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Discussion Starter · #81 ·
Let's make us an iron!

If this is happening a little too slow for your liking, it is because I have to make sawdust all day long to keep the wolf from the door. That is 10 hours gone. Making these little planes and blogging about it is mostly a night time affair, after taking care of normal daily chores and duties!

We have made a plane body and it is looking pretty good! Time to do some metalwork.
This is what we want to achieve:

Ruler Office ruler Wood Tool Rectangle


At the top is the finished plane iron, below is the material I made it from; an old HSS jointer knife.
There are four dimensions that concern us:
1. Blade width.
2. Blade length.
3. Tang width.
4. Tang length.

BLADE WIDTH.

Rectangle Purple Violet Font Magenta


The blade width needs to be a little wider than the width of our finished plane body. Measure the body width and add a wee bit, say 1/16". It can always be fine tuned later on. In the end the blade needs to stick out just a teeny bit past the edge of the plane on each side.

BLADE LENGTH

Textile Art Magenta Petal Pattern


Blade length is determined by measuring the distance as shown in the photo. It is the length of the exposed ramp or landing that was so carefully flattened when we built the plane body.

TANG WIDTH.

Tie Purple Sleeve Violet Jersey


The width of our tang must be a little less than that of the tenon or opening. Theoretically it can be a sliding fit but then everything must be perfectly square and centre. By making this fit a little loose we get some lateral or sideways adjustment. This will ensure that the blade can be set parallel to the sole with equal amounts protruding past the sides.
The 3mm (1/8") difference as shown in the photo will be too much for a real narrow plane like the one I've made here (5/8"width). I think it would be fine for a larger plane. If in doubt, make it only 1/16th, it is easy to grind more at a later stage if necessary.

TANG LENGTH.

Outerwear Sleeve Collar Font Magenta


Obviously it needs to be long enough to go through the plane! It also needs to stick out past the wedge for ease of adjustment. As always, rather make it longer. Again, it is easy to shorten at a later stage, once you are used to the plane.

Font Blank media Electronic device Circle Data storage device


Once all these dimensions are obtained, mark them out on your blade material. Make sure the tang is centered! The HSS I used is hard stuff and nothing I have in the shop will scratch it for marking. I also couldn't find something that would write on it. I covered it with masking tape for easy marking.
I cut with a 4" slim cutting disc in a baby angle grinder. The beauty of HSS is that you don't have to worry about heat; it doesn't affect the material's properties. If you are working on an old plane blade, cut slowly and cool often with water. You don't want the steel to get hot!

Hood Stairs Wood Fender Automotive tire


Once cut, clean the edges on a disc sander or grinding wheel. Ensure that the edges are straight, square and parallel to each other. Time to check the blade for fit in the plane and adjust by more grinding if necessary. You might need to ease the shoulders of the blade for a good fit. Then grind the primary bevel to 25 degrees. I do this on a bench grinder with shop made adjustable rest to get the angle perfect.

If you are using carbon steel, KEEP COOL! Not you, the steel :^) Have a container with water handy and dip very often.

Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Tints and shades


A few swipes on my whetstone to establish the secondary bevel, some polishing with the strop and we are done! I know some likes to use sandpaper for sharpening. Whatever works for you!

Next we'll make the wedge and fine tune our plane. In the meantime, why don't you shave with your new blade tomorrow morning!
 

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·
Registered
Joined
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9,509 Posts
Let's make us an iron!

If this is happening a little too slow for your liking, it is because I have to make sawdust all day long to keep the wolf from the door. That is 10 hours gone. Making these little planes and blogging about it is mostly a night time affair, after taking care of normal daily chores and duties!

We have made a plane body and it is looking pretty good! Time to do some metalwork.
This is what we want to achieve:

Ruler Office ruler Wood Tool Rectangle


At the top is the finished plane iron, below is the material I made it from; an old HSS jointer knife.
There are four dimensions that concern us:
1. Blade width.
2. Blade length.
3. Tang width.
4. Tang length.

BLADE WIDTH.

Rectangle Purple Violet Font Magenta


The blade width needs to be a little wider than the width of our finished plane body. Measure the body width and add a wee bit, say 1/16". It can always be fine tuned later on. In the end the blade needs to stick out just a teeny bit past the edge of the plane on each side.

BLADE LENGTH

Textile Art Magenta Petal Pattern


Blade length is determined by measuring the distance as shown in the photo. It is the length of the exposed ramp or landing that was so carefully flattened when we built the plane body.

TANG WIDTH.

Tie Purple Sleeve Violet Jersey


The width of our tang must be a little less than that of the tenon or opening. Theoretically it can be a sliding fit but then everything must be perfectly square and centre. By making this fit a little loose we get some lateral or sideways adjustment. This will ensure that the blade can be set parallel to the sole with equal amounts protruding past the sides.
The 3mm (1/8") difference as shown in the photo will be too much for a real narrow plane like the one I've made here (5/8"width). I think it would be fine for a larger plane. If in doubt, make it only 1/16th, it is easy to grind more at a later stage if necessary.

TANG LENGTH.

Outerwear Sleeve Collar Font Magenta


Obviously it needs to be long enough to go through the plane! It also needs to stick out past the wedge for ease of adjustment. As always, rather make it longer. Again, it is easy to shorten at a later stage, once you are used to the plane.

Font Blank media Electronic device Circle Data storage device


Once all these dimensions are obtained, mark them out on your blade material. Make sure the tang is centered! The HSS I used is hard stuff and nothing I have in the shop will scratch it for marking. I also couldn't find something that would write on it. I covered it with masking tape for easy marking.
I cut with a 4" slim cutting disc in a baby angle grinder. The beauty of HSS is that you don't have to worry about heat; it doesn't affect the material's properties. If you are working on an old plane blade, cut slowly and cool often with water. You don't want the steel to get hot!

Hood Stairs Wood Fender Automotive tire


Once cut, clean the edges on a disc sander or grinding wheel. Ensure that the edges are straight, square and parallel to each other. Time to check the blade for fit in the plane and adjust by more grinding if necessary. You might need to ease the shoulders of the blade for a good fit. Then grind the primary bevel to 25 degrees. I do this on a bench grinder with shop made adjustable rest to get the angle perfect.

If you are using carbon steel, KEEP COOL! Not you, the steel :^) Have a container with water handy and dip very often.

Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Tints and shades


A few swipes on my whetstone to establish the secondary bevel, some polishing with the strop and we are done! I know some likes to use sandpaper for sharpening. Whatever works for you!

Next we'll make the wedge and fine tune our plane. In the meantime, why don't you shave with your new blade tomorrow morning!
Looks very nice Div. Thanks again for putting all of this together.
 

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Registered
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2,011 Posts
Let's make us an iron!

If this is happening a little too slow for your liking, it is because I have to make sawdust all day long to keep the wolf from the door. That is 10 hours gone. Making these little planes and blogging about it is mostly a night time affair, after taking care of normal daily chores and duties!

We have made a plane body and it is looking pretty good! Time to do some metalwork.
This is what we want to achieve:

Ruler Office ruler Wood Tool Rectangle


At the top is the finished plane iron, below is the material I made it from; an old HSS jointer knife.
There are four dimensions that concern us:
1. Blade width.
2. Blade length.
3. Tang width.
4. Tang length.

BLADE WIDTH.

Rectangle Purple Violet Font Magenta


The blade width needs to be a little wider than the width of our finished plane body. Measure the body width and add a wee bit, say 1/16". It can always be fine tuned later on. In the end the blade needs to stick out just a teeny bit past the edge of the plane on each side.

BLADE LENGTH

Textile Art Magenta Petal Pattern


Blade length is determined by measuring the distance as shown in the photo. It is the length of the exposed ramp or landing that was so carefully flattened when we built the plane body.

TANG WIDTH.

Tie Purple Sleeve Violet Jersey


The width of our tang must be a little less than that of the tenon or opening. Theoretically it can be a sliding fit but then everything must be perfectly square and centre. By making this fit a little loose we get some lateral or sideways adjustment. This will ensure that the blade can be set parallel to the sole with equal amounts protruding past the sides.
The 3mm (1/8") difference as shown in the photo will be too much for a real narrow plane like the one I've made here (5/8"width). I think it would be fine for a larger plane. If in doubt, make it only 1/16th, it is easy to grind more at a later stage if necessary.

TANG LENGTH.

