively where the wood is shot, but the iron parts are salvageable. From this, you will need the frog assembly, frog screws, iron assembly and lever cap.

Wood Ruler Office ruler Rectangle Flooring


For those that don't know, the irons on a transitional are the same as iron bodied planes, but the cap iron has the adjustment hole up higher. If you have a frog, but no iron assembly, you can modify the cap iron from an iron plane by making a second adjustment hole. You'll know the extra hole is there, but it'll be covered by the lever cap when in use.

Any width or brand of iron & frog can work for this build, as long as it uses a screw for the lever cap to provide tension. (There are some out there that have a cross pin and screw cap. That style will not work for this kind of build.) On the first two planes, one had a 2-3/8 Stanley and the other a 2-1/4 Sargent. This build is being done with a 2in wide set from a Union.

Next part needed will be the infill wood. For this build, I'm using a piece of jatoba. The blank needs to start out at least 1-1/2 inches wider than the iron (so 3-1/2 wide for a 2inch iron, 4 inches wide for a 2-3/8 iron) by 1-3/4 thick and a bit longer than the finished piece. This plane will end up about 15 inches long, so I'll start with a rough blank that is at least 18 inches. If you want a fancier look, or just don't have a big enough single piece, feel free to do a laminated blank. Both of the original planes were laminated blanks. The stiffer and heavier the wood, the better off you will be in the end, but any stable hardwood will work.

Next, there are the fasteners. The list for this build is:

Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 steel phillips flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 solid brass slotted flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 2 - #10×1-1/4 slotted round head wood screws (these are for attaching the frog. If you can salvage the screws from the donor transitional, that is probably best, otherwise you'll need to get others)

You'll quickly notice the duplicates in different materials. That is because you want solid brass for the final assembly, but do not want to use the softer metal when doing preliminary work-that is what the steel fasteners are for. Also, make sure to get slotted solid brass, not just brass plated, for the final assembly work. The heads will be ground off and brass plated would look silly. Additionally, the slotted heads are not cut as deep as a phillips. If you try to use brass phillips screws, it's not possible to grind them all the way down to get rid of the dimple.

For the metal, I used precision ground O1 steel. The precision ground costs a bit more than basic flat stock, but is totally worth the extra cost for the time savings and more accurate product. I purchased from Enco, but there are other sellers out there if you prefer to use them.

The base is 3/8 thick by 2 inches wide. The side plate is 1/8 thick and needs to be ~1/2 inch wider than the iron and frog. So for this build, 2-1/2 inches. If using a 2-3/8 set, you'll want 3 inch wide steel. The steel comes in 18in long pieces, so just about the right size. If you are going to build additional planes, buying the 36in long pieces will save quite a bit.

Do yourself a favor and when ordering the metal, order the taps you'll need for the machine screws and a tap extractor, as well. The taps carried by the industrial suppliers are far better quality than those you can find at your local big box or hardware store. The tap extractor will quickly pay for itself when (not if) you break off a tap. Doesn't seem to matter how careful you are, a tap will break at the worst possible time. I like to start with a plug tap and finish off with a bottoming tap.

Note:

If you absolutely do not want to do the metal work, because of fear, lack of tools or time, a perfectly usable all wood shooting plane can be built with the same form and ideas by following the first part of the blog and gluing on a wooden base plate in place of the 3/8 steel. You'd want to use a very strong and hard wood (lignum vitae would be ideal, but there are other species that would work well, too) and would lose the advantages the steel brings, such as added mass and wear resistance (end grain is murderously hard on wooden soles) but would cut construction time down to just a few hours and still have a good tool for occasional use.

OK, if you've made it this far without falling asleep, then congrats, you're well on your way to building one of these:

Rectangle Font Automotive lighting Parallel Motor vehicle


Oh, yeah. I've got a Sketchup file that shows the basic construction. If you are interested in a copy, drop me a PM.

Next installment: Shooting off your mouth
I agree with "WhoMe", I favored it before I read it also.
 

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Registered
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4,962 Posts
Getting on Target

During the 2015 Plane and Spokeshave Swap, I built a couple of what came to be called Transitional Infill Shooting Planes.



A few people asked for a blog, but there weren't enough pics to really document the build, so it wasn't done. Well, after completing a few other projects, I decided to build one more and will try to do a detailed enough blog that someone else could follow along and build their own shooting plane.

Lets get started.

Gathering materials. First thing is to find a donor transitional plane. These can usually be found very inexpensively where the wood is shot, but the iron parts are salvageable. From this, you will need the frog assembly, frog screws, iron assembly and lever cap.

Wood Ruler Office ruler Rectangle Flooring


For those that don't know, the irons on a transitional are the same as iron bodied planes, but the cap iron has the adjustment hole up higher. If you have a frog, but no iron assembly, you can modify the cap iron from an iron plane by making a second adjustment hole. You'll know the extra hole is there, but it'll be covered by the lever cap when in use.

Any width or brand of iron & frog can work for this build, as long as it uses a screw for the lever cap to provide tension. (There are some out there that have a cross pin and screw cap. That style will not work for this kind of build.) On the first two planes, one had a 2-3/8 Stanley and the other a 2-1/4 Sargent. This build is being done with a 2in wide set from a Union.

Next part needed will be the infill wood. For this build, I'm using a piece of jatoba. The blank needs to start out at least 1-1/2 inches wider than the iron (so 3-1/2 wide for a 2inch iron, 4 inches wide for a 2-3/8 iron) by 1-3/4 thick and a bit longer than the finished piece. This plane will end up about 15 inches long, so I'll start with a rough blank that is at least 18 inches. If you want a fancier look, or just don't have a big enough single piece, feel free to do a laminated blank. Both of the original planes were laminated blanks. The stiffer and heavier the wood, the better off you will be in the end, but any stable hardwood will work.

Next, there are the fasteners. The list for this build is:

Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 steel phillips flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 solid brass slotted flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 2 - #10×1-1/4 slotted round head wood screws (these are for attaching the frog. If you can salvage the screws from the donor transitional, that is probably best, otherwise you'll need to get others)

You'll quickly notice the duplicates in different materials. That is because you want solid brass for the final assembly, but do not want to use the softer metal when doing preliminary work-that is what the steel fasteners are for. Also, make sure to get slotted solid brass, not just brass plated, for the final assembly work. The heads will be ground off and brass plated would look silly. Additionally, the slotted heads are not cut as deep as a phillips. If you try to use brass phillips screws, it's not possible to grind them all the way down to get rid of the dimple.

For the metal, I used precision ground O1 steel. The precision ground costs a bit more than basic flat stock, but is totally worth the extra cost for the time savings and more accurate product. I purchased from Enco, but there are other sellers out there if you prefer to use them.

The base is 3/8 thick by 2 inches wide. The side plate is 1/8 thick and needs to be ~1/2 inch wider than the iron and frog. So for this build, 2-1/2 inches. If using a 2-3/8 set, you'll want 3 inch wide steel. The steel comes in 18in long pieces, so just about the right size. If you are going to build additional planes, buying the 36in long pieces will save quite a bit.

Do yourself a favor and when ordering the metal, order the taps you'll need for the machine screws and a tap extractor, as well. The taps carried by the industrial suppliers are far better quality than those you can find at your local big box or hardware store. The tap extractor will quickly pay for itself when (not if) you break off a tap. Doesn't seem to matter how careful you are, a tap will break at the worst possible time. I like to start with a plug tap and finish off with a bottoming tap.

Note:

If you absolutely do not want to do the metal work, because of fear, lack of tools or time, a perfectly usable all wood shooting plane can be built with the same form and ideas by following the first part of the blog and gluing on a wooden base plate in place of the 3/8 steel. You'd want to use a very strong and hard wood (lignum vitae would be ideal, but there are other species that would work well, too) and would lose the advantages the steel brings, such as added mass and wear resistance (end grain is murderously hard on wooden soles) but would cut construction time down to just a few hours and still have a good tool for occasional use.

OK, if you've made it this far without falling asleep, then congrats, you're well on your way to building one of these:

Rectangle Font Automotive lighting Parallel Motor vehicle


Oh, yeah. I've got a Sketchup file that shows the basic construction. If you are interested in a copy, drop me a PM.

