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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Variety of parts and assembly

During one of many Melbourne lockdowns (we had more than any other city worldwide) number two I seem to remember I started on a Dan Gatto plan for a 1930's Model A Ford.
It was fun to do but a few challenges. Firstly all the measurements were in imperial i.e. inches. We in Oz are metric and have been for a long time now. The type face on the plans is very small which I overcame pretty easily, enlarging everything then writing out my next few steps in preparation. Then hitting the workshop. There was one pretty significant error in the plans which without some help from (this website) PJonesy in NZ I think it may have got the better of me. The angle of the steering column through the bulkhead is shown on the plans as 45 degrees where as it actually needs to be 30 degrees.
Aside from all the excuses it turned out okay if I do say so.

A couple of months ago I decided I'd go around again, so here we go…..

This time I'm making the model with the hood up whereas the 1st one was hood down.
Two main timbers are American Maple and West Australian Jarrah. Both hard woods but nice to work with. The Jarrah is pretty rugged on tools eg chisels and plains. Not a lot of chisel work though in this sort of build.

Lots of tools used:
Drop saw, Scroll saw, Bandsaw, Japanese hand saw. Drill press, Faustner drill bits, Hole saw, Compass and also a Protractor, and the mandatory small hobby clamps to list a few.
This is the engine hood all from Jarrah

Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Wood stain


Tire Wood Wheel Automotive tire Font

This shows a variety of parts in various stages of completion, at the top are the two rear fenders or mud guards, marked out using a compass and ready for cutting on the bandsaw. You could also use a scroll saw with a course blade as the timber is an inch thick. Leaning on one is the radiator. The Maple surrounded by the Jarrah makes a nice contrast. The cap is just pine dowel. The hole at the bottom is for an emblem which I'm ebonising.
There are some parts for the front fenders and spare wheel housing. Also the front seat which has fine lines on them for effect. And lastly the hand made wheels which are heaps better on their second build than the first.
Reason being using a drill press and just being more fussy, in terms of finish.

Boat Watercraft Wood Toy Rectangle


So this is the body with the rumble seat and steering column both fitted. You can also see the contoured side panels.

Musical instrument Wood Flooring Rectangle Hardwood


In this shot you can see the bulkhead including the fuel tank and the steering column going through to the chassis.

Furniture Table Wood Rectangle Outdoor furniture


Lastly the chassis itself which is the first part of the construction. Here though it is completed and fitted (glued) to the floor pan.

Stay tuned…..
 

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4,447 Posts
Variety of parts and assembly

During one of many Melbourne lockdowns (we had more than any other city worldwide) number two I seem to remember I started on a Dan Gatto plan for a 1930's Model A Ford.
It was fun to do but a few challenges. Firstly all the measurements were in imperial i.e. inches. We in Oz are metric and have been for a long time now. The type face on the plans is very small which I overcame pretty easily, enlarging everything then writing out my next few steps in preparation. Then hitting the workshop. There was one pretty significant error in the plans which without some help from (this website) PJonesy in NZ I think it may have got the better of me. The angle of the steering column through the bulkhead is shown on the plans as 45 degrees where as it actually needs to be 30 degrees.
Aside from all the excuses it turned out okay if I do say so.

A couple of months ago I decided I'd go around again, so here we go…..

This time I'm making the model with the hood up whereas the 1st one was hood down.
Two main timbers are American Maple and West Australian Jarrah. Both hard woods but nice to work with. The Jarrah is pretty rugged on tools eg chisels and plains. Not a lot of chisel work though in this sort of build.