Outerwear Sleeve Collar Font Magenta


Obviously it needs to be long enough to go through the plane! It also needs to stick out past the wedge for ease of adjustment. As always, rather make it longer. Again, it is easy to shorten at a later stage, once you are used to the plane.

Font Blank media Electronic device Circle Data storage device


Once all these dimensions are obtained, mark them out on your blade material. Make sure the tang is centered! The HSS I used is hard stuff and nothing I have in the shop will scratch it for marking. I also couldn't find something that would write on it. I covered it with masking tape for easy marking.
I cut with a 4" slim cutting disc in a baby angle grinder. The beauty of HSS is that you don't have to worry about heat; it doesn't affect the material's properties. If you are working on an old plane blade, cut slowly and cool often with water. You don't want the steel to get hot!

Hood Stairs Wood Fender Automotive tire


Once cut, clean the edges on a disc sander or grinding wheel. Ensure that the edges are straight, square and parallel to each other. Time to check the blade for fit in the plane and adjust by more grinding if necessary. You might need to ease the shoulders of the blade for a good fit. Then grind the primary bevel to 25 degrees. I do this on a bench grinder with shop made adjustable rest to get the angle perfect.

If you are using carbon steel, KEEP COOL! Not you, the steel :^) Have a container with water handy and dip very often.

Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Tints and shades


A few swipes on my whetstone to establish the secondary bevel, some polishing with the strop and we are done! I know some likes to use sandpaper for sharpening. Whatever works for you!

Next we'll make the wedge and fine tune our plane. In the meantime, why don't you shave with your new blade tomorrow morning!
Div, Here's another one for the notebook. Thanks.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
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6,114 Posts
Let's make us an iron!

If this is happening a little too slow for your liking, it is because I have to make sawdust all day long to keep the wolf from the door. That is 10 hours gone. Making these little planes and blogging about it is mostly a night time affair, after taking care of normal daily chores and duties!

We have made a plane body and it is looking pretty good! Time to do some metalwork.
This is what we want to achieve:

Ruler Office ruler Wood Tool Rectangle


At the top is the finished plane iron, below is the material I made it from; an old HSS jointer knife.
There are four dimensions that concern us:
1. Blade width.
2. Blade length.
3. Tang width.
4. Tang length.

BLADE WIDTH.

Rectangle Purple Violet Font Magenta


The blade width needs to be a little wider than the width of our finished plane body. Measure the body width and add a wee bit, say 1/16". It can always be fine tuned later on. In the end the blade needs to stick out just a teeny bit past the edge of the plane on each side.

BLADE LENGTH

Textile Art Magenta Petal Pattern


Blade length is determined by measuring the distance as shown in the photo. It is the length of the exposed ramp or landing that was so carefully flattened when we built the plane body.

TANG WIDTH.

Tie Purple Sleeve Violet Jersey


The width of our tang must be a little less than that of the tenon or opening. Theoretically it can be a sliding fit but then everything must be perfectly square and centre. By making this fit a little loose we get some lateral or sideways adjustment. This will ensure that the blade can be set parallel to the sole with equal amounts protruding past the sides.
The 3mm (1/8") difference as shown in the photo will be too much for a real narrow plane like the one I've made here (5/8"width). I think it would be fine for a larger plane. If in doubt, make it only 1/16th, it is easy to grind more at a later stage if necessary.

TANG LENGTH.

Outerwear Sleeve Collar Font Magenta


Obviously it needs to be long enough to go through the plane! It also needs to stick out past the wedge for ease of adjustment. As always, rather make it longer. Again, it is easy to shorten at a later stage, once you are used to the plane.

Font Blank media Electronic device Circle Data storage device


Once all these dimensions are obtained, mark them out on your blade material. Make sure the tang is centered! The HSS I used is hard stuff and nothing I have in the shop will scratch it for marking. I also couldn't find something that would write on it. I covered it with masking tape for easy marking.
I cut with a 4" slim cutting disc in a baby angle grinder. The beauty of HSS is that you don't have to worry about heat; it doesn't affect the material's properties. If you are working on an old plane blade, cut slowly and cool often with water. You don't want the steel to get hot!

Hood Stairs Wood Fender Automotive tire


Once cut, clean the edges on a disc sander or grinding wheel. Ensure that the edges are straight, square and parallel to each other. Time to check the blade for fit in the plane and adjust by more grinding if necessary. You might need to ease the shoulders of the blade for a good fit. Then grind the primary bevel to 25 degrees. I do this on a bench grinder with shop made adjustable rest to get the angle perfect.

If you are using carbon steel, KEEP COOL! Not you, the steel :^) Have a container with water handy and dip very often.

Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Tints and shades


A few swipes on my whetstone to establish the secondary bevel, some polishing with the strop and we are done! I know some likes to use sandpaper for sharpening. Whatever works for you!

Next we'll make the wedge and fine tune our plane. In the meantime, why don't you shave with your new blade tomorrow morning!
Looking good!!!
I envy that thick steel.
Do you really mean a 3mm slip for the tang? I made only 1/3 mm slip for it.


Please look at this brother, and if you have doubt 'yes I'm really happy I managed' laugh.

Best of my thoughts,
Mads
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
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11,632 Posts
Let's make us an iron!

If this is happening a little too slow for your liking, it is because I have to make sawdust all day long to keep the wolf from the door. That is 10 hours gone. Making these little planes and blogging about it is mostly a night time affair, after taking care of normal daily chores and duties!

We have made a plane body and it is looking pretty good! Time to do some metalwork.
This is what we want to achieve:

Ruler Office ruler Wood Tool Rectangle


At the top is the finished plane iron, below is the material I made it from; an old HSS jointer knife.
There are four dimensions that concern us:
1. Blade width.
2. Blade length.
3. Tang width.
4. Tang length.

BLADE WIDTH.

Rectangle Purple Violet Font Magenta


The blade width needs to be a little wider than the width of our finished plane body. Measure the body width and add a wee bit, say 1/16". It can always be fine tuned later on. In the end the blade needs to stick out just a teeny bit past the edge of the plane on each side.

BLADE LENGTH

Textile Art Magenta Petal Pattern


Blade length is determined by measuring the distance as shown in the photo. It is the length of the exposed ramp or landing that was so carefully flattened when we built the plane body.

TANG WIDTH.

Tie Purple Sleeve Violet Jersey


The width of our tang must be a little less than that of the tenon or opening. Theoretically it can be a sliding fit but then everything must be perfectly square and centre. By making this fit a little loose we get some lateral or sideways adjustment. This will ensure that the blade can be set parallel to the sole with equal amounts protruding past the sides.
The 3mm (1/8") difference as shown in the photo will be too much for a real narrow plane like the one I've made here (5/8"width). I think it would be fine for a larger plane. If in doubt, make it only 1/16th, it is easy to grind more at a later stage if necessary.

TANG LENGTH.

Outerwear Sleeve Collar Font Magenta


Obviously it needs to be long enough to go through the plane! It also needs to stick out past the wedge for ease of adjustment. As always, rather make it longer. Again, it is easy to shorten at a later stage, once you are used to the plane.

Font Blank media Electronic device Circle Data storage device


Once all these dimensions are obtained, mark them out on your blade material. Make sure the tang is centered! The HSS I used is hard stuff and nothing I have in the shop will scratch it for marking. I also couldn't find something that would write on it. I covered it with masking tape for easy marking.
I cut with a 4" slim cutting disc in a baby angle grinder. The beauty of HSS is that you don't have to worry about heat; it doesn't affect the material's properties. If you are working on an old plane blade, cut slowly and cool often with water. You don't want the steel to get hot!

Hood Stairs Wood Fender Automotive tire


Once cut, clean the edges on a disc sander or grinding wheel. Ensure that the edges are straight, square and parallel to each other. Time to check the blade for fit in the plane and adjust by more grinding if necessary. You might need to ease the shoulders of the blade for a good fit. Then grind the primary bevel to 25 degrees. I do this on a bench grinder with shop made adjustable rest to get the angle perfect.

If you are using carbon steel, KEEP COOL! Not you, the steel :^) Have a container with water handy and dip very often.

Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Tints and shades


A few swipes on my whetstone to establish the secondary bevel, some polishing with the strop and we are done! I know some likes to use sandpaper for sharpening. Whatever works for you!

Next we'll make the wedge and fine tune our plane. In the meantime, why don't you shave with your new blade tomorrow morning!
^me too, Mads. Mine seems wimpy in comparison.
 

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Registered
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739 Posts
Discussion Starter · #86 ·
Let's make us an iron!