Next installment: Shooting off your mouth
So did I! I don't know when I can actually do this, but it's definitely on the bucket list!
Thank you for doing this!

DanK
 

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Registered
Joined
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5,462 Posts
Getting on Target

During the 2015 Plane and Spokeshave Swap, I built a couple of what came to be called Transitional Infill Shooting Planes.



A few people asked for a blog, but there weren't enough pics to really document the build, so it wasn't done. Well, after completing a few other projects, I decided to build one more and will try to do a detailed enough blog that someone else could follow along and build their own shooting plane.

Lets get started.

Gathering materials. First thing is to find a donor transitional plane. These can usually be found very inexpensively where the wood is shot, but the iron parts are salvageable. From this, you will need the frog assembly, frog screws, iron assembly and lever cap.

Wood Ruler Office ruler Rectangle Flooring


For those that don't know, the irons on a transitional are the same as iron bodied planes, but the cap iron has the adjustment hole up higher. If you have a frog, but no iron assembly, you can modify the cap iron from an iron plane by making a second adjustment hole. You'll know the extra hole is there, but it'll be covered by the lever cap when in use.

Any width or brand of iron & frog can work for this build, as long as it uses a screw for the lever cap to provide tension. (There are some out there that have a cross pin and screw cap. That style will not work for this kind of build.) On the first two planes, one had a 2-3/8 Stanley and the other a 2-1/4 Sargent. This build is being done with a 2in wide set from a Union.

Next part needed will be the infill wood. For this build, I'm using a piece of jatoba. The blank needs to start out at least 1-1/2 inches wider than the iron (so 3-1/2 wide for a 2inch iron, 4 inches wide for a 2-3/8 iron) by 1-3/4 thick and a bit longer than the finished piece. This plane will end up about 15 inches long, so I'll start with a rough blank that is at least 18 inches. If you want a fancier look, or just don't have a big enough single piece, feel free to do a laminated blank. Both of the original planes were laminated blanks. The stiffer and heavier the wood, the better off you will be in the end, but any stable hardwood will work.

Next, there are the fasteners. The list for this build is:

Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 steel phillips flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 solid brass slotted flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 2 - #10×1-1/4 slotted round head wood screws (these are for attaching the frog. If you can salvage the screws from the donor transitional, that is probably best, otherwise you'll need to get others)

You'll quickly notice the duplicates in different materials. That is because you want solid brass for the final assembly, but do not want to use the softer metal when doing preliminary work-that is what the steel fasteners are for. Also, make sure to get slotted solid brass, not just brass plated, for the final assembly work. The heads will be ground off and brass plated would look silly. Additionally, the slotted heads are not cut as deep as a phillips. If you try to use brass phillips screws, it's not possible to grind them all the way down to get rid of the dimple.

For the metal, I used precision ground O1 steel. The precision ground costs a bit more than basic flat stock, but is totally worth the extra cost for the time savings and more accurate product. I purchased from Enco, but there are other sellers out there if you prefer to use them.

The base is 3/8 thick by 2 inches wide. The side plate is 1/8 thick and needs to be ~1/2 inch wider than the iron and frog. So for this build, 2-1/2 inches. If using a 2-3/8 set, you'll want 3 inch wide steel. The steel comes in 18in long pieces, so just about the right size. If you are going to build additional planes, buying the 36in long pieces will save quite a bit.

Do yourself a favor and when ordering the metal, order the taps you'll need for the machine screws and a tap extractor, as well. The taps carried by the industrial suppliers are far better quality than those you can find at your local big box or hardware store. The tap extractor will quickly pay for itself when (not if) you break off a tap. Doesn't seem to matter how careful you are, a tap will break at the worst possible time. I like to start with a plug tap and finish off with a bottoming tap.

Note:

If you absolutely do not want to do the metal work, because of fear, lack of tools or time, a perfectly usable all wood shooting plane can be built with the same form and ideas by following the first part of the blog and gluing on a wooden base plate in place of the 3/8 steel. You'd want to use a very strong and hard wood (lignum vitae would be ideal, but there are other species that would work well, too) and would lose the advantages the steel brings, such as added mass and wear resistance (end grain is murderously hard on wooden soles) but would cut construction time down to just a few hours and still have a good tool for occasional use.

OK, if you've made it this far without falling asleep, then congrats, you're well on your way to building one of these:

Rectangle Font Automotive lighting Parallel Motor vehicle


Oh, yeah. I've got a Sketchup file that shows the basic construction. If you are interested in a copy, drop me a PM.

Next installment: Shooting off your mouth
Wow, I am so looking forward to this. Thanks Jay.
I need to get my shop finished so I can actually start making things, like a real bench and this.
 

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Registered
Joined
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5,467 Posts
Getting on Target

During the 2015 Plane and Spokeshave Swap, I built a couple of what came to be called Transitional Infill Shooting Planes.



A few people asked for a blog, but there weren't enough pics to really document the build, so it wasn't done. Well, after completing a few other projects, I decided to build one more and will try to do a detailed enough blog that someone else could follow along and build their own shooting plane.

Lets get started.

Gathering materials. First thing is to find a donor transitional plane. These can usually be found very inexpensively where the wood is shot, but the iron parts are salvageable. From this, you will need the frog assembly, frog screws, iron assembly and lever cap.

Wood Ruler Office ruler Rectangle Flooring


For those that don't know, the irons on a transitional are the same as iron bodied planes, but the cap iron has the adjustment hole up higher. If you have a frog, but no iron assembly, you can modify the cap iron from an iron plane by making a second adjustment hole. You'll know the extra hole is there, but it'll be covered by the lever cap when in use.

Any width or brand of iron & frog can work for this build, as long as it uses a screw for the lever cap to provide tension. (There are some out there that have a cross pin and screw cap. That style will not work for this kind of build.) On the first two planes, one had a 2-3/8 Stanley and the other a 2-1/4 Sargent. This build is being done with a 2in wide set from a Union.

Next part needed will be the infill wood. For this build, I'm using a piece of jatoba. The blank needs to start out at least 1-1/2 inches wider than the iron (so 3-1/2 wide for a 2inch iron, 4 inches wide for a 2-3/8 iron) by 1-3/4 thick and a bit longer than the finished piece. This plane will end up about 15 inches long, so I'll start with a rough blank that is at least 18 inches. If you want a fancier look, or just don't have a big enough single piece, feel free to do a laminated blank. Both of the original planes were laminated blanks. The stiffer and heavier the wood, the better off you will be in the end, but any stable hardwood will work.

Next, there are the fasteners. The list for this build is:

Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 steel phillips flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 solid brass slotted flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 2 - #10×1-1/4 slotted round head wood screws (these are for attaching the frog. If you can salvage the screws from the donor transitional, that is probably best, otherwise you'll need to get others)

You'll quickly notice the duplicates in different materials. That is because you want solid brass for the final assembly, but do not want to use the softer metal when doing preliminary work-that is what the steel fasteners are for. Also, make sure to get slotted solid brass, not just brass plated, for the final assembly work. The heads will be ground off and brass plated would look silly. Additionally, the slotted heads are not cut as deep as a phillips. If you try to use brass phillips screws, it's not possible to grind them all the way down to get rid of the dimple.

For the metal, I used precision ground O1 steel. The precision ground costs a bit more than basic flat stock, but is totally worth the extra cost for the time savings and more accurate product. I purchased from Enco, but there are other sellers out there if you prefer to use them.

The base is 3/8 thick by 2 inches wide. The side plate is 1/8 thick and needs to be ~1/2 inch wider than the iron and frog. So for this build, 2-1/2 inches. If using a 2-3/8 set, you'll want 3 inch wide steel. The steel comes in 18in long pieces, so just about the right size. If you are going to build additional planes, buying the 36in long pieces will save quite a bit.