Lots of tools used:
Drop saw, Scroll saw, Bandsaw, Japanese hand saw. Drill press, Faustner drill bits, Hole saw, Compass and also a Protractor, and the mandatory small hobby clamps to list a few.
This is the engine hood all from Jarrah

Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Wood stain


Tire Wood Wheel Automotive tire Font

This shows a variety of parts in various stages of completion, at the top are the two rear fenders or mud guards, marked out using a compass and ready for cutting on the bandsaw. You could also use a scroll saw with a course blade as the timber is an inch thick. Leaning on one is the radiator. The Maple surrounded by the Jarrah makes a nice contrast. The cap is just pine dowel. The hole at the bottom is for an emblem which I'm ebonising.
There are some parts for the front fenders and spare wheel housing. Also the front seat which has fine lines on them for effect. And lastly the hand made wheels which are heaps better on their second build than the first.
Reason being using a drill press and just being more fussy, in terms of finish.

Boat Watercraft Wood Toy Rectangle


So this is the body with the rumble seat and steering column both fitted. You can also see the contoured side panels.

Musical instrument Wood Flooring Rectangle Hardwood


In this shot you can see the bulkhead including the fuel tank and the steering column going through to the chassis.

Furniture Table Wood Rectangle Outdoor furniture


Lastly the chassis itself which is the first part of the construction. Here though it is completed and fitted (glued) to the floor pan.

Stay tuned…..
I love to see a blog from someone else. Thanks.
 

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Variety of parts and assembly

During one of many Melbourne lockdowns (we had more than any other city worldwide) number two I seem to remember I started on a Dan Gatto plan for a 1930's Model A Ford.
It was fun to do but a few challenges. Firstly all the measurements were in imperial i.e. inches. We in Oz are metric and have been for a long time now. The type face on the plans is very small which I overcame pretty easily, enlarging everything then writing out my next few steps in preparation. Then hitting the workshop. There was one pretty significant error in the plans which without some help from (this website) PJonesy in NZ I think it may have got the better of me. The angle of the steering column through the bulkhead is shown on the plans as 45 degrees where as it actually needs to be 30 degrees.
Aside from all the excuses it turned out okay if I do say so.

A couple of months ago I decided I'd go around again, so here we go…..

This time I'm making the model with the hood up whereas the 1st one was hood down.
Two main timbers are American Maple and West Australian Jarrah. Both hard woods but nice to work with. The Jarrah is pretty rugged on tools eg chisels and plains. Not a lot of chisel work though in this sort of build.

Lots of tools used:
Drop saw, Scroll saw, Bandsaw, Japanese hand saw. Drill press, Faustner drill bits, Hole saw, Compass and also a Protractor, and the mandatory small hobby clamps to list a few.
This is the engine hood all from Jarrah

Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Wood stain


Tire Wood Wheel Automotive tire Font

This shows a variety of parts in various stages of completion, at the top are the two rear fenders or mud guards, marked out using a compass and ready for cutting on the bandsaw. You could also use a scroll saw with a course blade as the timber is an inch thick. Leaning on one is the radiator. The Maple surrounded by the Jarrah makes a nice contrast. The cap is just pine dowel. The hole at the bottom is for an emblem which I'm ebonising.
There are some parts for the front fenders and spare wheel housing. Also the front seat which has fine lines on them for effect. And lastly the hand made wheels which are heaps better on their second build than the first.
Reason being using a drill press and just being more fussy, in terms of finish.

Boat Watercraft Wood Toy Rectangle


So this is the body with the rumble seat and steering column both fitted. You can also see the contoured side panels.

Musical instrument Wood Flooring Rectangle Hardwood


In this shot you can see the bulkhead including the fuel tank and the steering column going through to the chassis.

Furniture Table Wood Rectangle Outdoor furniture


Lastly the chassis itself which is the first part of the construction. Here though it is completed and fitted (glued) to the floor pan.