If this is happening a little too slow for your liking, it is because I have to make sawdust all day long to keep the wolf from the door. That is 10 hours gone. Making these little planes and blogging about it is mostly a night time affair, after taking care of normal daily chores and duties!

We have made a plane body and it is looking pretty good! Time to do some metalwork.
This is what we want to achieve:

Ruler Office ruler Wood Tool Rectangle


At the top is the finished plane iron, below is the material I made it from; an old HSS jointer knife.
There are four dimensions that concern us:
1. Blade width.
2. Blade length.
3. Tang width.
4. Tang length.

BLADE WIDTH.

Rectangle Purple Violet Font Magenta


The blade width needs to be a little wider than the width of our finished plane body. Measure the body width and add a wee bit, say 1/16". It can always be fine tuned later on. In the end the blade needs to stick out just a teeny bit past the edge of the plane on each side.

BLADE LENGTH

Textile Art Magenta Petal Pattern


Blade length is determined by measuring the distance as shown in the photo. It is the length of the exposed ramp or landing that was so carefully flattened when we built the plane body.

TANG WIDTH.

Tie Purple Sleeve Violet Jersey


The width of our tang must be a little less than that of the tenon or opening. Theoretically it can be a sliding fit but then everything must be perfectly square and centre. By making this fit a little loose we get some lateral or sideways adjustment. This will ensure that the blade can be set parallel to the sole with equal amounts protruding past the sides.
The 3mm (1/8") difference as shown in the photo will be too much for a real narrow plane like the one I've made here (5/8"width). I think it would be fine for a larger plane. If in doubt, make it only 1/16th, it is easy to grind more at a later stage if necessary.

TANG LENGTH.

Outerwear Sleeve Collar Font Magenta


Obviously it needs to be long enough to go through the plane! It also needs to stick out past the wedge for ease of adjustment. As always, rather make it longer. Again, it is easy to shorten at a later stage, once you are used to the plane.

Font Blank media Electronic device Circle Data storage device


Once all these dimensions are obtained, mark them out on your blade material. Make sure the tang is centered! The HSS I used is hard stuff and nothing I have in the shop will scratch it for marking. I also couldn't find something that would write on it. I covered it with masking tape for easy marking.
I cut with a 4" slim cutting disc in a baby angle grinder. The beauty of HSS is that you don't have to worry about heat; it doesn't affect the material's properties. If you are working on an old plane blade, cut slowly and cool often with water. You don't want the steel to get hot!

Hood Stairs Wood Fender Automotive tire


Once cut, clean the edges on a disc sander or grinding wheel. Ensure that the edges are straight, square and parallel to each other. Time to check the blade for fit in the plane and adjust by more grinding if necessary. You might need to ease the shoulders of the blade for a good fit. Then grind the primary bevel to 25 degrees. I do this on a bench grinder with shop made adjustable rest to get the angle perfect.

If you are using carbon steel, KEEP COOL! Not you, the steel :^) Have a container with water handy and dip very often.

Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Tints and shades


A few swipes on my whetstone to establish the secondary bevel, some polishing with the strop and we are done! I know some likes to use sandpaper for sharpening. Whatever works for you!

Next we'll make the wedge and fine tune our plane. In the meantime, why don't you shave with your new blade tomorrow morning!
Mads, 3mm slip on a large plane, say 25mm wide. Your plane is very small. Plus, I know you work accurately. In theory, no slip is neccessary if everything can be done precisely :^) In the text I suggested 1,5mm just to make it easier for first time builders.
That HSS is 3mm thick, one of the reasons I like it. Even though the thickness is not really neccessary, it still just looks good! :^)
I waited a long time and downloaded the video…Looks wonderful! Do you really plane that fast or is it just the video? I would be dead at the end of the day at that speed….

Al, thick is not necessary, just ask Paul Sellers :^) It just makes me feel…kind of japanese I guess! When do we see yours?

Wayne, no problem, I actually enjoy it. Just wish I had more time for it….

Rand, you might recognize some of the photos :^) I had some other LJ's asking for pics, decided to blog it.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
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11,632 Posts
Let's make us an iron!

If this is happening a little too slow for your liking, it is because I have to make sawdust all day long to keep the wolf from the door. That is 10 hours gone. Making these little planes and blogging about it is mostly a night time affair, after taking care of normal daily chores and duties!

We have made a plane body and it is looking pretty good! Time to do some metalwork.
This is what we want to achieve:

Ruler Office ruler Wood Tool Rectangle


At the top is the finished plane iron, below is the material I made it from; an old HSS jointer knife.
There are four dimensions that concern us:
1. Blade width.
2. Blade length.
3. Tang width.
4. Tang length.

BLADE WIDTH.

Rectangle Purple Violet Font Magenta


The blade width needs to be a little wider than the width of our finished plane body. Measure the body width and add a wee bit, say 1/16". It can always be fine tuned later on. In the end the blade needs to stick out just a teeny bit past the edge of the plane on each side.

BLADE LENGTH

Textile Art Magenta Petal Pattern


Blade length is determined by measuring the distance as shown in the photo. It is the length of the exposed ramp or landing that was so carefully flattened when we built the plane body.

TANG WIDTH.

Tie Purple Sleeve Violet Jersey


The width of our tang must be a little less than that of the tenon or opening. Theoretically it can be a sliding fit but then everything must be perfectly square and centre. By making this fit a little loose we get some lateral or sideways adjustment. This will ensure that the blade can be set parallel to the sole with equal amounts protruding past the sides.
The 3mm (1/8") difference as shown in the photo will be too much for a real narrow plane like the one I've made here (5/8"width). I think it would be fine for a larger plane. If in doubt, make it only 1/16th, it is easy to grind more at a later stage if necessary.

TANG LENGTH.

Outerwear Sleeve Collar Font Magenta


Obviously it needs to be long enough to go through the plane! It also needs to stick out past the wedge for ease of adjustment. As always, rather make it longer. Again, it is easy to shorten at a later stage, once you are used to the plane.

Font Blank media Electronic device Circle Data storage device


Once all these dimensions are obtained, mark them out on your blade material. Make sure the tang is centered! The HSS I used is hard stuff and nothing I have in the shop will scratch it for marking. I also couldn't find something that would write on it. I covered it with masking tape for easy marking.
I cut with a 4" slim cutting disc in a baby angle grinder. The beauty of HSS is that you don't have to worry about heat; it doesn't affect the material's properties. If you are working on an old plane blade, cut slowly and cool often with water. You don't want the steel to get hot!

Hood Stairs Wood Fender Automotive tire


Once cut, clean the edges on a disc sander or grinding wheel. Ensure that the edges are straight, square and parallel to each other. Time to check the blade for fit in the plane and adjust by more grinding if necessary. You might need to ease the shoulders of the blade for a good fit. Then grind the primary bevel to 25 degrees. I do this on a bench grinder with shop made adjustable rest to get the angle perfect.

If you are using carbon steel, KEEP COOL! Not you, the steel :^) Have a container with water handy and dip very often.

Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Tints and shades


A few swipes on my whetstone to establish the secondary bevel, some polishing with the strop and we are done! I know some likes to use sandpaper for sharpening. Whatever works for you!

Next we'll make the wedge and fine tune our plane. In the meantime, why don't you shave with your new blade tomorrow morning!
Div, mine's over in my blog titled "Div Inspired"! I used an old Stanley as substrate, very non-Japanese. Paul would approve!
 

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Registered
Joined
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9,309 Posts
Let's make us an iron!

If this is happening a little too slow for your liking, it is because I have to make sawdust all day long to keep the wolf from the door. That is 10 hours gone. Making these little planes and blogging about it is mostly a night time affair, after taking care of normal daily chores and duties!

We have made a plane body and it is looking pretty good! Time to do some metalwork.
This is what we want to achieve:

Ruler Office ruler Wood Tool Rectangle


At the top is the finished plane iron, below is the material I made it from; an old HSS jointer knife.
There are four dimensions that concern us:
1. Blade width.
2. Blade length.
3. Tang width.
4. Tang length.

BLADE WIDTH.

Rectangle Purple Violet Font Magenta


The blade width needs to be a little wider than the width of our finished plane body. Measure the body width and add a wee bit, say 1/16". It can always be fine tuned later on. In the end the blade needs to stick out just a teeny bit past the edge of the plane on each side.

BLADE LENGTH

Textile Art Magenta Petal Pattern


Blade length is determined by measuring the distance as shown in the photo. It is the length of the exposed ramp or landing that was so carefully flattened when we built the plane body.