Do yourself a favor and when ordering the metal, order the taps you'll need for the machine screws and a tap extractor, as well. The taps carried by the industrial suppliers are far better quality than those you can find at your local big box or hardware store. The tap extractor will quickly pay for itself when (not if) you break off a tap. Doesn't seem to matter how careful you are, a tap will break at the worst possible time. I like to start with a plug tap and finish off with a bottoming tap.

Note:

If you absolutely do not want to do the metal work, because of fear, lack of tools or time, a perfectly usable all wood shooting plane can be built with the same form and ideas by following the first part of the blog and gluing on a wooden base plate in place of the 3/8 steel. You'd want to use a very strong and hard wood (lignum vitae would be ideal, but there are other species that would work well, too) and would lose the advantages the steel brings, such as added mass and wear resistance (end grain is murderously hard on wooden soles) but would cut construction time down to just a few hours and still have a good tool for occasional use.

OK, if you've made it this far without falling asleep, then congrats, you're well on your way to building one of these:

Rectangle Font Automotive lighting Parallel Motor vehicle


Oh, yeah. I've got a Sketchup file that shows the basic construction. If you are interested in a copy, drop me a PM.

Next installment: Shooting off your mouth
Thanks JayT.
 

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Getting on Target

During the 2015 Plane and Spokeshave Swap, I built a couple of what came to be called Transitional Infill Shooting Planes.



A few people asked for a blog, but there weren't enough pics to really document the build, so it wasn't done. Well, after completing a few other projects, I decided to build one more and will try to do a detailed enough blog that someone else could follow along and build their own shooting plane.

Lets get started.

Gathering materials. First thing is to find a donor transitional plane. These can usually be found very inexpensively where the wood is shot, but the iron parts are salvageable. From this, you will need the frog assembly, frog screws, iron assembly and lever cap.

Wood Ruler Office ruler Rectangle Flooring


For those that don't know, the irons on a transitional are the same as iron bodied planes, but the cap iron has the adjustment hole up higher. If you have a frog, but no iron assembly, you can modify the cap iron from an iron plane by making a second adjustment hole. You'll know the extra hole is there, but it'll be covered by the lever cap when in use.

Any width or brand of iron & frog can work for this build, as long as it uses a screw for the lever cap to provide tension. (There are some out there that have a cross pin and screw cap. That style will not work for this kind of build.) On the first two planes, one had a 2-3/8 Stanley and the other a 2-1/4 Sargent. This build is being done with a 2in wide set from a Union.

Next part needed will be the infill wood. For this build, I'm using a piece of jatoba. The blank needs to start out at least 1-1/2 inches wider than the iron (so 3-1/2 wide for a 2inch iron, 4 inches wide for a 2-3/8 iron) by 1-3/4 thick and a bit longer than the finished piece. This plane will end up about 15 inches long, so I'll start with a rough blank that is at least 18 inches. If you want a fancier look, or just don't have a big enough single piece, feel free to do a laminated blank. Both of the original planes were laminated blanks. The stiffer and heavier the wood, the better off you will be in the end, but any stable hardwood will work.

Next, there are the fasteners. The list for this build is:

Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 steel phillips flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 solid brass slotted flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 2 - #10×1-1/4 slotted round head wood screws (these are for attaching the frog. If you can salvage the screws from the donor transitional, that is probably best, otherwise you'll need to get others)

You'll quickly notice the duplicates in different materials. That is because you want solid brass for the final assembly, but do not want to use the softer metal when doing preliminary work-that is what the steel fasteners are for. Also, make sure to get slotted solid brass, not just brass plated, for the final assembly work. The heads will be ground off and brass plated would look silly. Additionally, the slotted heads are not cut as deep as a phillips. If you try to use brass phillips screws, it's not possible to grind them all the way down to get rid of the dimple.

For the metal, I used precision ground O1 steel. The precision ground costs a bit more than basic flat stock, but is totally worth the extra cost for the time savings and more accurate product. I purchased from Enco, but there are other sellers out there if you prefer to use them.

The base is 3/8 thick by 2 inches wide. The side plate is 1/8 thick and needs to be ~1/2 inch wider than the iron and frog. So for this build, 2-1/2 inches. If using a 2-3/8 set, you'll want 3 inch wide steel. The steel comes in 18in long pieces, so just about the right size. If you are going to build additional planes, buying the 36in long pieces will save quite a bit.

Do yourself a favor and when ordering the metal, order the taps you'll need for the machine screws and a tap extractor, as well. The taps carried by the industrial suppliers are far better quality than those you can find at your local big box or hardware store. The tap extractor will quickly pay for itself when (not if) you break off a tap. Doesn't seem to matter how careful you are, a tap will break at the worst possible time. I like to start with a plug tap and finish off with a bottoming tap.

Note:

If you absolutely do not want to do the metal work, because of fear, lack of tools or time, a perfectly usable all wood shooting plane can be built with the same form and ideas by following the first part of the blog and gluing on a wooden base plate in place of the 3/8 steel. You'd want to use a very strong and hard wood (lignum vitae would be ideal, but there are other species that would work well, too) and would lose the advantages the steel brings, such as added mass and wear resistance (end grain is murderously hard on wooden soles) but would cut construction time down to just a few hours and still have a good tool for occasional use.

OK, if you've made it this far without falling asleep, then congrats, you're well on your way to building one of these:

Rectangle Font Automotive lighting Parallel Motor vehicle


Oh, yeah. I've got a Sketchup file that shows the basic construction. If you are interested in a copy, drop me a PM.

Next installment: Shooting off your mouth
Much appreciated JayT, thanks
 

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Getting on Target

During the 2015 Plane and Spokeshave Swap, I built a couple of what came to be called Transitional Infill Shooting Planes.



A few people asked for a blog, but there weren't enough pics to really document the build, so it wasn't done. Well, after completing a few other projects, I decided to build one more and will try to do a detailed enough blog that someone else could follow along and build their own shooting plane.

Lets get started.

Gathering materials. First thing is to find a donor transitional plane. These can usually be found very inexpensively where the wood is shot, but the iron parts are salvageable. From this, you will need the frog assembly, frog screws, iron assembly and lever cap.

Wood Ruler Office ruler Rectangle Flooring


For those that don't know, the irons on a transitional are the same as iron bodied planes, but the cap iron has the adjustment hole up higher. If you have a frog, but no iron assembly, you can modify the cap iron from an iron plane by making a second adjustment hole. You'll know the extra hole is there, but it'll be covered by the lever cap when in use.

Any width or brand of iron & frog can work for this build, as long as it uses a screw for the lever cap to provide tension. (There are some out there that have a cross pin and screw cap. That style will not work for this kind of build.) On the first two planes, one had a 2-3/8 Stanley and the other a 2-1/4 Sargent. This build is being done with a 2in wide set from a Union.

Next part needed will be the infill wood. For this build, I'm using a piece of jatoba. The blank needs to start out at least 1-1/2 inches wider than the iron (so 3-1/2 wide for a 2inch iron, 4 inches wide for a 2-3/8 iron) by 1-3/4 thick and a bit longer than the finished piece. This plane will end up about 15 inches long, so I'll start with a rough blank that is at least 18 inches. If you want a fancier look, or just don't have a big enough single piece, feel free to do a laminated blank. Both of the original planes were laminated blanks. The stiffer and heavier the wood, the better off you will be in the end, but any stable hardwood will work.

Next, there are the fasteners. The list for this build is:

Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 steel phillips flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 solid brass slotted flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 2 - #10×1-1/4 slotted round head wood screws (these are for attaching the frog. If you can salvage the screws from the donor transitional, that is probably best, otherwise you'll need to get others)

You'll quickly notice the duplicates in different materials. That is because you want solid brass for the final assembly, but do not want to use the softer metal when doing preliminary work-that is what the steel fasteners are for. Also, make sure to get slotted solid brass, not just brass plated, for the final assembly work. The heads will be ground off and brass plated would look silly. Additionally, the slotted heads are not cut as deep as a phillips. If you try to use brass phillips screws, it's not possible to grind them all the way down to get rid of the dimple.

For the metal, I used precision ground O1 steel. The precision ground costs a bit more than basic flat stock, but is totally worth the extra cost for the time savings and more accurate product. I purchased from Enco, but there are other sellers out there if you prefer to use them.