Stay tuned…..
Minor suggestions: All Model A Ford steering wheels had four spokes. All instruments were at the center of the dashboard, not in front of the driver - gas gauge, ammeter, speedometer, ignition switch (that's all)
 

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Variety of parts and assembly

During one of many Melbourne lockdowns (we had more than any other city worldwide) number two I seem to remember I started on a Dan Gatto plan for a 1930's Model A Ford.
It was fun to do but a few challenges. Firstly all the measurements were in imperial i.e. inches. We in Oz are metric and have been for a long time now. The type face on the plans is very small which I overcame pretty easily, enlarging everything then writing out my next few steps in preparation. Then hitting the workshop. There was one pretty significant error in the plans which without some help from (this website) PJonesy in NZ I think it may have got the better of me. The angle of the steering column through the bulkhead is shown on the plans as 45 degrees where as it actually needs to be 30 degrees.
Aside from all the excuses it turned out okay if I do say so.

A couple of months ago I decided I'd go around again, so here we go…..

This time I'm making the model with the hood up whereas the 1st one was hood down.
Two main timbers are American Maple and West Australian Jarrah. Both hard woods but nice to work with. The Jarrah is pretty rugged on tools eg chisels and plains. Not a lot of chisel work though in this sort of build.

Lots of tools used:
Drop saw, Scroll saw, Bandsaw, Japanese hand saw. Drill press, Faustner drill bits, Hole saw, Compass and also a Protractor, and the mandatory small hobby clamps to list a few.
This is the engine hood all from Jarrah

Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Wood stain


Tire Wood Wheel Automotive tire Font

This shows a variety of parts in various stages of completion, at the top are the two rear fenders or mud guards, marked out using a compass and ready for cutting on the bandsaw. You could also use a scroll saw with a course blade as the timber is an inch thick. Leaning on one is the radiator. The Maple surrounded by the Jarrah makes a nice contrast. The cap is just pine dowel. The hole at the bottom is for an emblem which I'm ebonising.
There are some parts for the front fenders and spare wheel housing. Also the front seat which has fine lines on them for effect. And lastly the hand made wheels which are heaps better on their second build than the first.
Reason being using a drill press and just being more fussy, in terms of finish.

Boat Watercraft Wood Toy Rectangle


So this is the body with the rumble seat and steering column both fitted. You can also see the contoured side panels.

Musical instrument Wood Flooring Rectangle Hardwood


In this shot you can see the bulkhead including the fuel tank and the steering column going through to the chassis.

Furniture Table Wood Rectangle Outdoor furniture


Lastly the chassis itself which is the first part of the construction. Here though it is completed and fitted (glued) to the floor pan.

Stay tuned…..
Well done Kerry, I can see the improvements as you described. Practice makes perfect as they say. Looking forward to see the completed car.
I will be in Melbourne on Thursday visiting my daughter for the first time in 3 years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Variety of parts and assembly

During one of many Melbourne lockdowns (we had more than any other city worldwide) number two I seem to remember I started on a Dan Gatto plan for a 1930's Model A Ford.
It was fun to do but a few challenges. Firstly all the measurements were in imperial i.e. inches. We in Oz are metric and have been for a long time now. The type face on the plans is very small which I overcame pretty easily, enlarging everything then writing out my next few steps in preparation. Then hitting the workshop. There was one pretty significant error in the plans which without some help from (this website) PJonesy in NZ I think it may have got the better of me. The angle of the steering column through the bulkhead is shown on the plans as 45 degrees where as it actually needs to be 30 degrees.
Aside from all the excuses it turned out okay if I do say so.

A couple of months ago I decided I'd go around again, so here we go…..

This time I'm making the model with the hood up whereas the 1st one was hood down.
Two main timbers are American Maple and West Australian Jarrah. Both hard woods but nice to work with. The Jarrah is pretty rugged on tools eg chisels and plains. Not a lot of chisel work though in this sort of build.

Lots of tools used:
Drop saw, Scroll saw, Bandsaw, Japanese hand saw. Drill press, Faustner drill bits, Hole saw, Compass and also a Protractor, and the mandatory small hobby clamps to list a few.
This is the engine hood all from Jarrah

Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Wood stain


Tire Wood Wheel Automotive tire Font

This shows a variety of parts in various stages of completion, at the top are the two rear fenders or mud guards, marked out using a compass and ready for cutting on the bandsaw. You could also use a scroll saw with a course blade as the timber is an inch thick. Leaning on one is the radiator. The Maple surrounded by the Jarrah makes a nice contrast. The cap is just pine dowel. The hole at the bottom is for an emblem which I'm ebonising.
There are some parts for the front fenders and spare wheel housing. Also the front seat which has fine lines on them for effect. And lastly the hand made wheels which are heaps better on their second build than the first.
Reason being using a drill press and just being more fussy, in terms of finish.



