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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Introduction

I've recently begun to move on with building a traditional wooden yacht tender. Boatbuilding has always been fascinating to me as a type of woodworking and I'd like a new boat for next year. This is mostly a learn as I go project. I'd like to connect with others that are interested with boatbuilding (and could maybe offer me some guidance too)

Selecting a boat

Before choosing a plan, my basic requirements were that it would be built traditional wooden lapstrake construction, a good rower, option to upgrade with a sail, stable for kids, able to mount a small outboard motor, light enough to transport on a car top (maybe), and small enough so I could build it in my shop instead of the cold garage.

There are hundreds, if not thousands, of small boat plans available in books and online. Eventually, I decided on the Sunshine Yacht Tender from Duck Trap Woodworking. This seemed to fit all of my requirements and I could order a decent set of plans along with a book on how to build it. There's a nice history to this boat going back to the early 1900s in Maine. Home builders and professionals still build and sell this model.



Project Summary:

Expenses so far: $60 for (a very nice) set of plans and plan book
Several books borrowed from library
 

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13,760 Posts
Introduction

I've recently begun to move on with building a traditional wooden yacht tender. Boatbuilding has always been fascinating to me as a type of woodworking and I'd like a new boat for next year. This is mostly a learn as I go project. I'd like to connect with others that are interested with boatbuilding (and could maybe offer me some guidance too)

Selecting a boat

Before choosing a plan, my basic requirements were that it would be built traditional wooden lapstrake construction, a good rower, option to upgrade with a sail, stable for kids, able to mount a small outboard motor, light enough to transport on a car top (maybe), and small enough so I could build it in my shop instead of the cold garage.

There are hundreds, if not thousands, of small boat plans available in books and online. Eventually, I decided on the Sunshine Yacht Tender from Duck Trap Woodworking. This seemed to fit all of my requirements and I could order a decent set of plans along with a book on how to build it. There's a nice history to this boat going back to the early 1900s in Maine. Home builders and professionals still build and sell this model.



Project Summary:

Expenses so far: $60 for (a very nice) set of plans and plan book
Several books borrowed from library
i built boats for 10 years in ft. lauderdale , to learn the craft .
it will definitly improve your wood working skills .
as a project , it is a real pleasure . just take your time and you will understand and accomplish allot .
dont try and rush it , as mistakes can be hard to fix .
looks like a nice choice !
enjoy .
 

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Introduction

I've recently begun to move on with building a traditional wooden yacht tender. Boatbuilding has always been fascinating to me as a type of woodworking and I'd like a new boat for next year. This is mostly a learn as I go project. I'd like to connect with others that are interested with boatbuilding (and could maybe offer me some guidance too)

Selecting a boat

Before choosing a plan, my basic requirements were that it would be built traditional wooden lapstrake construction, a good rower, option to upgrade with a sail, stable for kids, able to mount a small outboard motor, light enough to transport on a car top (maybe), and small enough so I could build it in my shop instead of the cold garage.

There are hundreds, if not thousands, of small boat plans available in books and online. Eventually, I decided on the Sunshine Yacht Tender from Duck Trap Woodworking. This seemed to fit all of my requirements and I could order a decent set of plans along with a book on how to build it. There's a nice history to this boat going back to the early 1900s in Maine. Home builders and professionals still build and sell this model.



Project Summary:

Expenses so far: $60 for (a very nice) set of plans and plan book
Several books borrowed from library
I am really looking forward to following your progress. Best of luck!
 

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35,383 Posts
Introduction

I've recently begun to move on with building a traditional wooden yacht tender. Boatbuilding has always been fascinating to me as a type of woodworking and I'd like a new boat for next year. This is mostly a learn as I go project. I'd like to connect with others that are interested with boatbuilding (and could maybe offer me some guidance too)

Selecting a boat

Before choosing a plan, my basic requirements were that it would be built traditional wooden lapstrake construction, a good rower, option to upgrade with a sail, stable for kids, able to mount a small outboard motor, light enough to transport on a car top (maybe), and small enough so I could build it in my shop instead of the cold garage.

There are hundreds, if not thousands, of small boat plans available in books and online. Eventually, I decided on the Sunshine Yacht Tender from Duck Trap Woodworking. This seemed to fit all of my requirements and I could order a decent set of plans along with a book on how to build it. There's a nice history to this boat going back to the early 1900s in Maine. Home builders and professionals still build and sell this model.



Project Summary:

Expenses so far: $60 for (a very nice) set of plans and plan book
Several books borrowed from library
Good luck. At the St. Michaels Maritime Museum in Maryland. the have a weekend group that makes a wooden boat. You pay for the privileged. You might check around and see if anyone has a class similar.

Here is my blog on the program
 

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Introduction

I've recently begun to move on with building a traditional wooden yacht tender. Boatbuilding has always been fascinating to me as a type of woodworking and I'd like a new boat for next year. This is mostly a learn as I go project. I'd like to connect with others that are interested with boatbuilding (and could maybe offer me some guidance too)

Selecting a boat

Before choosing a plan, my basic requirements were that it would be built traditional wooden lapstrake construction, a good rower, option to upgrade with a sail, stable for kids, able to mount a small outboard motor, light enough to transport on a car top (maybe), and small enough so I could build it in my shop instead of the cold garage.

There are hundreds, if not thousands, of small boat plans available in books and online. Eventually, I decided on the Sunshine Yacht Tender from Duck Trap Woodworking. This seemed to fit all of my requirements and I could order a decent set of plans along with a book on how to build it. There's a nice history to this boat going back to the early 1900s in Maine. Home builders and professionals still build and sell this model.



Project Summary:

Expenses so far: $60 for (a very nice) set of plans and plan book
Several books borrowed from library
Sound like fun bring it on.
 