TANG WIDTH.

Tie Purple Sleeve Violet Jersey


The width of our tang must be a little less than that of the tenon or opening. Theoretically it can be a sliding fit but then everything must be perfectly square and centre. By making this fit a little loose we get some lateral or sideways adjustment. This will ensure that the blade can be set parallel to the sole with equal amounts protruding past the sides.
The 3mm (1/8") difference as shown in the photo will be too much for a real narrow plane like the one I've made here (5/8"width). I think it would be fine for a larger plane. If in doubt, make it only 1/16th, it is easy to grind more at a later stage if necessary.

TANG LENGTH.

Outerwear Sleeve Collar Font Magenta


Obviously it needs to be long enough to go through the plane! It also needs to stick out past the wedge for ease of adjustment. As always, rather make it longer. Again, it is easy to shorten at a later stage, once you are used to the plane.

Font Blank media Electronic device Circle Data storage device


Once all these dimensions are obtained, mark them out on your blade material. Make sure the tang is centered! The HSS I used is hard stuff and nothing I have in the shop will scratch it for marking. I also couldn't find something that would write on it. I covered it with masking tape for easy marking.
I cut with a 4" slim cutting disc in a baby angle grinder. The beauty of HSS is that you don't have to worry about heat; it doesn't affect the material's properties. If you are working on an old plane blade, cut slowly and cool often with water. You don't want the steel to get hot!

Hood Stairs Wood Fender Automotive tire


Once cut, clean the edges on a disc sander or grinding wheel. Ensure that the edges are straight, square and parallel to each other. Time to check the blade for fit in the plane and adjust by more grinding if necessary. You might need to ease the shoulders of the blade for a good fit. Then grind the primary bevel to 25 degrees. I do this on a bench grinder with shop made adjustable rest to get the angle perfect.

If you are using carbon steel, KEEP COOL! Not you, the steel :^) Have a container with water handy and dip very often.

Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Tints and shades


A few swipes on my whetstone to establish the secondary bevel, some polishing with the strop and we are done! I know some likes to use sandpaper for sharpening. Whatever works for you!

Next we'll make the wedge and fine tune our plane. In the meantime, why don't you shave with your new blade tomorrow morning!
you guys are something special

crystal clear instructions

thank you
 

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Registered
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6,114 Posts
Let's make us an iron!

If this is happening a little too slow for your liking, it is because I have to make sawdust all day long to keep the wolf from the door. That is 10 hours gone. Making these little planes and blogging about it is mostly a night time affair, after taking care of normal daily chores and duties!

We have made a plane body and it is looking pretty good! Time to do some metalwork.
This is what we want to achieve:

Ruler Office ruler Wood Tool Rectangle


At the top is the finished plane iron, below is the material I made it from; an old HSS jointer knife.
There are four dimensions that concern us:
1. Blade width.
2. Blade length.
3. Tang width.
4. Tang length.

BLADE WIDTH.

Rectangle Purple Violet Font Magenta


The blade width needs to be a little wider than the width of our finished plane body. Measure the body width and add a wee bit, say 1/16". It can always be fine tuned later on. In the end the blade needs to stick out just a teeny bit past the edge of the plane on each side.

BLADE LENGTH

Textile Art Magenta Petal Pattern


Blade length is determined by measuring the distance as shown in the photo. It is the length of the exposed ramp or landing that was so carefully flattened when we built the plane body.

TANG WIDTH.

Tie Purple Sleeve Violet Jersey


The width of our tang must be a little less than that of the tenon or opening. Theoretically it can be a sliding fit but then everything must be perfectly square and centre. By making this fit a little loose we get some lateral or sideways adjustment. This will ensure that the blade can be set parallel to the sole with equal amounts protruding past the sides.
The 3mm (1/8") difference as shown in the photo will be too much for a real narrow plane like the one I've made here (5/8"width). I think it would be fine for a larger plane. If in doubt, make it only 1/16th, it is easy to grind more at a later stage if necessary.

TANG LENGTH.

Outerwear Sleeve Collar Font Magenta


Obviously it needs to be long enough to go through the plane! It also needs to stick out past the wedge for ease of adjustment. As always, rather make it longer. Again, it is easy to shorten at a later stage, once you are used to the plane.

Font Blank media Electronic device Circle Data storage device


Once all these dimensions are obtained, mark them out on your blade material. Make sure the tang is centered! The HSS I used is hard stuff and nothing I have in the shop will scratch it for marking. I also couldn't find something that would write on it. I covered it with masking tape for easy marking.
I cut with a 4" slim cutting disc in a baby angle grinder. The beauty of HSS is that you don't have to worry about heat; it doesn't affect the material's properties. If you are working on an old plane blade, cut slowly and cool often with water. You don't want the steel to get hot!

Hood Stairs Wood Fender Automotive tire


Once cut, clean the edges on a disc sander or grinding wheel. Ensure that the edges are straight, square and parallel to each other. Time to check the blade for fit in the plane and adjust by more grinding if necessary. You might need to ease the shoulders of the blade for a good fit. Then grind the primary bevel to 25 degrees. I do this on a bench grinder with shop made adjustable rest to get the angle perfect.

If you are using carbon steel, KEEP COOL! Not you, the steel :^) Have a container with water handy and dip very often.

Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Tints and shades


A few swipes on my whetstone to establish the secondary bevel, some polishing with the strop and we are done! I know some likes to use sandpaper for sharpening. Whatever works for you!

Next we'll make the wedge and fine tune our plane. In the meantime, why don't you shave with your new blade tomorrow morning!
On my version I think actually a thick Iron would make a difference for the stability.
No I do not plane that fast normally, but I was really happy, and then you know how we kids are!
 

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Discussion Starter · #90 ·
Let's make us an iron!

If this is happening a little too slow for your liking, it is because I have to make sawdust all day long to keep the wolf from the door. That is 10 hours gone. Making these little planes and blogging about it is mostly a night time affair, after taking care of normal daily chores and duties!

We have made a plane body and it is looking pretty good! Time to do some metalwork.
This is what we want to achieve:

Ruler Office ruler Wood Tool Rectangle


At the top is the finished plane iron, below is the material I made it from; an old HSS jointer knife.
There are four dimensions that concern us:
1. Blade width.
2. Blade length.
3. Tang width.
4. Tang length.

BLADE WIDTH.

Rectangle Purple Violet Font Magenta


The blade width needs to be a little wider than the width of our finished plane body. Measure the body width and add a wee bit, say 1/16". It can always be fine tuned later on. In the end the blade needs to stick out just a teeny bit past the edge of the plane on each side.

BLADE LENGTH

Textile Art Magenta Petal Pattern


Blade length is determined by measuring the distance as shown in the photo. It is the length of the exposed ramp or landing that was so carefully flattened when we built the plane body.

TANG WIDTH.

Tie Purple Sleeve Violet Jersey


The width of our tang must be a little less than that of the tenon or opening. Theoretically it can be a sliding fit but then everything must be perfectly square and centre. By making this fit a little loose we get some lateral or sideways adjustment. This will ensure that the blade can be set parallel to the sole with equal amounts protruding past the sides.
The 3mm (1/8") difference as shown in the photo will be too much for a real narrow plane like the one I've made here (5/8"width). I think it would be fine for a larger plane. If in doubt, make it only 1/16th, it is easy to grind more at a later stage if necessary.

TANG LENGTH.

Outerwear Sleeve Collar Font Magenta


Obviously it needs to be long enough to go through the plane! It also needs to stick out past the wedge for ease of adjustment. As always, rather make it longer. Again, it is easy to shorten at a later stage, once you are used to the plane.

Font Blank media Electronic device Circle Data storage device


Once all these dimensions are obtained, mark them out on your blade material. Make sure the tang is centered! The HSS I used is hard stuff and nothing I have in the shop will scratch it for marking. I also couldn't find something that would write on it. I covered it with masking tape for easy marking.
I cut with a 4" slim cutting disc in a baby angle grinder. The beauty of HSS is that you don't have to worry about heat; it doesn't affect the material's properties. If you are working on an old plane blade, cut slowly and cool often with water. You don't want the steel to get hot!

Hood Stairs Wood Fender Automotive tire


Once cut, clean the edges on a disc sander or grinding wheel. Ensure that the edges are straight, square and parallel to each other. Time to check the blade for fit in the plane and adjust by more grinding if necessary. You might need to ease the shoulders of the blade for a good fit. Then grind the primary bevel to 25 degrees. I do this on a bench grinder with shop made adjustable rest to get the angle perfect.