So this is the body with the rumble seat and steering column both fitted. You can also see the contoured side panels.

Musical instrument Wood Flooring Rectangle Hardwood


In this shot you can see the bulkhead including the fuel tank and the steering column going through to the chassis.

Furniture Table Wood Rectangle Outdoor furniture


Lastly the chassis itself which is the first part of the construction. Here though it is completed and fitted (glued) to the floor pan.

Stay tuned…..
Minor suggestions: All Model A Ford steering wheels had four spokes. All instruments were at the center of the dashboard, not in front of the driver - gas gauge, ammeter, speedometer, ignition switch (that s all)

- Phil32
Point taken however when the plans says three one goes with three or at least I did….
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Variety of parts and assembly

During one of many Melbourne lockdowns (we had more than any other city worldwide) number two I seem to remember I started on a Dan Gatto plan for a 1930's Model A Ford.
It was fun to do but a few challenges. Firstly all the measurements were in imperial i.e. inches. We in Oz are metric and have been for a long time now. The type face on the plans is very small which I overcame pretty easily, enlarging everything then writing out my next few steps in preparation. Then hitting the workshop. There was one pretty significant error in the plans which without some help from (this website) PJonesy in NZ I think it may have got the better of me. The angle of the steering column through the bulkhead is shown on the plans as 45 degrees where as it actually needs to be 30 degrees.
Aside from all the excuses it turned out okay if I do say so.

A couple of months ago I decided I'd go around again, so here we go…..

This time I'm making the model with the hood up whereas the 1st one was hood down.
Two main timbers are American Maple and West Australian Jarrah. Both hard woods but nice to work with. The Jarrah is pretty rugged on tools eg chisels and plains. Not a lot of chisel work though in this sort of build.

Lots of tools used:
Drop saw, Scroll saw, Bandsaw, Japanese hand saw. Drill press, Faustner drill bits, Hole saw, Compass and also a Protractor, and the mandatory small hobby clamps to list a few.
This is the engine hood all from Jarrah

Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Wood stain


Tire Wood Wheel Automotive tire Font

This shows a variety of parts in various stages of completion, at the top are the two rear fenders or mud guards, marked out using a compass and ready for cutting on the bandsaw. You could also use a scroll saw with a course blade as the timber is an inch thick. Leaning on one is the radiator. The Maple surrounded by the Jarrah makes a nice contrast. The cap is just pine dowel. The hole at the bottom is for an emblem which I'm ebonising.
There are some parts for the front fenders and spare wheel housing. Also the front seat which has fine lines on them for effect. And lastly the hand made wheels which are heaps better on their second build than the first.
Reason being using a drill press and just being more fussy, in terms of finish.

Boat Watercraft Wood Toy Rectangle


So this is the body with the rumble seat and steering column both fitted. You can also see the contoured side panels.

Musical instrument Wood Flooring Rectangle Hardwood


In this shot you can see the bulkhead including the fuel tank and the steering column going through to the chassis.

Furniture Table Wood Rectangle Outdoor furniture


Lastly the chassis itself which is the first part of the construction. Here though it is completed and fitted (glued) to the floor pan.

Stay tuned…..
Well done Kerry, I can see the improvements as you described. Practice makes perfect as they say. Looking forward to see the completed car.
I will be in Melbourne on Thursday visiting my daughter for the first time in 3 years.