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23,074 Posts
Introduction

I've recently begun to move on with building a traditional wooden yacht tender. Boatbuilding has always been fascinating to me as a type of woodworking and I'd like a new boat for next year. This is mostly a learn as I go project. I'd like to connect with others that are interested with boatbuilding (and could maybe offer me some guidance too)

Selecting a boat

Before choosing a plan, my basic requirements were that it would be built traditional wooden lapstrake construction, a good rower, option to upgrade with a sail, stable for kids, able to mount a small outboard motor, light enough to transport on a car top (maybe), and small enough so I could build it in my shop instead of the cold garage.

There are hundreds, if not thousands, of small boat plans available in books and online. Eventually, I decided on the Sunshine Yacht Tender from Duck Trap Woodworking. This seemed to fit all of my requirements and I could order a decent set of plans along with a book on how to build it. There's a nice history to this boat going back to the early 1900s in Maine. Home builders and professionals still build and sell this model.



Project Summary:

Expenses so far: $60 for (a very nice) set of plans and plan book
Several books borrowed from library
Now this is my territory…....keep me posted on this Matt….good choice of boat….looks like a small Wherry.
 

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Introduction

I've recently begun to move on with building a traditional wooden yacht tender. Boatbuilding has always been fascinating to me as a type of woodworking and I'd like a new boat for next year. This is mostly a learn as I go project. I'd like to connect with others that are interested with boatbuilding (and could maybe offer me some guidance too)

Selecting a boat

Before choosing a plan, my basic requirements were that it would be built traditional wooden lapstrake construction, a good rower, option to upgrade with a sail, stable for kids, able to mount a small outboard motor, light enough to transport on a car top (maybe), and small enough so I could build it in my shop instead of the cold garage.

There are hundreds, if not thousands, of small boat plans available in books and online. Eventually, I decided on the Sunshine Yacht Tender from Duck Trap Woodworking. This seemed to fit all of my requirements and I could order a decent set of plans along with a book on how to build it. There's a nice history to this boat going back to the early 1900s in Maine. Home builders and professionals still build and sell this model.



Project Summary:

Expenses so far: $60 for (a very nice) set of plans and plan book
Several books borrowed from library
sooooo glad i ran across your blog series…SOME day…i want to build a little sail boat I can run up and down the napa river…and when i read your intro and what you called your basic requirements I can almost check all those off as what I am looking for…

SUPER GOOD LUCK…now to catch up with your newer blogs!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Lofting

After about 12 hours of work, nearly all lofting is complete and I can finally start some construction! The famous boat builder and author, Howard I. Chapelle wrote in his aptly named book "Boatbuilding" - "There was never a boat built in which too much lofting had been done". By lofting, Mr. Chapelle is referring to the laying out of the lines and drawing of construction details to full scale, a tedious practice he writes "avoids much trying and fitting".

Setting up the lofting area

To begin, I cut up a 4×8 sheet of 3/4 plywood to create a lofting "table" that is 12'x32". This is large enough to draw all 3 plan views (sheer, body and half-breadth) which are drawn over each other. After leveling the table, I rolled out red rosin paper, an option some builders use to draw the plans on instead of drawing right onto the plywood (or traditionally.. the floor of a loft). I then layed out the all important "base line" and tacked a straight edge on that line from which measurements would be made. A large grid is then drawn over the entire area to indicate vertical stations and horizontal waterlines.



Drawing the Profile and Half-Breath view

There are virtually no straight lines on this boat. I was immediately faced with the problem of how to correctly draw long curved lines. An ideal curved line is a fair curve - one which has a smooth continuous flow to it. It turns out to be relatively simple to do, but does require a good eye. The process essentially involves the use of long wooden battens of straight grain and clear of knots. To create the curve, you "loosely" bend the batten around nails which are tacked onto the "grid" according to measurements in the plans. It's basically "connect the dots". The boat plans includes a table of offsets which have measurements for where you place your marks. Once the curve looks fair, you draw the curved line against the batten with a pencil, remove the batten and do the same thing for the next line until you have something that looks like a boat. The following photos show the line for the profile sheer (top edge viewed from side) and a waterline (water level at 6 inches viewed from top). Notice how two different views of the boat are drawn in the same space.



Drawing the Body Plan

The body plan is the head on view of the boat and is drawn right over the other 2 plan views that were previously drawn. The measurements are taken from the lofted lines in the previous 2 plan views and the batten is used again to "connect the dots" and draw curved lines for the body plan sections. The body plan shows 7 cross sections of the hull from front to back (stern to transom) with the 5 equally spaced stations in between. The layout of each station are the templates for the actual station molds which will be used later to form the hull. The photos below show the shapes of the hull from head on. The reason for the white paper overlay is to show the construction detail of how the hull planking will join to the keelson and keel on the bottom of the boat. Because there are 7 body sections all overlapping in the same space on the plans, separate pieces of paper are tacked in place as needed for each section so that the details are not a hopeless mess of overlapping lines.



Final Results Example

The following is an example of a different boat showing the 3 plan views. In the actual lofting, these views are drawn right over each other.



Lessons Learned
I'm not crazy about the red rosin paper. It has small wrinkles in it that slightly distort the lines. It's not enough to throw off any measurements by anything more than 1/64th probably, but it's not ideal. Next time, I'd whitewash the plywood and draw onto that directly.