The base is 3/8 thick by 2 inches wide. The side plate is 1/8 thick and needs to be ~1/2 inch wider than the iron and frog. So for this build, 2-1/2 inches. If using a 2-3/8 set, you'll want 3 inch wide steel. The steel comes in 18in long pieces, so just about the right size. If you are going to build additional planes, buying the 36in long pieces will save quite a bit.

Do yourself a favor and when ordering the metal, order the taps you'll need for the machine screws and a tap extractor, as well. The taps carried by the industrial suppliers are far better quality than those you can find at your local big box or hardware store. The tap extractor will quickly pay for itself when (not if) you break off a tap. Doesn't seem to matter how careful you are, a tap will break at the worst possible time. I like to start with a plug tap and finish off with a bottoming tap.

Note:

If you absolutely do not want to do the metal work, because of fear, lack of tools or time, a perfectly usable all wood shooting plane can be built with the same form and ideas by following the first part of the blog and gluing on a wooden base plate in place of the 3/8 steel. You'd want to use a very strong and hard wood (lignum vitae would be ideal, but there are other species that would work well, too) and would lose the advantages the steel brings, such as added mass and wear resistance (end grain is murderously hard on wooden soles) but would cut construction time down to just a few hours and still have a good tool for occasional use.

OK, if you've made it this far without falling asleep, then congrats, you're well on your way to building one of these:

Rectangle Font Automotive lighting Parallel Motor vehicle


Oh, yeah. I've got a Sketchup file that shows the basic construction. If you are interested in a copy, drop me a PM.

Next installment: Shooting off your mouth
Just getting to this. I'm pumped. Do you have a customer we that is prompting this build?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Getting on Target

During the 2015 Plane and Spokeshave Swap, I built a couple of what came to be called Transitional Infill Shooting Planes.



A few people asked for a blog, but there weren't enough pics to really document the build, so it wasn't done. Well, after completing a few other projects, I decided to build one more and will try to do a detailed enough blog that someone else could follow along and build their own shooting plane.

Lets get started.

Gathering materials. First thing is to find a donor transitional plane. These can usually be found very inexpensively where the wood is shot, but the iron parts are salvageable. From this, you will need the frog assembly, frog screws, iron assembly and lever cap.

Wood Ruler Office ruler Rectangle Flooring


For those that don't know, the irons on a transitional are the same as iron bodied planes, but the cap iron has the adjustment hole up higher. If you have a frog, but no iron assembly, you can modify the cap iron from an iron plane by making a second adjustment hole. You'll know the extra hole is there, but it'll be covered by the lever cap when in use.

Any width or brand of iron & frog can work for this build, as long as it uses a screw for the lever cap to provide tension. (There are some out there that have a cross pin and screw cap. That style will not work for this kind of build.) On the first two planes, one had a 2-3/8 Stanley and the other a 2-1/4 Sargent. This build is being done with a 2in wide set from a Union.

Next part needed will be the infill wood. For this build, I'm using a piece of jatoba. The blank needs to start out at least 1-1/2 inches wider than the iron (so 3-1/2 wide for a 2inch iron, 4 inches wide for a 2-3/8 iron) by 1-3/4 thick and a bit longer than the finished piece. This plane will end up about 15 inches long, so I'll start with a rough blank that is at least 18 inches. If you want a fancier look, or just don't have a big enough single piece, feel free to do a laminated blank. Both of the original planes were laminated blanks. The stiffer and heavier the wood, the better off you will be in the end, but any stable hardwood will work.

Next, there are the fasteners. The list for this build is:

Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 steel phillips flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 solid brass slotted flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 2 - #10×1-1/4 slotted round head wood screws (these are for attaching the frog. If you can salvage the screws from the donor transitional, that is probably best, otherwise you'll need to get others)

You'll quickly notice the duplicates in different materials. That is because you want solid brass for the final assembly, but do not want to use the softer metal when doing preliminary work-that is what the steel fasteners are for. Also, make sure to get slotted solid brass, not just brass plated, for the final assembly work. The heads will be ground off and brass plated would look silly. Additionally, the slotted heads are not cut as deep as a phillips. If you try to use brass phillips screws, it's not possible to grind them all the way down to get rid of the dimple.

For the metal, I used precision ground O1 steel. The precision ground costs a bit more than basic flat stock, but is totally worth the extra cost for the time savings and more accurate product. I purchased from Enco, but there are other sellers out there if you prefer to use them.

The base is 3/8 thick by 2 inches wide. The side plate is 1/8 thick and needs to be ~1/2 inch wider than the iron and frog. So for this build, 2-1/2 inches. If using a 2-3/8 set, you'll want 3 inch wide steel. The steel comes in 18in long pieces, so just about the right size. If you are going to build additional planes, buying the 36in long pieces will save quite a bit.

Do yourself a favor and when ordering the metal, order the taps you'll need for the machine screws and a tap extractor, as well. The taps carried by the industrial suppliers are far better quality than those you can find at your local big box or hardware store. The tap extractor will quickly pay for itself when (not if) you break off a tap. Doesn't seem to matter how careful you are, a tap will break at the worst possible time. I like to start with a plug tap and finish off with a bottoming tap.

Note:

If you absolutely do not want to do the metal work, because of fear, lack of tools or time, a perfectly usable all wood shooting plane can be built with the same form and ideas by following the first part of the blog and gluing on a wooden base plate in place of the 3/8 steel. You'd want to use a very strong and hard wood (lignum vitae would be ideal, but there are other species that would work well, too) and would lose the advantages the steel brings, such as added mass and wear resistance (end grain is murderously hard on wooden soles) but would cut construction time down to just a few hours and still have a good tool for occasional use.

OK, if you've made it this far without falling asleep, then congrats, you're well on your way to building one of these:

Rectangle Font Automotive lighting Parallel Motor vehicle


Oh, yeah. I've got a Sketchup file that shows the basic construction. If you are interested in a copy, drop me a PM.

Next installment: Shooting off your mouth
No, Todd, no customer. I'm obviously not a good entrepreneur, giving out my build secrets to anyone with a computer instead of charging them to build a plane. :) Maybe I should figure out a way to charge to read the blog, like some of the woodworking magazines do.

This one will most likely get gifted. I was going to order steel anyways to do an infill smoother, so just decided to order longer pieces and blog a shooter build, since enough people asked.
 

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Getting on Target

During the 2015 Plane and Spokeshave Swap, I built a couple of what came to be called Transitional Infill Shooting Planes.



A few people asked for a blog, but there weren't enough pics to really document the build, so it wasn't done. Well, after completing a few other projects, I decided to build one more and will try to do a detailed enough blog that someone else could follow along and build their own shooting plane.

Lets get started.

Gathering materials. First thing is to find a donor transitional plane. These can usually be found very inexpensively where the wood is shot, but the iron parts are salvageable. From this, you will need the frog assembly, frog screws, iron assembly and lever cap.

Wood Ruler Office ruler Rectangle Flooring


For those that don't know, the irons on a transitional are the same as iron bodied planes, but the cap iron has the adjustment hole up higher. If you have a frog, but no iron assembly, you can modify the cap iron from an iron plane by making a second adjustment hole. You'll know the extra hole is there, but it'll be covered by the lever cap when in use.

Any width or brand of iron & frog can work for this build, as long as it uses a screw for the lever cap to provide tension. (There are some out there that have a cross pin and screw cap. That style will not work for this kind of build.) On the first two planes, one had a 2-3/8 Stanley and the other a 2-1/4 Sargent. This build is being done with a 2in wide set from a Union.

Next part needed will be the infill wood. For this build, I'm using a piece of jatoba. The blank needs to start out at least 1-1/2 inches wider than the iron (so 3-1/2 wide for a 2inch iron, 4 inches wide for a 2-3/8 iron) by 1-3/4 thick and a bit longer than the finished piece. This plane will end up about 15 inches long, so I'll start with a rough blank that is at least 18 inches. If you want a fancier look, or just don't have a big enough single piece, feel free to do a laminated blank. Both of the original planes were laminated blanks. The stiffer and heavier the wood, the better off you will be in the end, but any stable hardwood will work.