- Pjonesy
Thanks Peter, coming from the master, I'll take that as a compliment.
Oh how lovely. Three years that's a long wait so I hope you have a good time together as I'm sure you will. I managed a trip to Perth in May after 2.5 years to see some family which was very nice. Bring some warm clothes it's still cold here.
Cheers Kerry
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Variety of parts and assembly

During one of many Melbourne lockdowns (we had more than any other city worldwide) number two I seem to remember I started on a Dan Gatto plan for a 1930's Model A Ford.
It was fun to do but a few challenges. Firstly all the measurements were in imperial i.e. inches. We in Oz are metric and have been for a long time now. The type face on the plans is very small which I overcame pretty easily, enlarging everything then writing out my next few steps in preparation. Then hitting the workshop. There was one pretty significant error in the plans which without some help from (this website) PJonesy in NZ I think it may have got the better of me. The angle of the steering column through the bulkhead is shown on the plans as 45 degrees where as it actually needs to be 30 degrees.
Aside from all the excuses it turned out okay if I do say so.

A couple of months ago I decided I'd go around again, so here we go…..

This time I'm making the model with the hood up whereas the 1st one was hood down.
Two main timbers are American Maple and West Australian Jarrah. Both hard woods but nice to work with. The Jarrah is pretty rugged on tools eg chisels and plains. Not a lot of chisel work though in this sort of build.

Lots of tools used:
Drop saw, Scroll saw, Bandsaw, Japanese hand saw. Drill press, Faustner drill bits, Hole saw, Compass and also a Protractor, and the mandatory small hobby clamps to list a few.
This is the engine hood all from Jarrah

Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Wood stain


Tire Wood Wheel Automotive tire Font

This shows a variety of parts in various stages of completion, at the top are the two rear fenders or mud guards, marked out using a compass and ready for cutting on the bandsaw. You could also use a scroll saw with a course blade as the timber is an inch thick. Leaning on one is the radiator. The Maple surrounded by the Jarrah makes a nice contrast. The cap is just pine dowel. The hole at the bottom is for an emblem which I'm ebonising.
There are some parts for the front fenders and spare wheel housing. Also the front seat which has fine lines on them for effect. And lastly the hand made wheels which are heaps better on their second build than the first.
Reason being using a drill press and just being more fussy, in terms of finish.

Boat Watercraft Wood Toy Rectangle


So this is the body with the rumble seat and steering column both fitted. You can also see the contoured side panels.

Musical instrument Wood Flooring Rectangle Hardwood


In this shot you can see the bulkhead including the fuel tank and the steering column going through to the chassis.

Furniture Table Wood Rectangle Outdoor furniture


Lastly the chassis itself which is the first part of the construction. Here though it is completed and fitted (glued) to the floor pan.

Stay tuned…..
I love to see a blog from someone else. Thanks.

- Dutchy
Thanks to you too Dutchy.
 

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4,447 Posts
Variety of parts and assembly

During one of many Melbourne lockdowns (we had more than any other city worldwide) number two I seem to remember I started on a Dan Gatto plan for a 1930's Model A Ford.
It was fun to do but a few challenges. Firstly all the measurements were in imperial i.e. inches. We in Oz are metric and have been for a long time now. The type face on the plans is very small which I overcame pretty easily, enlarging everything then writing out my next few steps in preparation. Then hitting the workshop. There was one pretty significant error in the plans which without some help from (this website) PJonesy in NZ I think it may have got the better of me. The angle of the steering column through the bulkhead is shown on the plans as 45 degrees where as it actually needs to be 30 degrees.
Aside from all the excuses it turned out okay if I do say so.

A couple of months ago I decided I'd go around again, so here we go…..

This time I'm making the model with the hood up whereas the 1st one was hood down.
Two main timbers are American Maple and West Australian Jarrah. Both hard woods but nice to work with. The Jarrah is pretty rugged on tools eg chisels and plains. Not a lot of chisel work though in this sort of build.