Lofting Materials List:

  • Red Rosin Paper, Home Depot, $12
  • 3/4 Plywood 4×8, Lowes, $23.88
  • 1×4x12 clear pine, Home Depot, $12

Project Materials Summary:

  • Plans and Book: $60
  • Lofting Supplies: $47.88

- Total Project Expenses so far: $107.88

Labor Hours Summary:

  • 5/29/09 - 6/8/09: Lofting - 12 Hours

- Total Project Labor Hours so far: 12 Hours
 

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Lofting

After about 12 hours of work, nearly all lofting is complete and I can finally start some construction! The famous boat builder and author, Howard I. Chapelle wrote in his aptly named book "Boatbuilding" - "There was never a boat built in which too much lofting had been done". By lofting, Mr. Chapelle is referring to the laying out of the lines and drawing of construction details to full scale, a tedious practice he writes "avoids much trying and fitting".

Setting up the lofting area

To begin, I cut up a 4×8 sheet of 3/4 plywood to create a lofting "table" that is 12'x32". This is large enough to draw all 3 plan views (sheer, body and half-breadth) which are drawn over each other. After leveling the table, I rolled out red rosin paper, an option some builders use to draw the plans on instead of drawing right onto the plywood (or traditionally.. the floor of a loft). I then layed out the all important "base line" and tacked a straight edge on that line from which measurements would be made. A large grid is then drawn over the entire area to indicate vertical stations and horizontal waterlines.



Drawing the Profile and Half-Breath view

There are virtually no straight lines on this boat. I was immediately faced with the problem of how to correctly draw long curved lines. An ideal curved line is a fair curve - one which has a smooth continuous flow to it. It turns out to be relatively simple to do, but does require a good eye. The process essentially involves the use of long wooden battens of straight grain and clear of knots. To create the curve, you "loosely" bend the batten around nails which are tacked onto the "grid" according to measurements in the plans. It's basically "connect the dots". The boat plans includes a table of offsets which have measurements for where you place your marks. Once the curve looks fair, you draw the curved line against the batten with a pencil, remove the batten and do the same thing for the next line until you have something that looks like a boat. The following photos show the line for the profile sheer (top edge viewed from side) and a waterline (water level at 6 inches viewed from top). Notice how two different views of the boat are drawn in the same space.



Drawing the Body Plan

The body plan is the head on view of the boat and is drawn right over the other 2 plan views that were previously drawn. The measurements are taken from the lofted lines in the previous 2 plan views and the batten is used again to "connect the dots" and draw curved lines for the body plan sections. The body plan shows 7 cross sections of the hull from front to back (stern to transom) with the 5 equally spaced stations in between. The layout of each station are the templates for the actual station molds which will be used later to form the hull. The photos below show the shapes of the hull from head on. The reason for the white paper overlay is to show the construction detail of how the hull planking will join to the keelson and keel on the bottom of the boat. Because there are 7 body sections all overlapping in the same space on the plans, separate pieces of paper are tacked in place as needed for each section so that the details are not a hopeless mess of overlapping lines.



Final Results Example

The following is an example of a different boat showing the 3 plan views. In the actual lofting, these views are drawn right over each other.



Lessons Learned
I'm not crazy about the red rosin paper. It has small wrinkles in it that slightly distort the lines. It's not enough to throw off any measurements by anything more than 1/64th probably, but it's not ideal. Next time, I'd whitewash the plywood and draw onto that directly.

Lofting Materials List:

  • Red Rosin Paper, Home Depot, $12
  • 3/4 Plywood 4×8, Lowes, $23.88
  • 1×4x12 clear pine, Home Depot, $12

Project Materials Summary:

  • Plans and Book: $60
  • Lofting Supplies: $47.88

- Total Project Expenses so far: $107.88

Labor Hours Summary:

  • 5/29/09 - 6/8/09: Lofting - 12 Hours

- Total Project Labor Hours so far: 12 Hours
i built boats for 10 years in fla. i t is a very learning experience , and rewarding !
draw every fastener also , as they can weaken or cross each other in placement .
it,s worth the time to get the lofting right , as it saves time and money (and hair ! ) .
good luck to you , and keep us posted .
i know many l.j.s. are going to be thrilled to see this come to life .!
 

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Lofting

After about 12 hours of work, nearly all lofting is complete and I can finally start some construction! The famous boat builder and author, Howard I. Chapelle wrote in his aptly named book "Boatbuilding" - "There was never a boat built in which too much lofting had been done". By lofting, Mr. Chapelle is referring to the laying out of the lines and drawing of construction details to full scale, a tedious practice he writes "avoids much trying and fitting".

Setting up the lofting area

To begin, I cut up a 4×8 sheet of 3/4 plywood to create a lofting "table" that is 12'x32". This is large enough to draw all 3 plan views (sheer, body and half-breadth) which are drawn over each other. After leveling the table, I rolled out red rosin paper, an option some builders use to draw the plans on instead of drawing right onto the plywood (or traditionally.. the floor of a loft). I then layed out the all important "base line" and tacked a straight edge on that line from which measurements would be made. A large grid is then drawn over the entire area to indicate vertical stations and horizontal waterlines.



Drawing the Profile and Half-Breath view

There are virtually no straight lines on this boat. I was immediately faced with the problem of how to correctly draw long curved lines. An ideal curved line is a fair curve - one which has a smooth continuous flow to it. It turns out to be relatively simple to do, but does require a good eye. The process essentially involves the use of long wooden battens of straight grain and clear of knots. To create the curve, you "loosely" bend the batten around nails which are tacked onto the "grid" according to measurements in the plans. It's basically "connect the dots". The boat plans includes a table of offsets which have measurements for where you place your marks. Once the curve looks fair, you draw the curved line against the batten with a pencil, remove the batten and do the same thing for the next line until you have something that looks like a boat. The following photos show the line for the profile sheer (top edge viewed from side) and a waterline (water level at 6 inches viewed from top). Notice how two different views of the boat are drawn in the same space.