Next, there are the fasteners. The list for this build is:

Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 steel phillips flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 solid brass slotted flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 2 - #10×1-1/4 slotted round head wood screws (these are for attaching the frog. If you can salvage the screws from the donor transitional, that is probably best, otherwise you'll need to get others)

You'll quickly notice the duplicates in different materials. That is because you want solid brass for the final assembly, but do not want to use the softer metal when doing preliminary work-that is what the steel fasteners are for. Also, make sure to get slotted solid brass, not just brass plated, for the final assembly work. The heads will be ground off and brass plated would look silly. Additionally, the slotted heads are not cut as deep as a phillips. If you try to use brass phillips screws, it's not possible to grind them all the way down to get rid of the dimple.

For the metal, I used precision ground O1 steel. The precision ground costs a bit more than basic flat stock, but is totally worth the extra cost for the time savings and more accurate product. I purchased from Enco, but there are other sellers out there if you prefer to use them.

The base is 3/8 thick by 2 inches wide. The side plate is 1/8 thick and needs to be ~1/2 inch wider than the iron and frog. So for this build, 2-1/2 inches. If using a 2-3/8 set, you'll want 3 inch wide steel. The steel comes in 18in long pieces, so just about the right size. If you are going to build additional planes, buying the 36in long pieces will save quite a bit.

Do yourself a favor and when ordering the metal, order the taps you'll need for the machine screws and a tap extractor, as well. The taps carried by the industrial suppliers are far better quality than those you can find at your local big box or hardware store. The tap extractor will quickly pay for itself when (not if) you break off a tap. Doesn't seem to matter how careful you are, a tap will break at the worst possible time. I like to start with a plug tap and finish off with a bottoming tap.

Note:

If you absolutely do not want to do the metal work, because of fear, lack of tools or time, a perfectly usable all wood shooting plane can be built with the same form and ideas by following the first part of the blog and gluing on a wooden base plate in place of the 3/8 steel. You'd want to use a very strong and hard wood (lignum vitae would be ideal, but there are other species that would work well, too) and would lose the advantages the steel brings, such as added mass and wear resistance (end grain is murderously hard on wooden soles) but would cut construction time down to just a few hours and still have a good tool for occasional use.

OK, if you've made it this far without falling asleep, then congrats, you're well on your way to building one of these:

Rectangle Font Automotive lighting Parallel Motor vehicle


Oh, yeah. I've got a Sketchup file that shows the basic construction. If you are interested in a copy, drop me a PM.

Next installment: Shooting off your mouth
Really nice job on the instructions Jay T. I appreciate the time it took you to document all this. I've looked at a lot of DIY shooting plane instructions and decided to try to build your version in my spare time as a weekend woodworker. Your version seems most doable and elegant with the tools I have available. So I gathered all the wood, screws, taps, etc and am starting to dive-in and build. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Getting on Target

During the 2015 Plane and Spokeshave Swap, I built a couple of what came to be called Transitional Infill Shooting Planes.



A few people asked for a blog, but there weren't enough pics to really document the build, so it wasn't done. Well, after completing a few other projects, I decided to build one more and will try to do a detailed enough blog that someone else could follow along and build their own shooting plane.

Lets get started.

Gathering materials. First thing is to find a donor transitional plane. These can usually be found very inexpensively where the wood is shot, but the iron parts are salvageable. From this, you will need the frog assembly, frog screws, iron assembly and lever cap.

Wood Ruler Office ruler Rectangle Flooring


For those that don't know, the irons on a transitional are the same as iron bodied planes, but the cap iron has the adjustment hole up higher. If you have a frog, but no iron assembly, you can modify the cap iron from an iron plane by making a second adjustment hole. You'll know the extra hole is there, but it'll be covered by the lever cap when in use.

Any width or brand of iron & frog can work for this build, as long as it uses a screw for the lever cap to provide tension. (There are some out there that have a cross pin and screw cap. That style will not work for this kind of build.) On the first two planes, one had a 2-3/8 Stanley and the other a 2-1/4 Sargent. This build is being done with a 2in wide set from a Union.

Next part needed will be the infill wood. For this build, I'm using a piece of jatoba. The blank needs to start out at least 1-1/2 inches wider than the iron (so 3-1/2 wide for a 2inch iron, 4 inches wide for a 2-3/8 iron) by 1-3/4 thick and a bit longer than the finished piece. This plane will end up about 15 inches long, so I'll start with a rough blank that is at least 18 inches. If you want a fancier look, or just don't have a big enough single piece, feel free to do a laminated blank. Both of the original planes were laminated blanks. The stiffer and heavier the wood, the better off you will be in the end, but any stable hardwood will work.

Next, there are the fasteners. The list for this build is:

Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 steel phillips flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 solid brass slotted flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 2 - #10×1-1/4 slotted round head wood screws (these are for attaching the frog. If you can salvage the screws from the donor transitional, that is probably best, otherwise you'll need to get others)

You'll quickly notice the duplicates in different materials. That is because you want solid brass for the final assembly, but do not want to use the softer metal when doing preliminary work-that is what the steel fasteners are for. Also, make sure to get slotted solid brass, not just brass plated, for the final assembly work. The heads will be ground off and brass plated would look silly. Additionally, the slotted heads are not cut as deep as a phillips. If you try to use brass phillips screws, it's not possible to grind them all the way down to get rid of the dimple.

For the metal, I used precision ground O1 steel. The precision ground costs a bit more than basic flat stock, but is totally worth the extra cost for the time savings and more accurate product. I purchased from Enco, but there are other sellers out there if you prefer to use them.

The base is 3/8 thick by 2 inches wide. The side plate is 1/8 thick and needs to be ~1/2 inch wider than the iron and frog. So for this build, 2-1/2 inches. If using a 2-3/8 set, you'll want 3 inch wide steel. The steel comes in 18in long pieces, so just about the right size. If you are going to build additional planes, buying the 36in long pieces will save quite a bit.

Do yourself a favor and when ordering the metal, order the taps you'll need for the machine screws and a tap extractor, as well. The taps carried by the industrial suppliers are far better quality than those you can find at your local big box or hardware store. The tap extractor will quickly pay for itself when (not if) you break off a tap. Doesn't seem to matter how careful you are, a tap will break at the worst possible time. I like to start with a plug tap and finish off with a bottoming tap.

Note:

If you absolutely do not want to do the metal work, because of fear, lack of tools or time, a perfectly usable all wood shooting plane can be built with the same form and ideas by following the first part of the blog and gluing on a wooden base plate in place of the 3/8 steel. You'd want to use a very strong and hard wood (lignum vitae would be ideal, but there are other species that would work well, too) and would lose the advantages the steel brings, such as added mass and wear resistance (end grain is murderously hard on wooden soles) but would cut construction time down to just a few hours and still have a good tool for occasional use.

OK, if you've made it this far without falling asleep, then congrats, you're well on your way to building one of these:

Rectangle Font Automotive lighting Parallel Motor vehicle


Oh, yeah. I've got a Sketchup file that shows the basic construction. If you are interested in a copy, drop me a PM.

Next installment: Shooting off your mouth
Good luck on the build, Mark, please post pics when you finish. I'd love to see others' interpretations of the design.
 

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Getting on Target

During the 2015 Plane and Spokeshave Swap, I built a couple of what came to be called Transitional Infill Shooting Planes.



A few people asked for a blog, but there weren't enough pics to really document the build, so it wasn't done. Well, after completing a few other projects, I decided to build one more and will try to do a detailed enough blog that someone else could follow along and build their own shooting plane.

Lets get started.

Gathering materials. First thing is to find a donor transitional plane. These can usually be found very inexpensively where the wood is shot, but the iron parts are salvageable. From this, you will need the frog assembly, frog screws, iron assembly and lever cap.

Wood Ruler Office ruler Rectangle Flooring


For those that don't know, the irons on a transitional are the same as iron bodied planes, but the cap iron has the adjustment hole up higher. If you have a frog, but no iron assembly, you can modify the cap iron from an iron plane by making a second adjustment hole. You'll know the extra hole is there, but it'll be covered by the lever cap when in use.