If you are using carbon steel, KEEP COOL! Not you, the steel :^) Have a container with water handy and dip very often.

Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Tints and shades


A few swipes on my whetstone to establish the secondary bevel, some polishing with the strop and we are done! I know some likes to use sandpaper for sharpening. Whatever works for you!

Next we'll make the wedge and fine tune our plane. In the meantime, why don't you shave with your new blade tomorrow morning!
David, glad it makes sense. Trust you are well in your piece of heaven!

Mads, I laugh! Excitement takes over. The rhykenology kids! It is my bedtime now, M is asleep already! We talk again tomorrow night….
 

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Registered
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967 Posts
Let's make us an iron!

If this is happening a little too slow for your liking, it is because I have to make sawdust all day long to keep the wolf from the door. That is 10 hours gone. Making these little planes and blogging about it is mostly a night time affair, after taking care of normal daily chores and duties!

We have made a plane body and it is looking pretty good! Time to do some metalwork.
This is what we want to achieve:

Ruler Office ruler Wood Tool Rectangle


At the top is the finished plane iron, below is the material I made it from; an old HSS jointer knife.
There are four dimensions that concern us:
1. Blade width.
2. Blade length.
3. Tang width.
4. Tang length.

BLADE WIDTH.

Rectangle Purple Violet Font Magenta


The blade width needs to be a little wider than the width of our finished plane body. Measure the body width and add a wee bit, say 1/16". It can always be fine tuned later on. In the end the blade needs to stick out just a teeny bit past the edge of the plane on each side.

BLADE LENGTH

Textile Art Magenta Petal Pattern


Blade length is determined by measuring the distance as shown in the photo. It is the length of the exposed ramp or landing that was so carefully flattened when we built the plane body.

TANG WIDTH.

Tie Purple Sleeve Violet Jersey


The width of our tang must be a little less than that of the tenon or opening. Theoretically it can be a sliding fit but then everything must be perfectly square and centre. By making this fit a little loose we get some lateral or sideways adjustment. This will ensure that the blade can be set parallel to the sole with equal amounts protruding past the sides.
The 3mm (1/8") difference as shown in the photo will be too much for a real narrow plane like the one I've made here (5/8"width). I think it would be fine for a larger plane. If in doubt, make it only 1/16th, it is easy to grind more at a later stage if necessary.

TANG LENGTH.

Outerwear Sleeve Collar Font Magenta


Obviously it needs to be long enough to go through the plane! It also needs to stick out past the wedge for ease of adjustment. As always, rather make it longer. Again, it is easy to shorten at a later stage, once you are used to the plane.

Font Blank media Electronic device Circle Data storage device


Once all these dimensions are obtained, mark them out on your blade material. Make sure the tang is centered! The HSS I used is hard stuff and nothing I have in the shop will scratch it for marking. I also couldn't find something that would write on it. I covered it with masking tape for easy marking.
I cut with a 4" slim cutting disc in a baby angle grinder. The beauty of HSS is that you don't have to worry about heat; it doesn't affect the material's properties. If you are working on an old plane blade, cut slowly and cool often with water. You don't want the steel to get hot!

Hood Stairs Wood Fender Automotive tire


Once cut, clean the edges on a disc sander or grinding wheel. Ensure that the edges are straight, square and parallel to each other. Time to check the blade for fit in the plane and adjust by more grinding if necessary. You might need to ease the shoulders of the blade for a good fit. Then grind the primary bevel to 25 degrees. I do this on a bench grinder with shop made adjustable rest to get the angle perfect.

If you are using carbon steel, KEEP COOL! Not you, the steel :^) Have a container with water handy and dip very often.

Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Tints and shades


A few swipes on my whetstone to establish the secondary bevel, some polishing with the strop and we are done! I know some likes to use sandpaper for sharpening. Whatever works for you!

Next we'll make the wedge and fine tune our plane. In the meantime, why don't you shave with your new blade tomorrow morning!
Hi Div.

Looking better and better!
 

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In Loving Memory
Joined
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8,391 Posts
Let's make us an iron!

If this is happening a little too slow for your liking, it is because I have to make sawdust all day long to keep the wolf from the door. That is 10 hours gone. Making these little planes and blogging about it is mostly a night time affair, after taking care of normal daily chores and duties!

We have made a plane body and it is looking pretty good! Time to do some metalwork.
This is what we want to achieve:

Ruler Office ruler Wood Tool Rectangle


At the top is the finished plane iron, below is the material I made it from; an old HSS jointer knife.
There are four dimensions that concern us:
1. Blade width.
2. Blade length.
3. Tang width.
4. Tang length.

BLADE WIDTH.

Rectangle Purple Violet Font Magenta


The blade width needs to be a little wider than the width of our finished plane body. Measure the body width and add a wee bit, say 1/16". It can always be fine tuned later on. In the end the blade needs to stick out just a teeny bit past the edge of the plane on each side.

BLADE LENGTH

Textile Art Magenta Petal Pattern


Blade length is determined by measuring the distance as shown in the photo. It is the length of the exposed ramp or landing that was so carefully flattened when we built the plane body.

TANG WIDTH.

Tie Purple Sleeve Violet Jersey


The width of our tang must be a little less than that of the tenon or opening. Theoretically it can be a sliding fit but then everything must be perfectly square and centre. By making this fit a little loose we get some lateral or sideways adjustment. This will ensure that the blade can be set parallel to the sole with equal amounts protruding past the sides.
The 3mm (1/8") difference as shown in the photo will be too much for a real narrow plane like the one I've made here (5/8"width). I think it would be fine for a larger plane. If in doubt, make it only 1/16th, it is easy to grind more at a later stage if necessary.

TANG LENGTH.

Outerwear Sleeve Collar Font Magenta


Obviously it needs to be long enough to go through the plane! It also needs to stick out past the wedge for ease of adjustment. As always, rather make it longer. Again, it is easy to shorten at a later stage, once you are used to the plane.

Font Blank media Electronic device Circle Data storage device


Once all these dimensions are obtained, mark them out on your blade material. Make sure the tang is centered! The HSS I used is hard stuff and nothing I have in the shop will scratch it for marking. I also couldn't find something that would write on it. I covered it with masking tape for easy marking.
I cut with a 4" slim cutting disc in a baby angle grinder. The beauty of HSS is that you don't have to worry about heat; it doesn't affect the material's properties. If you are working on an old plane blade, cut slowly and cool often with water. You don't want the steel to get hot!

Hood Stairs Wood Fender Automotive tire


Once cut, clean the edges on a disc sander or grinding wheel. Ensure that the edges are straight, square and parallel to each other. Time to check the blade for fit in the plane and adjust by more grinding if necessary. You might need to ease the shoulders of the blade for a good fit. Then grind the primary bevel to 25 degrees. I do this on a bench grinder with shop made adjustable rest to get the angle perfect.

If you are using carbon steel, KEEP COOL! Not you, the steel :^) Have a container with water handy and dip very often.

Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Tints and shades


A few swipes on my whetstone to establish the secondary bevel, some polishing with the strop and we are done! I know some likes to use sandpaper for sharpening. Whatever works for you!

Next we'll make the wedge and fine tune our plane. In the meantime, why don't you shave with your new blade tomorrow morning!
Lots of different options. I like that. Thanks Div.
 

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Registered
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682 Posts
Let's make us an iron!

If this is happening a little too slow for your liking, it is because I have to make sawdust all day long to keep the wolf from the door. That is 10 hours gone. Making these little planes and blogging about it is mostly a night time affair, after taking care of normal daily chores and duties!

We have made a plane body and it is looking pretty good! Time to do some metalwork.
This is what we want to achieve:



At the top is the finished plane iron, below is the material I made it from; an old HSS jointer knife.
There are four dimensions that concern us:
1. Blade width.
2. Blade length.
3. Tang width.
4. Tang length.

BLADE WIDTH.



The blade width needs to be a little wider than the width of our finished plane body. Measure the body width and add a wee bit, say 1/16". It can always be fine tuned later on. In the end the blade needs to stick out just a teeny bit past the edge of the plane on each side.

BLADE LENGTH



Blade length is determined by measuring the distance as shown in the photo. It is the length of the exposed ramp or landing that was so carefully flattened when we built the plane body.

TANG WIDTH.