Drawing the Body Plan

The body plan is the head on view of the boat and is drawn right over the other 2 plan views that were previously drawn. The measurements are taken from the lofted lines in the previous 2 plan views and the batten is used again to "connect the dots" and draw curved lines for the body plan sections. The body plan shows 7 cross sections of the hull from front to back (stern to transom) with the 5 equally spaced stations in between. The layout of each station are the templates for the actual station molds which will be used later to form the hull. The photos below show the shapes of the hull from head on. The reason for the white paper overlay is to show the construction detail of how the hull planking will join to the keelson and keel on the bottom of the boat. Because there are 7 body sections all overlapping in the same space on the plans, separate pieces of paper are tacked in place as needed for each section so that the details are not a hopeless mess of overlapping lines.



Final Results Example

The following is an example of a different boat showing the 3 plan views. In the actual lofting, these views are drawn right over each other.



Lessons Learned
I'm not crazy about the red rosin paper. It has small wrinkles in it that slightly distort the lines. It's not enough to throw off any measurements by anything more than 1/64th probably, but it's not ideal. Next time, I'd whitewash the plywood and draw onto that directly.

Lofting Materials List:

  • Red Rosin Paper, Home Depot, $12
  • 3/4 Plywood 4×8, Lowes, $23.88
  • 1×4x12 clear pine, Home Depot, $12

Project Materials Summary:

  • Plans and Book: $60
  • Lofting Supplies: $47.88

- Total Project Expenses so far: $107.88

Labor Hours Summary:

  • 5/29/09 - 6/8/09: Lofting - 12 Hours

- Total Project Labor Hours so far: 12 Hours
Sheeh!! I thought all you had to do was throw down a keel, nail on the ribs and plank it:)) Looks like there is a bit more to it than I thought, eh?
 

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Lofting

After about 12 hours of work, nearly all lofting is complete and I can finally start some construction! The famous boat builder and author, Howard I. Chapelle wrote in his aptly named book "Boatbuilding" - "There was never a boat built in which too much lofting had been done". By lofting, Mr. Chapelle is referring to the laying out of the lines and drawing of construction details to full scale, a tedious practice he writes "avoids much trying and fitting".

Setting up the lofting area

To begin, I cut up a 4×8 sheet of 3/4 plywood to create a lofting "table" that is 12'x32". This is large enough to draw all 3 plan views (sheer, body and half-breadth) which are drawn over each other. After leveling the table, I rolled out red rosin paper, an option some builders use to draw the plans on instead of drawing right onto the plywood (or traditionally.. the floor of a loft). I then layed out the all important "base line" and tacked a straight edge on that line from which measurements would be made. A large grid is then drawn over the entire area to indicate vertical stations and horizontal waterlines.



Drawing the Profile and Half-Breath view

There are virtually no straight lines on this boat. I was immediately faced with the problem of how to correctly draw long curved lines. An ideal curved line is a fair curve - one which has a smooth continuous flow to it. It turns out to be relatively simple to do, but does require a good eye. The process essentially involves the use of long wooden battens of straight grain and clear of knots. To create the curve, you "loosely" bend the batten around nails which are tacked onto the "grid" according to measurements in the plans. It's basically "connect the dots". The boat plans includes a table of offsets which have measurements for where you place your marks. Once the curve looks fair, you draw the curved line against the batten with a pencil, remove the batten and do the same thing for the next line until you have something that looks like a boat. The following photos show the line for the profile sheer (top edge viewed from side) and a waterline (water level at 6 inches viewed from top). Notice how two different views of the boat are drawn in the same space.



Drawing the Body Plan

The body plan is the head on view of the boat and is drawn right over the other 2 plan views that were previously drawn. The measurements are taken from the lofted lines in the previous 2 plan views and the batten is used again to "connect the dots" and draw curved lines for the body plan sections. The body plan shows 7 cross sections of the hull from front to back (stern to transom) with the 5 equally spaced stations in between. The layout of each station are the templates for the actual station molds which will be used later to form the hull. The photos below show the shapes of the hull from head on. The reason for the white paper overlay is to show the construction detail of how the hull planking will join to the keelson and keel on the bottom of the boat. Because there are 7 body sections all overlapping in the same space on the plans, separate pieces of paper are tacked in place as needed for each section so that the details are not a hopeless mess of overlapping lines.



Final Results Example

The following is an example of a different boat showing the 3 plan views. In the actual lofting, these views are drawn right over each other.



Lessons Learned
I'm not crazy about the red rosin paper. It has small wrinkles in it that slightly distort the lines. It's not enough to throw off any measurements by anything more than 1/64th probably, but it's not ideal. Next time, I'd whitewash the plywood and draw onto that directly.

Lofting Materials List:

  • Red Rosin Paper, Home Depot, $12
  • 3/4 Plywood 4×8, Lowes, $23.88
  • 1×4x12 clear pine, Home Depot, $12

Project Materials Summary:

  • Plans and Book: $60
  • Lofting Supplies: $47.88

- Total Project Expenses so far: $107.88

Labor Hours Summary:

  • 5/29/09 - 6/8/09: Lofting - 12 Hours

- Total Project Labor Hours so far: 12 Hours
This will be fun to follow. I'm never going to build a boat, but I buy Wooden Boat magazine and love the stories about builds and sailing adventures. I used to run a lot of wooden boats in the Navy including the Captain's gig. I really miss the fun. Unfortunately my wife isn't fond of the water, so I am now an armchair sailor. Looking forward to the build!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Lofting

After about 12 hours of work, nearly all lofting is complete and I can finally start some construction! The famous boat builder and author, Howard I. Chapelle wrote in his aptly named book "Boatbuilding" - "There was never a boat built in which too much lofting had been done". By lofting, Mr. Chapelle is referring to the laying out of the lines and drawing of construction details to full scale, a tedious practice he writes "avoids much trying and fitting".