Any width or brand of iron & frog can work for this build, as long as it uses a screw for the lever cap to provide tension. (There are some out there that have a cross pin and screw cap. That style will not work for this kind of build.) On the first two planes, one had a 2-3/8 Stanley and the other a 2-1/4 Sargent. This build is being done with a 2in wide set from a Union.

Next part needed will be the infill wood. For this build, I'm using a piece of jatoba. The blank needs to start out at least 1-1/2 inches wider than the iron (so 3-1/2 wide for a 2inch iron, 4 inches wide for a 2-3/8 iron) by 1-3/4 thick and a bit longer than the finished piece. This plane will end up about 15 inches long, so I'll start with a rough blank that is at least 18 inches. If you want a fancier look, or just don't have a big enough single piece, feel free to do a laminated blank. Both of the original planes were laminated blanks. The stiffer and heavier the wood, the better off you will be in the end, but any stable hardwood will work.

Next, there are the fasteners. The list for this build is:

Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 steel phillips flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - 10-24×1/2 solid brass slotted flat head machine screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 5 - #10×1-1/2 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 steel phillips flat head wood screws
Qty 10 - #8×1 solid brass slotted flat head wood screws
Qty 2 - #10×1-1/4 slotted round head wood screws (these are for attaching the frog. If you can salvage the screws from the donor transitional, that is probably best, otherwise you'll need to get others)

You'll quickly notice the duplicates in different materials. That is because you want solid brass for the final assembly, but do not want to use the softer metal when doing preliminary work-that is what the steel fasteners are for. Also, make sure to get slotted solid brass, not just brass plated, for the final assembly work. The heads will be ground off and brass plated would look silly. Additionally, the slotted heads are not cut as deep as a phillips. If you try to use brass phillips screws, it's not possible to grind them all the way down to get rid of the dimple.

For the metal, I used precision ground O1 steel. The precision ground costs a bit more than basic flat stock, but is totally worth the extra cost for the time savings and more accurate product. I purchased from Enco, but there are other sellers out there if you prefer to use them.

The base is 3/8 thick by 2 inches wide. The side plate is 1/8 thick and needs to be ~1/2 inch wider than the iron and frog. So for this build, 2-1/2 inches. If using a 2-3/8 set, you'll want 3 inch wide steel. The steel comes in 18in long pieces, so just about the right size. If you are going to build additional planes, buying the 36in long pieces will save quite a bit.

Do yourself a favor and when ordering the metal, order the taps you'll need for the machine screws and a tap extractor, as well. The taps carried by the industrial suppliers are far better quality than those you can find at your local big box or hardware store. The tap extractor will quickly pay for itself when (not if) you break off a tap. Doesn't seem to matter how careful you are, a tap will break at the worst possible time. I like to start with a plug tap and finish off with a bottoming tap.

Note:

If you absolutely do not want to do the metal work, because of fear, lack of tools or time, a perfectly usable all wood shooting plane can be built with the same form and ideas by following the first part of the blog and gluing on a wooden base plate in place of the 3/8 steel. You'd want to use a very strong and hard wood (lignum vitae would be ideal, but there are other species that would work well, too) and would lose the advantages the steel brings, such as added mass and wear resistance (end grain is murderously hard on wooden soles) but would cut construction time down to just a few hours and still have a good tool for occasional use.

OK, if you've made it this far without falling asleep, then congrats, you're well on your way to building one of these:

Rectangle Font Automotive lighting Parallel Motor vehicle


Oh, yeah. I've got a Sketchup file that shows the basic construction. If you are interested in a copy, drop me a PM.

Next installment: Shooting off your mouth
Here's a link to part 2 for the lazy! Shooting off your mouth
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Prepare to open your mouth

With materials in hand, it's time to start the actual work.

First step is to create the mouth, bedding surface for the iron and front escapement area for the shavings. For infill bench planes, the wood can be cut completely apart and held on with the two metal sides during final assembly. Since this shooting plane only has one metal side, that strategy is not a good possibility.

With many wooden plane builds, making this opening requires either chiseling out the area or doing a Krenov style plane by cutting off the sides and gluing them back on. For this build, I came up with a way to more easily create the void by utilizing the characteristics of a shooting plane.

Looking at the exploded Sketchup file, you can see that the channel can be cut from one side of the wood blank. The metal piece that is the base will end up supporting the wood. Kind of a hybrid approach of infill on one side and the wood body chiseled out on the other, but able to be done much easier than either.

Rectangle Font Tints and shades Automotive design Wood


Layout is pretty straight forward. Before doing any layout, make sure that you have a perfectly square corner on the wood blank where the two metal pieces will meet. This will be essential in having a good performing shooting plane. Note: I did the layout and took pics of the process on the jatoba, but the layout lines didn't show up very well in pics because of the color of the wood. In order to better show the process, I retook the pics, using a short piece of scrap 2×4.

Bedding angle of a transitional plane is 45 degrees, so that will give us the first angle. Flip your wood blank so the narrow, bottom side is facing up. The mouth on the plane needs to be about 1/3 of the way from the front of the body. So for our 15 inch long plane, measure back a little over 5 inches and make a mark on the side that will be the mouth. (Your wood blank is still a bit over long, right? Even a 1/2 inch or so is enough) Make another mark about 1/8 in front of that one and then mark out 45 degrees each way. Front of the plane is to the right in this pic.

Note: All layout is being described and shown for a right handed user. For you lefties out there, just mirror image everything.

Table Rectangle Wood Floor Flooring


Turn the wood blank so that you are looking at what will be the wide side of the mouth opening. For best performance, you want a skewed cut. A couple reasons for this. First is that skewing the cut reduces the effective cutting angle by a few degrees, which helps cut through end grain. The second, and IMHO more important reason, is that having a skewed cut forces the workpiece down and into the fence of the shooting board, which helps hold it in place when shooting.

The skew angle is not critical, but I use 20 degrees as a guideline. It's a simple matter to mark out the angle using a protractor or speed square, with the line going from the mouth opening and angling toward the front of the plane.

Rectangle Wood Water Font Tints and shades


A sliding bevel can now be set and used to transfer the marks.

Ruler Wood Office ruler Wood stain Tool


Flipping the blank over to the mouth side, we can use the bevel to mark the mouth, as well.

Hand tool Wood Saw Office ruler Tool


Double check to make sure that the angles on both sides are going the same direction.

Final piece of layout is to mark how deep the cut needs to be. Take the iron, line up the cutting edge with the mouth opening lines and mark the depth. You'll want to add about 1/8 inch to allow the iron to make lateral adjustments in use.

Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Cutting board


A marking gauge can be used to transfer this dimension to the top of the blank.

Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Plank


That's the basic layout. It took far longer to type out than to do. Next up: Opening the mouth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Open up and say aaah

With layout all marked up, it's time to cut the opening. I did this with a sliding compound miter saw and the plane was designed to make that the best tool to use. If you don't have a SCMS or are just more comfortable with a table saw and miter gauge or handsaws, no reason not to use them.

For a miter saw, set the bevel to 20 degrees and the miter to 45 degrees. Hopefully you have a depth stop. If so, mark the proper distance up from the table on a piece of scrap and do some test cuts until it's just kissing the line. Again, make sure your mark matches the distance from the table on your wood blank, not the depth of cut, unless your scrap is the exact same width as your blank.

Wood Natural material Plank Wood stain Rectangle


Once the depth is set, you can make the first cut on the wood body blank.

Wood Automotive tire Hardwood Bumper Wood stain


The cut will most likely not exactly match the skew angle that is marked out, though it should match the 45 degree bed angle. That's OK. Unless you are an engineer and want to do the math, the compound miter causes the angles to skew off a bit. The reason for marking up the blank is to ensure you are cutting everything the right direction.

Now, leaving the bevel angle alone, switch the saw to the opposite 45 degree miter angle and make the second cut. The goal is to have the blade track through the exact same opening where the mouth is going to be.