The width of our tang must be a little less than that of the tenon or opening. Theoretically it can be a sliding fit but then everything must be perfectly square and centre. By making this fit a little loose we get some lateral or sideways adjustment. This will ensure that the blade can be set parallel to the sole with equal amounts protruding past the sides.
The 3mm (1/8") difference as shown in the photo will be too much for a real narrow plane like the one I've made here (5/8"width). I think it would be fine for a larger plane. If in doubt, make it only 1/16th, it is easy to grind more at a later stage if necessary.

TANG LENGTH.



Obviously it needs to be long enough to go through the plane! It also needs to stick out past the wedge for ease of adjustment. As always, rather make it longer. Again, it is easy to shorten at a later stage, once you are used to the plane.



Once all these dimensions are obtained, mark them out on your blade material. Make sure the tang is centered! The HSS I used is hard stuff and nothing I have in the shop will scratch it for marking. I also couldn't find something that would write on it. I covered it with masking tape for easy marking.
I cut with a 4" slim cutting disc in a baby angle grinder. The beauty of HSS is that you don't have to worry about heat; it doesn't affect the material's properties. If you are working on an old plane blade, cut slowly and cool often with water. You don't want the steel to get hot!



Once cut, clean the edges on a disc sander or grinding wheel. Ensure that the edges are straight, square and parallel to each other. Time to check the blade for fit in the plane and adjust by more grinding if necessary. You might need to ease the shoulders of the blade for a good fit. Then grind the primary bevel to 25 degrees. I do this on a bench grinder with shop made adjustable rest to get the angle perfect.

If you are using carbon steel, KEEP COOL! Not you, the steel :^) Have a container with water handy and dip very often.



A few swipes on my whetstone to establish the secondary bevel, some polishing with the strop and we are done! I know some likes to use sandpaper for sharpening. Whatever works for you!

Next we'll make the wedge and fine tune our plane. In the meantime, why don't you shave with your new blade tomorrow morning!
Great instructions Div. Even I could do this, and I will.
 

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Registered
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3,086 Posts
Let's make us an iron!

If this is happening a little too slow for your liking, it is because I have to make sawdust all day long to keep the wolf from the door. That is 10 hours gone. Making these little planes and blogging about it is mostly a night time affair, after taking care of normal daily chores and duties!

We have made a plane body and it is looking pretty good! Time to do some metalwork.
This is what we want to achieve:

Ruler Office ruler Wood Tool Rectangle


At the top is the finished plane iron, below is the material I made it from; an old HSS jointer knife.
There are four dimensions that concern us:
1. Blade width.
2. Blade length.
3. Tang width.
4. Tang length.

BLADE WIDTH.

Rectangle Purple Violet Font Magenta


The blade width needs to be a little wider than the width of our finished plane body. Measure the body width and add a wee bit, say 1/16". It can always be fine tuned later on. In the end the blade needs to stick out just a teeny bit past the edge of the plane on each side.

BLADE LENGTH

Textile Art Magenta Petal Pattern


Blade length is determined by measuring the distance as shown in the photo. It is the length of the exposed ramp or landing that was so carefully flattened when we built the plane body.

TANG WIDTH.

Tie Purple Sleeve Violet Jersey


The width of our tang must be a little less than that of the tenon or opening. Theoretically it can be a sliding fit but then everything must be perfectly square and centre. By making this fit a little loose we get some lateral or sideways adjustment. This will ensure that the blade can be set parallel to the sole with equal amounts protruding past the sides.
The 3mm (1/8") difference as shown in the photo will be too much for a real narrow plane like the one I've made here (5/8"width). I think it would be fine for a larger plane. If in doubt, make it only 1/16th, it is easy to grind more at a later stage if necessary.

TANG LENGTH.

Outerwear Sleeve Collar Font Magenta


Obviously it needs to be long enough to go through the plane! It also needs to stick out past the wedge for ease of adjustment. As always, rather make it longer. Again, it is easy to shorten at a later stage, once you are used to the plane.

Font Blank media Electronic device Circle Data storage device


Once all these dimensions are obtained, mark them out on your blade material. Make sure the tang is centered! The HSS I used is hard stuff and nothing I have in the shop will scratch it for marking. I also couldn't find something that would write on it. I covered it with masking tape for easy marking.
I cut with a 4" slim cutting disc in a baby angle grinder. The beauty of HSS is that you don't have to worry about heat; it doesn't affect the material's properties. If you are working on an old plane blade, cut slowly and cool often with water. You don't want the steel to get hot!

Hood Stairs Wood Fender Automotive tire


Once cut, clean the edges on a disc sander or grinding wheel. Ensure that the edges are straight, square and parallel to each other. Time to check the blade for fit in the plane and adjust by more grinding if necessary. You might need to ease the shoulders of the blade for a good fit. Then grind the primary bevel to 25 degrees. I do this on a bench grinder with shop made adjustable rest to get the angle perfect.

If you are using carbon steel, KEEP COOL! Not you, the steel :^) Have a container with water handy and dip very often.

Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Tints and shades


A few swipes on my whetstone to establish the secondary bevel, some polishing with the strop and we are done! I know some likes to use sandpaper for sharpening. Whatever works for you!

Next we'll make the wedge and fine tune our plane. In the meantime, why don't you shave with your new blade tomorrow morning!
It has never crossed my mind that I could make a plane - much less that I should make one. I have used HSS planer blades and I now have a handmade plane on my list! but - - - its a long list! Thanks for the blog!
 

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Registered
Joined
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11,632 Posts
Let's make us an iron!

If this is happening a little too slow for your liking, it is because I have to make sawdust all day long to keep the wolf from the door. That is 10 hours gone. Making these little planes and blogging about it is mostly a night time affair, after taking care of normal daily chores and duties!

We have made a plane body and it is looking pretty good! Time to do some metalwork.
This is what we want to achieve:

Ruler Office ruler Wood Tool Rectangle


At the top is the finished plane iron, below is the material I made it from; an old HSS jointer knife.
There are four dimensions that concern us:
1. Blade width.
2. Blade length.
3. Tang width.
4. Tang length.

BLADE WIDTH.

Rectangle Purple Violet Font Magenta


The blade width needs to be a little wider than the width of our finished plane body. Measure the body width and add a wee bit, say 1/16". It can always be fine tuned later on. In the end the blade needs to stick out just a teeny bit past the edge of the plane on each side.

BLADE LENGTH

Textile Art Magenta Petal Pattern


Blade length is determined by measuring the distance as shown in the photo. It is the length of the exposed ramp or landing that was so carefully flattened when we built the plane body.

TANG WIDTH.

Tie Purple Sleeve Violet Jersey


The width of our tang must be a little less than that of the tenon or opening. Theoretically it can be a sliding fit but then everything must be perfectly square and centre. By making this fit a little loose we get some lateral or sideways adjustment. This will ensure that the blade can be set parallel to the sole with equal amounts protruding past the sides.
The 3mm (1/8") difference as shown in the photo will be too much for a real narrow plane like the one I've made here (5/8"width). I think it would be fine for a larger plane. If in doubt, make it only 1/16th, it is easy to grind more at a later stage if necessary.

TANG LENGTH.

Outerwear Sleeve Collar Font Magenta


Obviously it needs to be long enough to go through the plane! It also needs to stick out past the wedge for ease of adjustment. As always, rather make it longer. Again, it is easy to shorten at a later stage, once you are used to the plane.

Font Blank media Electronic device Circle Data storage device


Once all these dimensions are obtained, mark them out on your blade material. Make sure the tang is centered! The HSS I used is hard stuff and nothing I have in the shop will scratch it for marking. I also couldn't find something that would write on it. I covered it with masking tape for easy marking.
I cut with a 4" slim cutting disc in a baby angle grinder. The beauty of HSS is that you don't have to worry about heat; it doesn't affect the material's properties. If you are working on an old plane blade, cut slowly and cool often with water. You don't want the steel to get hot!

Hood Stairs Wood Fender Automotive tire


Once cut, clean the edges on a disc sander or grinding wheel. Ensure that the edges are straight, square and parallel to each other. Time to check the blade for fit in the plane and adjust by more grinding if necessary. You might need to ease the shoulders of the blade for a good fit. Then grind the primary bevel to 25 degrees. I do this on a bench grinder with shop made adjustable rest to get the angle perfect.

If you are using carbon steel, KEEP COOL! Not you, the steel :^) Have a container with water handy and dip very often.

Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Tints and shades


A few swipes on my whetstone to establish the secondary bevel, some polishing with the strop and we are done! I know some likes to use sandpaper for sharpening. Whatever works for you!