Setting up the lofting area

To begin, I cut up a 4×8 sheet of 3/4 plywood to create a lofting "table" that is 12'x32". This is large enough to draw all 3 plan views (sheer, body and half-breadth) which are drawn over each other. After leveling the table, I rolled out red rosin paper, an option some builders use to draw the plans on instead of drawing right onto the plywood (or traditionally.. the floor of a loft). I then layed out the all important "base line" and tacked a straight edge on that line from which measurements would be made. A large grid is then drawn over the entire area to indicate vertical stations and horizontal waterlines.



Drawing the Profile and Half-Breath view

There are virtually no straight lines on this boat. I was immediately faced with the problem of how to correctly draw long curved lines. An ideal curved line is a fair curve - one which has a smooth continuous flow to it. It turns out to be relatively simple to do, but does require a good eye. The process essentially involves the use of long wooden battens of straight grain and clear of knots. To create the curve, you "loosely" bend the batten around nails which are tacked onto the "grid" according to measurements in the plans. It's basically "connect the dots". The boat plans includes a table of offsets which have measurements for where you place your marks. Once the curve looks fair, you draw the curved line against the batten with a pencil, remove the batten and do the same thing for the next line until you have something that looks like a boat. The following photos show the line for the profile sheer (top edge viewed from side) and a waterline (water level at 6 inches viewed from top). Notice how two different views of the boat are drawn in the same space.



Drawing the Body Plan

The body plan is the head on view of the boat and is drawn right over the other 2 plan views that were previously drawn. The measurements are taken from the lofted lines in the previous 2 plan views and the batten is used again to "connect the dots" and draw curved lines for the body plan sections. The body plan shows 7 cross sections of the hull from front to back (stern to transom) with the 5 equally spaced stations in between. The layout of each station are the templates for the actual station molds which will be used later to form the hull. The photos below show the shapes of the hull from head on. The reason for the white paper overlay is to show the construction detail of how the hull planking will join to the keelson and keel on the bottom of the boat. Because there are 7 body sections all overlapping in the same space on the plans, separate pieces of paper are tacked in place as needed for each section so that the details are not a hopeless mess of overlapping lines.



Final Results Example

The following is an example of a different boat showing the 3 plan views. In the actual lofting, these views are drawn right over each other.



Lessons Learned
I'm not crazy about the red rosin paper. It has small wrinkles in it that slightly distort the lines. It's not enough to throw off any measurements by anything more than 1/64th probably, but it's not ideal. Next time, I'd whitewash the plywood and draw onto that directly.

Lofting Materials List:

  • Red Rosin Paper, Home Depot, $12
  • 3/4 Plywood 4×8, Lowes, $23.88
  • 1×4x12 clear pine, Home Depot, $12

Project Materials Summary:

  • Plans and Book: $60
  • Lofting Supplies: $47.88

- Total Project Expenses so far: $107.88

Labor Hours Summary:

  • 5/29/09 - 6/8/09: Lofting - 12 Hours

- Total Project Labor Hours so far: 12 Hours
Thanks everyone for the tips and encouragement.
 

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Lofting

After about 12 hours of work, nearly all lofting is complete and I can finally start some construction! The famous boat builder and author, Howard I. Chapelle wrote in his aptly named book "Boatbuilding" - "There was never a boat built in which too much lofting had been done". By lofting, Mr. Chapelle is referring to the laying out of the lines and drawing of construction details to full scale, a tedious practice he writes "avoids much trying and fitting".

Setting up the lofting area

To begin, I cut up a 4×8 sheet of 3/4 plywood to create a lofting "table" that is 12'x32". This is large enough to draw all 3 plan views (sheer, body and half-breadth) which are drawn over each other. After leveling the table, I rolled out red rosin paper, an option some builders use to draw the plans on instead of drawing right onto the plywood (or traditionally.. the floor of a loft). I then layed out the all important "base line" and tacked a straight edge on that line from which measurements would be made. A large grid is then drawn over the entire area to indicate vertical stations and horizontal waterlines.



Drawing the Profile and Half-Breath view

There are virtually no straight lines on this boat. I was immediately faced with the problem of how to correctly draw long curved lines. An ideal curved line is a fair curve - one which has a smooth continuous flow to it. It turns out to be relatively simple to do, but does require a good eye. The process essentially involves the use of long wooden battens of straight grain and clear of knots. To create the curve, you "loosely" bend the batten around nails which are tacked onto the "grid" according to measurements in the plans. It's basically "connect the dots". The boat plans includes a table of offsets which have measurements for where you place your marks. Once the curve looks fair, you draw the curved line against the batten with a pencil, remove the batten and do the same thing for the next line until you have something that looks like a boat. The following photos show the line for the profile sheer (top edge viewed from side) and a waterline (water level at 6 inches viewed from top). Notice how two different views of the boat are drawn in the same space.



Drawing the Body Plan

The body plan is the head on view of the boat and is drawn right over the other 2 plan views that were previously drawn. The measurements are taken from the lofted lines in the previous 2 plan views and the batten is used again to "connect the dots" and draw curved lines for the body plan sections. The body plan shows 7 cross sections of the hull from front to back (stern to transom) with the 5 equally spaced stations in between. The layout of each station are the templates for the actual station molds which will be used later to form the hull. The photos below show the shapes of the hull from head on. The reason for the white paper overlay is to show the construction detail of how the hull planking will join to the keelson and keel on the bottom of the boat. Because there are 7 body sections all overlapping in the same space on the plans, separate pieces of paper are tacked in place as needed for each section so that the details are not a hopeless mess of overlapping lines.