Wood Table Automotive tire Floor Flooring


Depending on your saw, it may or may not cut clear to the line on the back side. Mine does not, but it's a simple matter to either put in a spacer on the miter saw or finish out the cut with a handsaw, as I did. You can see the difference in the kerf width.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Plank Rectangle


To remove the waste, a couple light blows with mallet and chisel will pop most of it out. The back surface will be rough. That is not a problem, we are going to have to pare it out anyways.

Table Wood Flooring Hardwood Wood stain


Using the frog and iron, measure or mark out about how far back you will need to pare to get everything to fit.

Brown Wood Hardwood Gas Wood stain


Then a hand saw can be used to extend the angles down to that line. Do not cut the mouth itself any deeper, the cut should angle from the mouth opening to the top face.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Plank


With a sharp chisel, pare back the body to your mark. The paring cuts will taper from being wider at the top to just hitting the edge of the saw kerf at the bottom. You'll end up needing to match the skew with this face of the opening. A wider chisel is best, as it allows better registration against the bed that the saw made. Since you may need to be cutting some end grain, make sure the chisel is SHARP.

Wood Tool Gas Hardwood Metalworking hand tool


As you get close, use the iron to check width. A small square can be used to mark a line on the bed perpendicular to the skew angle that will make it a lot easier to see when you are getting close. Once the body is pared back enough to where you can lay the iron in and have about 1/8 inch between the iron and that line, you are good. Do any final paring you want to clean up the surfaces.

Wood Rectangle Material property Hardwood Wood stain


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Plank Brick


Next installment: Feeling froggy
 

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Open up and say aaah

With layout all marked up, it's time to cut the opening. I did this with a sliding compound miter saw and the plane was designed to make that the best tool to use. If you don't have a SCMS or are just more comfortable with a table saw and miter gauge or handsaws, no reason not to use them.

For a miter saw, set the bevel to 20 degrees and the miter to 45 degrees. Hopefully you have a depth stop. If so, mark the proper distance up from the table on a piece of scrap and do some test cuts until it's just kissing the line. Again, make sure your mark matches the distance from the table on your wood blank, not the depth of cut, unless your scrap is the exact same width as your blank.

Wood Natural material Plank Wood stain Rectangle


Once the depth is set, you can make the first cut on the wood body blank.

Wood Automotive tire Hardwood Bumper Wood stain


The cut will most likely not exactly match the skew angle that is marked out, though it should match the 45 degree bed angle. That's OK. Unless you are an engineer and want to do the math, the compound miter causes the angles to skew off a bit. The reason for marking up the blank is to ensure you are cutting everything the right direction.

Now, leaving the bevel angle alone, switch the saw to the opposite 45 degree miter angle and make the second cut. The goal is to have the blade track through the exact same opening where the mouth is going to be.

Wood Table Automotive tire Floor Flooring


Depending on your saw, it may or may not cut clear to the line on the back side. Mine does not, but it's a simple matter to either put in a spacer on the miter saw or finish out the cut with a handsaw, as I did. You can see the difference in the kerf width.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Plank Rectangle


To remove the waste, a couple light blows with mallet and chisel will pop most of it out. The back surface will be rough. That is not a problem, we are going to have to pare it out anyways.

Table Wood Flooring Hardwood Wood stain


Using the frog and iron, measure or mark out about how far back you will need to pare to get everything to fit.

Brown Wood Hardwood Gas Wood stain


Then a hand saw can be used to extend the angles down to that line. Do not cut the mouth itself any deeper, the cut should angle from the mouth opening to the top face.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Plank


With a sharp chisel, pare back the body to your mark. The paring cuts will taper from being wider at the top to just hitting the edge of the saw kerf at the bottom. You'll end up needing to match the skew with this face of the opening. A wider chisel is best, as it allows better registration against the bed that the saw made. Since you may need to be cutting some end grain, make sure the chisel is SHARP.

Wood Tool Gas Hardwood Metalworking hand tool


As you get close, use the iron to check width. A small square can be used to mark a line on the bed perpendicular to the skew angle that will make it a lot easier to see when you are getting close. Once the body is pared back enough to where you can lay the iron in and have about 1/8 inch between the iron and that line, you are good. Do any final paring you want to clean up the surfaces.

Wood Rectangle Material property Hardwood Wood stain


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Plank Brick


Next installment: Feeling froggy
Thanks JT, pretty awesome of you to share this knowledge. Passing on these traditions of using tools like a shooter is going to stay alive because of people like you. I glued up my lamination this evening. Still need to grab screws but I am following along and will work on this more this weekend mostly but will try to find time this week.

I have a band saw, miter saw (not compounding), some old disstons hanging around sharp and ready, and a ryobi. I think I will start the cuts on my miter saw and finish with a disstons or ryobi. I don't think I trust my accuracy to do the whole cut at those angles by hand. I might cut a 2×4 straight through on the miter saw to use as a saw guide and do it by hand with the crutch. Not sure yet but I'll be a little nervous either way. Thanks again for the write up.

Looking forward to the rest.
 

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Open up and say aaah

With layout all marked up, it's time to cut the opening. I did this with a sliding compound miter saw and the plane was designed to make that the best tool to use. If you don't have a SCMS or are just more comfortable with a table saw and miter gauge or handsaws, no reason not to use them.

For a miter saw, set the bevel to 20 degrees and the miter to 45 degrees. Hopefully you have a depth stop. If so, mark the proper distance up from the table on a piece of scrap and do some test cuts until it's just kissing the line. Again, make sure your mark matches the distance from the table on your wood blank, not the depth of cut, unless your scrap is the exact same width as your blank.

Wood Natural material Plank Wood stain Rectangle


Once the depth is set, you can make the first cut on the wood body blank.

Wood Automotive tire Hardwood Bumper Wood stain


The cut will most likely not exactly match the skew angle that is marked out, though it should match the 45 degree bed angle. That's OK. Unless you are an engineer and want to do the math, the compound miter causes the angles to skew off a bit. The reason for marking up the blank is to ensure you are cutting everything the right direction.

Now, leaving the bevel angle alone, switch the saw to the opposite 45 degree miter angle and make the second cut. The goal is to have the blade track through the exact same opening where the mouth is going to be.

Wood Table Automotive tire Floor Flooring


Depending on your saw, it may or may not cut clear to the line on the back side. Mine does not, but it's a simple matter to either put in a spacer on the miter saw or finish out the cut with a handsaw, as I did. You can see the difference in the kerf width.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Plank Rectangle


To remove the waste, a couple light blows with mallet and chisel will pop most of it out. The back surface will be rough. That is not a problem, we are going to have to pare it out anyways.

Table Wood Flooring Hardwood Wood stain


Using the frog and iron, measure or mark out about how far back you will need to pare to get everything to fit.

Brown Wood Hardwood Gas Wood stain


Then a hand saw can be used to extend the angles down to that line. Do not cut the mouth itself any deeper, the cut should angle from the mouth opening to the top face.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Plank


With a sharp chisel, pare back the body to your mark. The paring cuts will taper from being wider at the top to just hitting the edge of the saw kerf at the bottom. You'll end up needing to match the skew with this face of the opening. A wider chisel is best, as it allows better registration against the bed that the saw made. Since you may need to be cutting some end grain, make sure the chisel is SHARP.

Wood Tool Gas Hardwood Metalworking hand tool


As you get close, use the iron to check width. A small square can be used to mark a line on the bed perpendicular to the skew angle that will make it a lot easier to see when you are getting close. Once the body is pared back enough to where you can lay the iron in and have about 1/8 inch between the iron and that line, you are good. Do any final paring you want to clean up the surfaces.

Wood Rectangle Material property Hardwood Wood stain


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Plank Brick


Next installment: Feeling froggy
I meant Ryoba saw…spell check I suppose hit me on that one. Not sure why I noticed this morning.
 

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Open up and say aaah

With layout all marked up, it's time to cut the opening. I did this with a sliding compound miter saw and the plane was designed to make that the best tool to use. If you don't have a SCMS or are just more comfortable with a table saw and miter gauge or handsaws, no reason not to use them.