Next we'll make the wedge and fine tune our plane. In the meantime, why don't you shave with your new blade tomorrow morning!
Hey Div, I asked Mads the same question: I'm considering chamfering the edges of my iron. Can you think of a good way to execute this operation? I can't jig it on the wetgrinder, grab it with my Eclipse jig, or figure out a scary sharp method. I'm perplexed. Between the Div and Mads bedding angles, I'm going with 37.5 degrees. I'm curious to see how this pans out!
 

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Discussion Starter · #96 ·
Let's make us an iron!

If this is happening a little too slow for your liking, it is because I have to make sawdust all day long to keep the wolf from the door. That is 10 hours gone. Making these little planes and blogging about it is mostly a night time affair, after taking care of normal daily chores and duties!

We have made a plane body and it is looking pretty good! Time to do some metalwork.
This is what we want to achieve:

Ruler Office ruler Wood Tool Rectangle


At the top is the finished plane iron, below is the material I made it from; an old HSS jointer knife.
There are four dimensions that concern us:
1. Blade width.
2. Blade length.
3. Tang width.
4. Tang length.

BLADE WIDTH.

Rectangle Purple Violet Font Magenta


The blade width needs to be a little wider than the width of our finished plane body. Measure the body width and add a wee bit, say 1/16". It can always be fine tuned later on. In the end the blade needs to stick out just a teeny bit past the edge of the plane on each side.

BLADE LENGTH

Textile Art Magenta Petal Pattern


Blade length is determined by measuring the distance as shown in the photo. It is the length of the exposed ramp or landing that was so carefully flattened when we built the plane body.

TANG WIDTH.

Tie Purple Sleeve Violet Jersey


The width of our tang must be a little less than that of the tenon or opening. Theoretically it can be a sliding fit but then everything must be perfectly square and centre. By making this fit a little loose we get some lateral or sideways adjustment. This will ensure that the blade can be set parallel to the sole with equal amounts protruding past the sides.
The 3mm (1/8") difference as shown in the photo will be too much for a real narrow plane like the one I've made here (5/8"width). I think it would be fine for a larger plane. If in doubt, make it only 1/16th, it is easy to grind more at a later stage if necessary.

TANG LENGTH.

Outerwear Sleeve Collar Font Magenta


Obviously it needs to be long enough to go through the plane! It also needs to stick out past the wedge for ease of adjustment. As always, rather make it longer. Again, it is easy to shorten at a later stage, once you are used to the plane.

Font Blank media Electronic device Circle Data storage device


Once all these dimensions are obtained, mark them out on your blade material. Make sure the tang is centered! The HSS I used is hard stuff and nothing I have in the shop will scratch it for marking. I also couldn't find something that would write on it. I covered it with masking tape for easy marking.
I cut with a 4" slim cutting disc in a baby angle grinder. The beauty of HSS is that you don't have to worry about heat; it doesn't affect the material's properties. If you are working on an old plane blade, cut slowly and cool often with water. You don't want the steel to get hot!

Hood Stairs Wood Fender Automotive tire


Once cut, clean the edges on a disc sander or grinding wheel. Ensure that the edges are straight, square and parallel to each other. Time to check the blade for fit in the plane and adjust by more grinding if necessary. You might need to ease the shoulders of the blade for a good fit. Then grind the primary bevel to 25 degrees. I do this on a bench grinder with shop made adjustable rest to get the angle perfect.

If you are using carbon steel, KEEP COOL! Not you, the steel :^) Have a container with water handy and dip very often.

Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Tints and shades


A few swipes on my whetstone to establish the secondary bevel, some polishing with the strop and we are done! I know some likes to use sandpaper for sharpening. Whatever works for you!

Next we'll make the wedge and fine tune our plane. In the meantime, why don't you shave with your new blade tomorrow morning!
Big Tiny, getting there hey!

Stefang, many ways to skin a cat..

Schieb: Ken, please make one, you'll find it very satisfying. I promise!

Sras, you should try it, nothing like making your own plane and seeing those curls unfold!

Bertha: Al, I would to it on my 8" slow speed bench grinder. I made an adjustable toolrest from timber and use this contraption to grind primary bevels on all my tools. It has a slot cut in it, slightly wider than the grinding wheel and sits real close to the wheel. This toolrest hold the iron at the exact angle I require. It would be easy to grind side bevels with this device. I replaced the crappy grey wheels you sometimes get with these machines with white aluminum oxide ones. I've been using this set up for years. Just can't get myself to justify the cost of a wet grinder system with all its fancy jigs. They cost a fortune down here!

That 37.5 degrees should be great!
 

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Let's make us an iron!

If this is happening a little too slow for your liking, it is because I have to make sawdust all day long to keep the wolf from the door. That is 10 hours gone. Making these little planes and blogging about it is mostly a night time affair, after taking care of normal daily chores and duties!

We have made a plane body and it is looking pretty good! Time to do some metalwork.
This is what we want to achieve:

Ruler Office ruler Wood Tool Rectangle


At the top is the finished plane iron, below is the material I made it from; an old HSS jointer knife.
There are four dimensions that concern us:
1. Blade width.
2. Blade length.
3. Tang width.
4. Tang length.

BLADE WIDTH.

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The blade width needs to be a little wider than the width of our finished plane body. Measure the body width and add a wee bit, say 1/16". It can always be fine tuned later on. In the end the blade needs to stick out just a teeny bit past the edge of the plane on each side.

BLADE LENGTH

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Blade length is determined by measuring the distance as shown in the photo. It is the length of the exposed ramp or landing that was so carefully flattened when we built the plane body.

TANG WIDTH.

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The width of our tang must be a little less than that of the tenon or opening. Theoretically it can be a sliding fit but then everything must be perfectly square and centre. By making this fit a little loose we get some lateral or sideways adjustment. This will ensure that the blade can be set parallel to the sole with equal amounts protruding past the sides.
The 3mm (1/8") difference as shown in the photo will be too much for a real narrow plane like the one I've made here (5/8"width). I think it would be fine for a larger plane. If in doubt, make it only 1/16th, it is easy to grind more at a later stage if necessary.

TANG LENGTH.

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Obviously it needs to be long enough to go through the plane! It also needs to stick out past the wedge for ease of adjustment. As always, rather make it longer. Again, it is easy to shorten at a later stage, once you are used to the plane.

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Once all these dimensions are obtained, mark them out on your blade material. Make sure the tang is centered! The HSS I used is hard stuff and nothing I have in the shop will scratch it for marking. I also couldn't find something that would write on it. I covered it with masking tape for easy marking.
I cut with a 4" slim cutting disc in a baby angle grinder. The beauty of HSS is that you don't have to worry about heat; it doesn't affect the material's properties. If you are working on an old plane blade, cut slowly and cool often with water. You don't want the steel to get hot!

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Once cut, clean the edges on a disc sander or grinding wheel. Ensure that the edges are straight, square and parallel to each other. Time to check the blade for fit in the plane and adjust by more grinding if necessary. You might need to ease the shoulders of the blade for a good fit. Then grind the primary bevel to 25 degrees. I do this on a bench grinder with shop made adjustable rest to get the angle perfect.

If you are using carbon steel, KEEP COOL! Not you, the steel :^) Have a container with water handy and dip very often.

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A few swipes on my whetstone to establish the secondary bevel, some polishing with the strop and we are done! I know some likes to use sandpaper for sharpening. Whatever works for you!

Next we'll make the wedge and fine tune our plane. In the meantime, why don't you shave with your new blade tomorrow morning!
They cost a fortune over here too! I thought I was done when I bought the wet wheel, only to discover the planer blade jig is $173.00! I'm going to modify my el cheapo wetgrinder to do the bevel, then clean it up (hopefully) on the strop. Thanks, Div!
 

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Discussion Starter · #98 ·
Let's wedge it!

It makes me REAL happy to see that some guys have been inspired to make their own planes! For that reason, I will patiently bear the slowness of my backwater farm style dial up connection…..

The last part to be made is the wedge. Just a simple piece of wood but with a very important function! Not only does it hold the blade firmly in position, it also acts as a chip breaker of sorts.

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Remember when we made the plane body (Part II) there was this little off cut piece to be saved? This gives us the exact angle for our wedge. What, you can't find it? Well, all is not lost except a fair amount of fiddling to establish that angle again. The angle of the wedge is important. Look what happens if it is not right:

WEDGE ANGLE TOO HIGH.