Final Results Example

The following is an example of a different boat showing the 3 plan views. In the actual lofting, these views are drawn right over each other.



Lessons Learned
I'm not crazy about the red rosin paper. It has small wrinkles in it that slightly distort the lines. It's not enough to throw off any measurements by anything more than 1/64th probably, but it's not ideal. Next time, I'd whitewash the plywood and draw onto that directly.

Lofting Materials List:

  • Red Rosin Paper, Home Depot, $12
  • 3/4 Plywood 4×8, Lowes, $23.88
  • 1×4x12 clear pine, Home Depot, $12

Project Materials Summary:

  • Plans and Book: $60
  • Lofting Supplies: $47.88

- Total Project Expenses so far: $107.88

Labor Hours Summary:

  • 5/29/09 - 6/8/09: Lofting - 12 Hours

- Total Project Labor Hours so far: 12 Hours
Very interesting a all new project for me. I'm anxious to see more. Thanks for sharing
 

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Lofting

After about 12 hours of work, nearly all lofting is complete and I can finally start some construction! The famous boat builder and author, Howard I. Chapelle wrote in his aptly named book "Boatbuilding" - "There was never a boat built in which too much lofting had been done". By lofting, Mr. Chapelle is referring to the laying out of the lines and drawing of construction details to full scale, a tedious practice he writes "avoids much trying and fitting".

Setting up the lofting area

To begin, I cut up a 4×8 sheet of 3/4 plywood to create a lofting "table" that is 12'x32". This is large enough to draw all 3 plan views (sheer, body and half-breadth) which are drawn over each other. After leveling the table, I rolled out red rosin paper, an option some builders use to draw the plans on instead of drawing right onto the plywood (or traditionally.. the floor of a loft). I then layed out the all important "base line" and tacked a straight edge on that line from which measurements would be made. A large grid is then drawn over the entire area to indicate vertical stations and horizontal waterlines.



Drawing the Profile and Half-Breath view

There are virtually no straight lines on this boat. I was immediately faced with the problem of how to correctly draw long curved lines. An ideal curved line is a fair curve - one which has a smooth continuous flow to it. It turns out to be relatively simple to do, but does require a good eye. The process essentially involves the use of long wooden battens of straight grain and clear of knots. To create the curve, you "loosely" bend the batten around nails which are tacked onto the "grid" according to measurements in the plans. It's basically "connect the dots". The boat plans includes a table of offsets which have measurements for where you place your marks. Once the curve looks fair, you draw the curved line against the batten with a pencil, remove the batten and do the same thing for the next line until you have something that looks like a boat. The following photos show the line for the profile sheer (top edge viewed from side) and a waterline (water level at 6 inches viewed from top). Notice how two different views of the boat are drawn in the same space.



Drawing the Body Plan

The body plan is the head on view of the boat and is drawn right over the other 2 plan views that were previously drawn. The measurements are taken from the lofted lines in the previous 2 plan views and the batten is used again to "connect the dots" and draw curved lines for the body plan sections. The body plan shows 7 cross sections of the hull from front to back (stern to transom) with the 5 equally spaced stations in between. The layout of each station are the templates for the actual station molds which will be used later to form the hull. The photos below show the shapes of the hull from head on. The reason for the white paper overlay is to show the construction detail of how the hull planking will join to the keelson and keel on the bottom of the boat. Because there are 7 body sections all overlapping in the same space on the plans, separate pieces of paper are tacked in place as needed for each section so that the details are not a hopeless mess of overlapping lines.



Final Results Example

The following is an example of a different boat showing the 3 plan views. In the actual lofting, these views are drawn right over each other.



Lessons Learned
I'm not crazy about the red rosin paper. It has small wrinkles in it that slightly distort the lines. It's not enough to throw off any measurements by anything more than 1/64th probably, but it's not ideal. Next time, I'd whitewash the plywood and draw onto that directly.

Lofting Materials List:

  • Red Rosin Paper, Home Depot, $12
  • 3/4 Plywood 4×8, Lowes, $23.88
  • 1×4x12 clear pine, Home Depot, $12

Project Materials Summary:

  • Plans and Book: $60
  • Lofting Supplies: $47.88

- Total Project Expenses so far: $107.88

Labor Hours Summary:

  • 5/29/09 - 6/8/09: Lofting - 12 Hours

- Total Project Labor Hours so far: 12 Hours
I have already learned a lot, too! Thanks for writing about your experience.
 

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Lofting

After about 12 hours of work, nearly all lofting is complete and I can finally start some construction! The famous boat builder and author, Howard I. Chapelle wrote in his aptly named book "Boatbuilding" - "There was never a boat built in which too much lofting had been done". By lofting, Mr. Chapelle is referring to the laying out of the lines and drawing of construction details to full scale, a tedious practice he writes "avoids much trying and fitting".

Setting up the lofting area

To begin, I cut up a 4×8 sheet of 3/4 plywood to create a lofting "table" that is 12'x32". This is large enough to draw all 3 plan views (sheer, body and half-breadth) which are drawn over each other. After leveling the table, I rolled out red rosin paper, an option some builders use to draw the plans on instead of drawing right onto the plywood (or traditionally.. the floor of a loft). I then layed out the all important "base line" and tacked a straight edge on that line from which measurements would be made. A large grid is then drawn over the entire area to indicate vertical stations and horizontal waterlines.