For a miter saw, set the bevel to 20 degrees and the miter to 45 degrees. Hopefully you have a depth stop. If so, mark the proper distance up from the table on a piece of scrap and do some test cuts until it's just kissing the line. Again, make sure your mark matches the distance from the table on your wood blank, not the depth of cut, unless your scrap is the exact same width as your blank.

Wood Natural material Plank Wood stain Rectangle


Once the depth is set, you can make the first cut on the wood body blank.

Wood Automotive tire Hardwood Bumper Wood stain


The cut will most likely not exactly match the skew angle that is marked out, though it should match the 45 degree bed angle. That's OK. Unless you are an engineer and want to do the math, the compound miter causes the angles to skew off a bit. The reason for marking up the blank is to ensure you are cutting everything the right direction.

Now, leaving the bevel angle alone, switch the saw to the opposite 45 degree miter angle and make the second cut. The goal is to have the blade track through the exact same opening where the mouth is going to be.

Wood Table Automotive tire Floor Flooring


Depending on your saw, it may or may not cut clear to the line on the back side. Mine does not, but it's a simple matter to either put in a spacer on the miter saw or finish out the cut with a handsaw, as I did. You can see the difference in the kerf width.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Plank Rectangle


To remove the waste, a couple light blows with mallet and chisel will pop most of it out. The back surface will be rough. That is not a problem, we are going to have to pare it out anyways.

Table Wood Flooring Hardwood Wood stain


Using the frog and iron, measure or mark out about how far back you will need to pare to get everything to fit.

Brown Wood Hardwood Gas Wood stain


Then a hand saw can be used to extend the angles down to that line. Do not cut the mouth itself any deeper, the cut should angle from the mouth opening to the top face.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Plank


With a sharp chisel, pare back the body to your mark. The paring cuts will taper from being wider at the top to just hitting the edge of the saw kerf at the bottom. You'll end up needing to match the skew with this face of the opening. A wider chisel is best, as it allows better registration against the bed that the saw made. Since you may need to be cutting some end grain, make sure the chisel is SHARP.

Wood Tool Gas Hardwood Metalworking hand tool


As you get close, use the iron to check width. A small square can be used to mark a line on the bed perpendicular to the skew angle that will make it a lot easier to see when you are getting close. Once the body is pared back enough to where you can lay the iron in and have about 1/8 inch between the iron and that line, you are good. Do any final paring you want to clean up the surfaces.

Wood Rectangle Material property Hardwood Wood stain


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Plank Brick


Next installment: Feeling froggy
Amazing work there, Jay.
Thanks for sharing this!
 

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3,176 Posts
Open up and say aaah

With layout all marked up, it's time to cut the opening. I did this with a sliding compound miter saw and the plane was designed to make that the best tool to use. If you don't have a SCMS or are just more comfortable with a table saw and miter gauge or handsaws, no reason not to use them.

For a miter saw, set the bevel to 20 degrees and the miter to 45 degrees. Hopefully you have a depth stop. If so, mark the proper distance up from the table on a piece of scrap and do some test cuts until it's just kissing the line. Again, make sure your mark matches the distance from the table on your wood blank, not the depth of cut, unless your scrap is the exact same width as your blank.

Wood Natural material Plank Wood stain Rectangle


Once the depth is set, you can make the first cut on the wood body blank.

Wood Automotive tire Hardwood Bumper Wood stain


The cut will most likely not exactly match the skew angle that is marked out, though it should match the 45 degree bed angle. That's OK. Unless you are an engineer and want to do the math, the compound miter causes the angles to skew off a bit. The reason for marking up the blank is to ensure you are cutting everything the right direction.

Now, leaving the bevel angle alone, switch the saw to the opposite 45 degree miter angle and make the second cut. The goal is to have the blade track through the exact same opening where the mouth is going to be.

Wood Table Automotive tire Floor Flooring


Depending on your saw, it may or may not cut clear to the line on the back side. Mine does not, but it's a simple matter to either put in a spacer on the miter saw or finish out the cut with a handsaw, as I did. You can see the difference in the kerf width.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Plank Rectangle


To remove the waste, a couple light blows with mallet and chisel will pop most of it out. The back surface will be rough. That is not a problem, we are going to have to pare it out anyways.

Table Wood Flooring Hardwood Wood stain


Using the frog and iron, measure or mark out about how far back you will need to pare to get everything to fit.

Brown Wood Hardwood Gas Wood stain


Then a hand saw can be used to extend the angles down to that line. Do not cut the mouth itself any deeper, the cut should angle from the mouth opening to the top face.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Plank


With a sharp chisel, pare back the body to your mark. The paring cuts will taper from being wider at the top to just hitting the edge of the saw kerf at the bottom. You'll end up needing to match the skew with this face of the opening. A wider chisel is best, as it allows better registration against the bed that the saw made. Since you may need to be cutting some end grain, make sure the chisel is SHARP.

Wood Tool Gas Hardwood Metalworking hand tool


As you get close, use the iron to check width. A small square can be used to mark a line on the bed perpendicular to the skew angle that will make it a lot easier to see when you are getting close. Once the body is pared back enough to where you can lay the iron in and have about 1/8 inch between the iron and that line, you are good. Do any final paring you want to clean up the surfaces.

Wood Rectangle Material property Hardwood Wood stain


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Plank Brick


Next installment: Feeling froggy
Sorry I have not commented JayT, but I have been keeping up with your blog. Good stuff!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Feeling Froggy

Here's where we left off.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Plank Brick


Mouth opening has been cut and worked to final dimension. Now it's time to get the frog to fit.

A transitional frog has the little bump out on the bottom where the lever cap screw attaches. On an original body, there's a pocket for that part, we just need to recreate it.

Wood Wood stain Door Gas Hardwood


Easiest way to mark it out is to first use a small square to mark a line perpendicular to the bed intersecting the line on the face of the bed. This will be the edge of the frog. Then lay the frog face down and mark the bump out location. Finally, use the frog to determine depth in both directions.

Brown Wood Road surface Flooring Floor


Once this area is marked out, the waste can be chiseled out. You'll need to remove the depth adjuster to check fit, as it extends below the base of the frog.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Plank


Once you have a good fit and are satisfied, mark the back of the frog.

Brown Wood Tree Table Flooring


With whatever tools you have and are comfortable with, you'll need to create a channel so that the depth adjuster can operate freely. I used a couple of gouges and did this by hand, working from the edge of the blank and stopping at the line that marks the back of the frog. There are several other possible ways to accomplish the same thing, only limited by your skills and available tools. If you have a good idea on how to do this easily and cleanly, please share.

Hand tool Wood Tool Burin Metalworking hand tool


Wood Table Flooring Wood stain Floor


Wood Wood stain Automotive tire Hardwood Household hardware


Next up: Hit the gym for some body shaping
 

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Feeling Froggy

Here's where we left off.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Plank Brick


Mouth opening has been cut and worked to final dimension. Now it's time to get the frog to fit.

A transitional frog has the little bump out on the bottom where the lever cap screw attaches. On an original body, there's a pocket for that part, we just need to recreate it.

Wood Wood stain Door Gas Hardwood


Easiest way to mark it out is to first use a small square to mark a line perpendicular to the bed intersecting the line on the face of the bed. This will be the edge of the frog. Then lay the frog face down and mark the bump out location. Finally, use the frog to determine depth in both directions.

Brown Wood Road surface Flooring Floor


Once this area is marked out, the waste can be chiseled out. You'll need to remove the depth adjuster to check fit, as it extends below the base of the frog.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Plank


Once you have a good fit and are satisfied, mark the back of the frog.

Brown Wood Tree Table Flooring


With whatever tools you have and are comfortable with, you'll need to create a channel so that the depth adjuster can operate freely. I used a couple of gouges and did this by hand, working from the edge of the blank and stopping at the line that marks the back of the frog. There are several other possible ways to accomplish the same thing, only limited by your skills and available tools. If you have a good idea on how to do this easily and cleanly, please share.

Hand tool Wood Tool Burin Metalworking hand tool


Wood Table Flooring Wood stain Floor


Wood Wood stain Automotive tire Hardwood Household hardware


Next up: Hit the gym for some body shaping
excellent blog series JayT!!
 

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