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If the wedge angle is too high, there is only contact between the wedge and the plane body at the top of the tenon. Because the blade is now not supported near the mouth, chatter lies ahead! You will not be happy with the performance of your plane!

WEDGE ANGLE TOO LOW.

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If the wedge angle is too low, there is only contact between the wedge and plane body at the bottom of the tenon. This is better than above, at least the blade is supported near the mouth. Since the blade is not supported/wedged all the way it will never be wedged firmly. With a wedge not making full contact, the plane will continuously need adjustment; the blade will keep slipping and won't stay where you want it, especially if you hit a knot or some difficult grain. Better to get that angle just right!

A FEW POINTERS WHEN MAKING THE WEDGE.

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1. If you want, make the wedge from a different contrasting piece of wood. Just be sure you have the grain running length wise.
2. Shape, carve or otherwise embellish the fat end as you feel. The IMPORTANT thing is to have the blade go past the end of the wedge for ease in adjustment.
3. I should have mentioned this earlier. Some roughness on the plane bed/landing is good; it helps to increase friction for holding the blade tightly. Same goes for the wedge. Leave it natural and unfinished for the same reason. Oil only that highly decorative carving that you spent so much time on! (This for Bertha!)

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4. See where the wedge ends? It needs to be some distance back from the mouth. Cut off where required and gently round over the end to help the shavings glide over it.

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5. Here is a little secret that Mads discovered by himself whilst having his coffee, with pipe and tobacco, no doubt! Hollow the bottom face of the wedge very lightly, along the length. This little trick helps greatly in supplying compression in all the right places. We want the wedge to hold the blade firmly, especially near the mouth. THIS IS IMPORTANT! Not having good compression near the mouth is the most common cause of a chattering or badly performing plane!

OK, my wife wants me to watch a DVD with her. I'm already in trouble with the "boss" about spending too much time on LJ's :^( Next, we will fine-tune our plane. Still to come is an installment on properly adjusting the set of the blade. Finally, we will look at ways to turbo charge a wooden shoulder plane! Stay tuned!
 

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Let's wedge it!

It makes me REAL happy to see that some guys have been inspired to make their own planes! For that reason, I will patiently bear the slowness of my backwater farm style dial up connection…..

The last part to be made is the wedge. Just a simple piece of wood but with a very important function! Not only does it hold the blade firmly in position, it also acts as a chip breaker of sorts.

Terrestrial plant Font Rectangle Magenta Fashion accessory


Remember when we made the plane body (Part II) there was this little off cut piece to be saved? This gives us the exact angle for our wedge. What, you can't find it? Well, all is not lost except a fair amount of fiddling to establish that angle again. The angle of the wedge is important. Look what happens if it is not right:

WEDGE ANGLE TOO HIGH.

Wood Purple Terrestrial plant Rectangle Font


If the wedge angle is too high, there is only contact between the wedge and the plane body at the top of the tenon. Because the blade is now not supported near the mouth, chatter lies ahead! You will not be happy with the performance of your plane!

WEDGE ANGLE TOO LOW.

Wood Natural material Terrestrial plant Font Triangle


If the wedge angle is too low, there is only contact between the wedge and plane body at the bottom of the tenon. This is better than above, at least the blade is supported near the mouth. Since the blade is not supported/wedged all the way it will never be wedged firmly. With a wedge not making full contact, the plane will continuously need adjustment; the blade will keep slipping and won't stay where you want it, especially if you hit a knot or some difficult grain. Better to get that angle just right!

A FEW POINTERS WHEN MAKING THE WEDGE.

Purple Wood Sleeve Violet Magenta


1. If you want, make the wedge from a different contrasting piece of wood. Just be sure you have the grain running length wise.
2. Shape, carve or otherwise embellish the fat end as you feel. The IMPORTANT thing is to have the blade go past the end of the wedge for ease in adjustment.
3. I should have mentioned this earlier. Some roughness on the plane bed/landing is good; it helps to increase friction for holding the blade tightly. Same goes for the wedge. Leave it natural and unfinished for the same reason. Oil only that highly decorative carving that you spent so much time on! (This for Bertha!)

Sleeve Wood Font Magenta Tints and shades


4. See where the wedge ends? It needs to be some distance back from the mouth. Cut off where required and gently round over the end to help the shavings glide over it.

Musical instrument Magenta Quill Font Cutlery


5. Here is a little secret that Mads discovered by himself whilst having his coffee, with pipe and tobacco, no doubt! Hollow the bottom face of the wedge very lightly, along the length. This little trick helps greatly in supplying compression in all the right places. We want the wedge to hold the blade firmly, especially near the mouth. THIS IS IMPORTANT! Not having good compression near the mouth is the most common cause of a chattering or badly performing plane!

OK, my wife wants me to watch a DVD with her. I'm already in trouble with the "boss" about spending too much time on LJ's :^( Next, we will fine-tune our plane. Still to come is an installment on properly adjusting the set of the blade. Finally, we will look at ways to turbo charge a wooden shoulder plane! Stay tuned!
Hi my dear Div.
Thank you for another wonderful and informative blog in this inspireing series (100 times better than watching tv). Mathilde (my daughter) and I watced slumdog millionaire tonight and that was a wonderful movie though.
And after saying goodnight to you now I will go and see the movie Beautiful, that I have been looking forward to see for a while.
In my country we say 'need learns the nakid woman to spun', so yes I figured out the hollowing of the wedge.
The very best of my thoughts,
Send my love to M and say I look at Caroline every day now with a smile thanks to her.
Mads
 

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Let's wedge it!

It makes me REAL happy to see that some guys have been inspired to make their own planes! For that reason, I will patiently bear the slowness of my backwater farm style dial up connection…..

The last part to be made is the wedge. Just a simple piece of wood but with a very important function! Not only does it hold the blade firmly in position, it also acts as a chip breaker of sorts.

Terrestrial plant Font Rectangle Magenta Fashion accessory


Remember when we made the plane body (Part II) there was this little off cut piece to be saved? This gives us the exact angle for our wedge. What, you can't find it? Well, all is not lost except a fair amount of fiddling to establish that angle again. The angle of the wedge is important. Look what happens if it is not right:

WEDGE ANGLE TOO HIGH.

Wood Purple Terrestrial plant Rectangle Font


If the wedge angle is too high, there is only contact between the wedge and the plane body at the top of the tenon. Because the blade is now not supported near the mouth, chatter lies ahead! You will not be happy with the performance of your plane!

WEDGE ANGLE TOO LOW.

Wood Natural material Terrestrial plant Font Triangle


If the wedge angle is too low, there is only contact between the wedge and plane body at the bottom of the tenon. This is better than above, at least the blade is supported near the mouth. Since the blade is not supported/wedged all the way it will never be wedged firmly. With a wedge not making full contact, the plane will continuously need adjustment; the blade will keep slipping and won't stay where you want it, especially if you hit a knot or some difficult grain. Better to get that angle just right!

A FEW POINTERS WHEN MAKING THE WEDGE.

Purple Wood Sleeve Violet Magenta


1. If you want, make the wedge from a different contrasting piece of wood. Just be sure you have the grain running length wise.
2. Shape, carve or otherwise embellish the fat end as you feel. The IMPORTANT thing is to have the blade go past the end of the wedge for ease in adjustment.
3. I should have mentioned this earlier. Some roughness on the plane bed/landing is good; it helps to increase friction for holding the blade tightly. Same goes for the wedge. Leave it natural and unfinished for the same reason. Oil only that highly decorative carving that you spent so much time on! (This for Bertha!)

Sleeve Wood Font Magenta Tints and shades


4. See where the wedge ends? It needs to be some distance back from the mouth. Cut off where required and gently round over the end to help the shavings glide over it.

Musical instrument Magenta Quill Font Cutlery


5. Here is a little secret that Mads discovered by himself whilst having his coffee, with pipe and tobacco, no doubt! Hollow the bottom face of the wedge very lightly, along the length. This little trick helps greatly in supplying compression in all the right places. We want the wedge to hold the blade firmly, especially near the mouth. THIS IS IMPORTANT! Not having good compression near the mouth is the most common cause of a chattering or badly performing plane!

OK, my wife wants me to watch a DVD with her. I'm already in trouble with the "boss" about spending too much time on LJ's :^( Next, we will fine-tune our plane. Still to come is an installment on properly adjusting the set of the blade. Finally, we will look at ways to turbo charge a wooden shoulder plane! Stay tuned!
Thanks for all your instructions and I will be making one soon.

Erwin, Jacksonville, FL
 

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