Drawing the Profile and Half-Breath view

There are virtually no straight lines on this boat. I was immediately faced with the problem of how to correctly draw long curved lines. An ideal curved line is a fair curve - one which has a smooth continuous flow to it. It turns out to be relatively simple to do, but does require a good eye. The process essentially involves the use of long wooden battens of straight grain and clear of knots. To create the curve, you "loosely" bend the batten around nails which are tacked onto the "grid" according to measurements in the plans. It's basically "connect the dots". The boat plans includes a table of offsets which have measurements for where you place your marks. Once the curve looks fair, you draw the curved line against the batten with a pencil, remove the batten and do the same thing for the next line until you have something that looks like a boat. The following photos show the line for the profile sheer (top edge viewed from side) and a waterline (water level at 6 inches viewed from top). Notice how two different views of the boat are drawn in the same space.



Drawing the Body Plan

The body plan is the head on view of the boat and is drawn right over the other 2 plan views that were previously drawn. The measurements are taken from the lofted lines in the previous 2 plan views and the batten is used again to "connect the dots" and draw curved lines for the body plan sections. The body plan shows 7 cross sections of the hull from front to back (stern to transom) with the 5 equally spaced stations in between. The layout of each station are the templates for the actual station molds which will be used later to form the hull. The photos below show the shapes of the hull from head on. The reason for the white paper overlay is to show the construction detail of how the hull planking will join to the keelson and keel on the bottom of the boat. Because there are 7 body sections all overlapping in the same space on the plans, separate pieces of paper are tacked in place as needed for each section so that the details are not a hopeless mess of overlapping lines.



Final Results Example

The following is an example of a different boat showing the 3 plan views. In the actual lofting, these views are drawn right over each other.



Lessons Learned
I'm not crazy about the red rosin paper. It has small wrinkles in it that slightly distort the lines. It's not enough to throw off any measurements by anything more than 1/64th probably, but it's not ideal. Next time, I'd whitewash the plywood and draw onto that directly.

Lofting Materials List:

  • Red Rosin Paper, Home Depot, $12
  • 3/4 Plywood 4×8, Lowes, $23.88
  • 1×4x12 clear pine, Home Depot, $12

Project Materials Summary:

  • Plans and Book: $60
  • Lofting Supplies: $47.88

- Total Project Expenses so far: $107.88

Labor Hours Summary:

  • 5/29/09 - 6/8/09: Lofting - 12 Hours

- Total Project Labor Hours so far: 12 Hours
Hey Matt,
Chapelle was right…cannot be too careful with layouts…..take your time.
We do a lot of boat strip planking using WRC and our hull moulds must be spot on.
 

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Lofting

After about 12 hours of work, nearly all lofting is complete and I can finally start some construction! The famous boat builder and author, Howard I. Chapelle wrote in his aptly named book "Boatbuilding" - "There was never a boat built in which too much lofting had been done". By lofting, Mr. Chapelle is referring to the laying out of the lines and drawing of construction details to full scale, a tedious practice he writes "avoids much trying and fitting".

Setting up the lofting area

To begin, I cut up a 4×8 sheet of 3/4 plywood to create a lofting "table" that is 12'x32". This is large enough to draw all 3 plan views (sheer, body and half-breadth) which are drawn over each other. After leveling the table, I rolled out red rosin paper, an option some builders use to draw the plans on instead of drawing right onto the plywood (or traditionally.. the floor of a loft). I then layed out the all important "base line" and tacked a straight edge on that line from which measurements would be made. A large grid is then drawn over the entire area to indicate vertical stations and horizontal waterlines.



Drawing the Profile and Half-Breath view

There are virtually no straight lines on this boat. I was immediately faced with the problem of how to correctly draw long curved lines. An ideal curved line is a fair curve - one which has a smooth continuous flow to it. It turns out to be relatively simple to do, but does require a good eye. The process essentially involves the use of long wooden battens of straight grain and clear of knots. To create the curve, you "loosely" bend the batten around nails which are tacked onto the "grid" according to measurements in the plans. It's basically "connect the dots". The boat plans includes a table of offsets which have measurements for where you place your marks. Once the curve looks fair, you draw the curved line against the batten with a pencil, remove the batten and do the same thing for the next line until you have something that looks like a boat. The following photos show the line for the profile sheer (top edge viewed from side) and a waterline (water level at 6 inches viewed from top). Notice how two different views of the boat are drawn in the same space.



Drawing the Body Plan

The body plan is the head on view of the boat and is drawn right over the other 2 plan views that were previously drawn. The measurements are taken from the lofted lines in the previous 2 plan views and the batten is used again to "connect the dots" and draw curved lines for the body plan sections. The body plan shows 7 cross sections of the hull from front to back (stern to transom) with the 5 equally spaced stations in between. The layout of each station are the templates for the actual station molds which will be used later to form the hull. The photos below show the shapes of the hull from head on. The reason for the white paper overlay is to show the construction detail of how the hull planking will join to the keelson and keel on the bottom of the boat. Because there are 7 body sections all overlapping in the same space on the plans, separate pieces of paper are tacked in place as needed for each section so that the details are not a hopeless mess of overlapping lines.



Final Results Example

The following is an example of a different boat showing the 3 plan views. In the actual lofting, these views are drawn right over each other.



Lessons Learned
I'm not crazy about the red rosin paper. It has small wrinkles in it that slightly distort the lines. It's not enough to throw off any measurements by anything more than 1/64th probably, but it's not ideal. Next time, I'd whitewash the plywood and draw onto that directly.

Lofting Materials List:

  • Red Rosin Paper, Home Depot, $12
  • 3/4 Plywood 4×8, Lowes, $23.88
  • 1×4x12 clear pine, Home Depot, $12

Project Materials Summary:

  • Plans and Book: $60
  • Lofting Supplies: $47.88

- Total Project Expenses so far: $107.88

Labor Hours Summary:

  • 5/29/09 - 6/8/09: Lofting - 12 Hours

- Total Project Labor Hours so far: 12 Hours
wow this is amazing…
 

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Building the Molds

Finished the molds today! The molds create the form upon which the boat will be built. There are 5 mold forms for this boat.

