LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
I have seen all the post about building these drum sanders and now I need one. Anyway I am wondering what my easiest method of cutting the circles for the drum would be. Keep in muind I don't own a bandsaw. But maybe this is a good excuse to buy one. Anyway what ideas do you guys have that will keep my sanity for cutting that many circles. Thanks

Pat
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
Are you talking about cutting a bunch of circles from mdf or plywood, in order to glue them all together to form a long cylinder?
If that's the case, a hole saw could crank out the roughs pretty quickly. Then you could use a circle jig with a router to finish them all, or ONE for use as a template. Use the template and a pattern bit (straight bit with a flush bearing) to cut out the rest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for ideas guys. Never even thought of the hole saw. I have a a circle cutting template for my router but I don't think it can go that small. But I could build a jig for it and that would be easy and give me clean circles. Thanks for waking my brain up!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,104 Posts
The circle cutter that Jason mentioned will cut much faster, and cleaner, than a hole saw. But you can't use it over 250rpm. I've tried, and the chuck on the drill press would always come loose. But at 250rpm, it works great. Personally, I'd cut them on my CNC Router. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,787 Posts
Building a V sander is on my list. I've thought about it quite a bit but I have not really done anything yet.

I've got this idea about making some end caps for a piece of 4 inch pvc pipe and using the pvc for my drum. It seems like the surface of the pvc would be a better surface to work with.

Is this a really dumb idea?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
769 Posts
Rich that is what I did, used PVC pipe. I did however put maple "slugs" inside the pipe to stiffen it. I used 3/4" threaded rod for the shaft and jam nutted the slugs every few (8-9?) inches inside the pipe. I think the pipe would have heated and flexed had I not done that. My drum was for a wide thickness sander and it is 32" long.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,314 Posts
swayze,

Keep in mind that the initial cutting of the disks is a rough cut. After you glue the stack together on the shaft, then you run a piece of MDF or other very flat board through with sandpaper on one side to true up the drum. This is done after the machine is mostly complete. Most of the drum sanders use about a 5" drum. I'm building my drum sander from the shop notes plans. What plans are you using, or are you designing your own?

MDF provides a much smoother surface than even B. Birch cab. grade ply. Using plywood could result in striped lines in your workpiece you are sanding.

Rance
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Rance, right now I'm thinking of building the v-drum from the plans on stockroom. But also have thoughts of making a thickness style drum sander instead.

What you said about the MDF being smoother makes sense. I was hoping to use plywood just because the MDF is so hard on bits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
I used mdf, made a 5/8" hole in 18 rough mdf discs. then I mounted a 1 1/2" piece of the 5/8" rod in scrap wood and clamped it to my router table and spun it to true up the disc. If I had to do it again (and I just might) I'd try tunring it quick and easy on a lathe. Since now I have a metal lathe with a carriage that moves it will be all the same thickness across its length. Still, mine came out fine and works like a charm, here is the video of it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
459 Posts
"Also is there any reason most guys are using MDF instead plywood when making these circles?"

MDF would be easier to keep balanced due to it's more uniform material and glue mixture. Plywood can have voids, or knots in the veneer, or thicker glue lines in spots, all affecting the balance of the finished drum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,017 Posts
I am using a hole saw on mine. Doesn't have to be pretty or expensive, just round… A 4" hole saw, a drill press, and you are good to go.

I'm using scrap cabinet grade "void free" allegedly birch ply for my disks. MDF doesn't like humidity, and the Texas coast has a LOT of humidity…

I probably wouldn't use anything like B/C (sheathing grade) ply though, WAY too many voids, way too rough to glue well…

I have seen one guy use SCH 40 PVC pipe with spalted maple (scrap) disks as braces. Not sure I like the PVC idea though, that drum gets hot enough, it might just deform.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
Rich,

I am in the process of finishing up my drum sander. I used MDF for my drum and that seems to be a good solution.

Using PVC was brought up in a previous thread. A couple issues I see with that are that there is limited gluing surface unless you fill it somehow, and also that there is very little mass. I wonder if the PVC could be filled with something that hardens (concrete? fiberglass?). This would help secure it in place, but would also provide additional mass that will provide inertia for the spinning drum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
A hole saw with MDF seems to make the most sense.
When somebody mentioned using the machine, itself, with sandpaper on a flat scrap, to turn the sanding drum, the lightbulb went off.
Any other process or steps taken to try to accomplish this are like walking around the block to go next door.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
Mike I agree with you that the MDF makes the most sense.

But, there is one thing that I have learned on this site. That is that people here have lots of great ideas, and find some really creative solutions. For me the PVC was not an appealing alternative, but I am confident somebody will find a way to make it work, and it might very well be superior to the current MDF standard.

Watching ideas snowball on this site is great. There is something for everybody here. Both to learn and to inspire.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top