The shape of the molds are taken right from the lofting drawing. Picking Up refers to techniques of transferring shapes on the lofting to boards so that the shapes can be cut out. To pick up the mold shapes, I ground off half of the heads of a few dozen nails so that they would lay flat exactly on the lines in the drawing that I wanted to transfer. I then placed boards over the nails and lightly hammered down until the nails stuck into the wood. The boards are flipped over and a batten is used to draw a curve along the impressions left by the nail heads. The molds are then cut out on a bandsaw (both sides at the same time). The 2 sides of the mold are then compared to the lofting for any fine tuning. They are then nailed in place on the lofting and tied together with cross-spalls and cleats.







Next is building the strongback and placing the molds.

Mold Materials List:

  • (2) 1×8x12, Lowes, $24
  • (2) 1×6x12, Lowes, $12
  • Misc nails and scrap lumber

Project Materials Summary:

  • Plans and Book: $60
  • Lofting Supplies: $47.88
  • Mold Supplies: $36

- Total Project Expenses so far: $143.88

Labor Hours Summary:

  • 5/29/09 - 6/8/09: Lofting - 12 Hours
  • 6/14/09 - 6/20/09: Building Molds: 5 Hours

- Total Project Labor Hours so far: 17 Hours
 

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Building the Molds

Finished the molds today! The molds create the form upon which the boat will be built. There are 5 mold forms for this boat.

The shape of the molds are taken right from the lofting drawing. Picking Up refers to techniques of transferring shapes on the lofting to boards so that the shapes can be cut out. To pick up the mold shapes, I ground off half of the heads of a few dozen nails so that they would lay flat exactly on the lines in the drawing that I wanted to transfer. I then placed boards over the nails and lightly hammered down until the nails stuck into the wood. The boards are flipped over and a batten is used to draw a curve along the impressions left by the nail heads. The molds are then cut out on a bandsaw (both sides at the same time). The 2 sides of the mold are then compared to the lofting for any fine tuning. They are then nailed in place on the lofting and tied together with cross-spalls and cleats.







Next is building the strongback and placing the molds.

Mold Materials List:

  • (2) 1×8x12, Lowes, $24
  • (2) 1×6x12, Lowes, $12
  • Misc nails and scrap lumber

Project Materials Summary:

  • Plans and Book: $60
  • Lofting Supplies: $47.88
  • Mold Supplies: $36

- Total Project Expenses so far: $143.88

Labor Hours Summary:

  • 5/29/09 - 6/8/09: Lofting - 12 Hours
  • 6/14/09 - 6/20/09: Building Molds: 5 Hours

- Total Project Labor Hours so far: 17 Hours
we're looking good , matt .
thanks for showing us the steps in this and the costs .
im going to favorite this so i can enjoy it with you .

hi jim , i know your here close !
 

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5,687 Posts
Building the Molds

Finished the molds today! The molds create the form upon which the boat will be built. There are 5 mold forms for this boat.

The shape of the molds are taken right from the lofting drawing. Picking Up refers to techniques of transferring shapes on the lofting to boards so that the shapes can be cut out. To pick up the mold shapes, I ground off half of the heads of a few dozen nails so that they would lay flat exactly on the lines in the drawing that I wanted to transfer. I then placed boards over the nails and lightly hammered down until the nails stuck into the wood. The boards are flipped over and a batten is used to draw a curve along the impressions left by the nail heads. The molds are then cut out on a bandsaw (both sides at the same time). The 2 sides of the mold are then compared to the lofting for any fine tuning. They are then nailed in place on the lofting and tied together with cross-spalls and cleats.







Next is building the strongback and placing the molds.

Mold Materials List:

  • (2) 1×8x12, Lowes, $24
  • (2) 1×6x12, Lowes, $12
  • Misc nails and scrap lumber

Project Materials Summary:

  • Plans and Book: $60
  • Lofting Supplies: $47.88
  • Mold Supplies: $36

- Total Project Expenses so far: $143.88

Labor Hours Summary:

  • 5/29/09 - 6/8/09: Lofting - 12 Hours
  • 6/14/09 - 6/20/09: Building Molds: 5 Hours

- Total Project Labor Hours so far: 17 Hours
Very interesting, thanks for blogging this. Great detail.
 

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Building the Molds

Finished the molds today! The molds create the form upon which the boat will be built. There are 5 mold forms for this boat.

The shape of the molds are taken right from the lofting drawing. Picking Up refers to techniques of transferring shapes on the lofting to boards so that the shapes can be cut out. To pick up the mold shapes, I ground off half of the heads of a few dozen nails so that they would lay flat exactly on the lines in the drawing that I wanted to transfer. I then placed boards over the nails and lightly hammered down until the nails stuck into the wood. The boards are flipped over and a batten is used to draw a curve along the impressions left by the nail heads. The molds are then cut out on a bandsaw (both sides at the same time). The 2 sides of the mold are then compared to the lofting for any fine tuning. They are then nailed in place on the lofting and tied together with cross-spalls and cleats.







Next is building the strongback and placing the molds.

Mold Materials List:

  • (2) 1×8x12, Lowes, $24
  • (2) 1×6x12, Lowes, $12
  • Misc nails and scrap lumber

Project Materials Summary:

  • Plans and Book: $60
  • Lofting Supplies: $47.88
  • Mold Supplies: $36

- Total Project Expenses so far: $143.88

Labor Hours Summary:

  • 5/29/09 - 6/8/09: Lofting - 12 Hours
  • 6/14/09 - 6/20/09: Building Molds: 5 Hours

- Total Project Labor Hours so far: 17 Hours
Hey matt,
Keep it coming man….looking good.
 
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