Lots of tools used:
Drop saw, Scroll saw, Bandsaw, Japanese hand saw. Drill press, Faustner drill bits, Hole saw, Compass and also a Protractor, and the mandatory small hobby clamps to list a few.
This is the engine hood all from Jarrah

Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Wood stain


Tire Wood Wheel Automotive tire Font

This shows a variety of parts in various stages of completion, at the top are the two rear fenders or mud guards, marked out using a compass and ready for cutting on the bandsaw. You could also use a scroll saw with a course blade as the timber is an inch thick. Leaning on one is the radiator. The Maple surrounded by the Jarrah makes a nice contrast. The cap is just pine dowel. The hole at the bottom is for an emblem which I'm ebonising.
There are some parts for the front fenders and spare wheel housing. Also the front seat which has fine lines on them for effect. And lastly the hand made wheels which are heaps better on their second build than the first.
Reason being using a drill press and just being more fussy, in terms of finish.

Boat Watercraft Wood Toy Rectangle


So this is the body with the rumble seat and steering column both fitted. You can also see the contoured side panels.

Musical instrument Wood Flooring Rectangle Hardwood


In this shot you can see the bulkhead including the fuel tank and the steering column going through to the chassis.

Furniture Table Wood Rectangle Outdoor furniture


Lastly the chassis itself which is the first part of the construction. Here though it is completed and fitted (glued) to the floor pan.

Stay tuned…..
You maybe glad with:
https://dutchypatterns.com/jig-for-making-spoke-wheel-holes-on-a-drill-press-free-download/

and

https://www.lumberjocks.com/Dutchy/blog/129138
 

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1,941 Posts
Variety of parts and assembly

During one of many Melbourne lockdowns (we had more than any other city worldwide) number two I seem to remember I started on a Dan Gatto plan for a 1930's Model A Ford.
It was fun to do but a few challenges. Firstly all the measurements were in imperial i.e. inches. We in Oz are metric and have been for a long time now. The type face on the plans is very small which I overcame pretty easily, enlarging everything then writing out my next few steps in preparation. Then hitting the workshop. There was one pretty significant error in the plans which without some help from (this website) PJonesy in NZ I think it may have got the better of me. The angle of the steering column through the bulkhead is shown on the plans as 45 degrees where as it actually needs to be 30 degrees.
Aside from all the excuses it turned out okay if I do say so.

A couple of months ago I decided I'd go around again, so here we go…..

This time I'm making the model with the hood up whereas the 1st one was hood down.
Two main timbers are American Maple and West Australian Jarrah. Both hard woods but nice to work with. The Jarrah is pretty rugged on tools eg chisels and plains. Not a lot of chisel work though in this sort of build.

Lots of tools used:
Drop saw, Scroll saw, Bandsaw, Japanese hand saw. Drill press, Faustner drill bits, Hole saw, Compass and also a Protractor, and the mandatory small hobby clamps to list a few.
This is the engine hood all from Jarrah

Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Wood stain


Tire Wood Wheel Automotive tire Font

This shows a variety of parts in various stages of completion, at the top are the two rear fenders or mud guards, marked out using a compass and ready for cutting on the bandsaw. You could also use a scroll saw with a course blade as the timber is an inch thick. Leaning on one is the radiator. The Maple surrounded by the Jarrah makes a nice contrast. The cap is just pine dowel. The hole at the bottom is for an emblem which I'm ebonising.
There are some parts for the front fenders and spare wheel housing. Also the front seat which has fine lines on them for effect. And lastly the hand made wheels which are heaps better on their second build than the first.
Reason being using a drill press and just being more fussy, in terms of finish.

Boat Watercraft Wood Toy Rectangle


So this is the body with the rumble seat and steering column both fitted. You can also see the contoured side panels.

Musical instrument Wood Flooring Rectangle Hardwood


In this shot you can see the bulkhead including the fuel tank and the steering column going through to the chassis.

Furniture Table Wood Rectangle Outdoor furniture


Lastly the chassis itself which is the first part of the construction. Here though it is completed and fitted (glued) to the floor pan.

Stay tuned…..
Point taken however when the plans says three one goes with three or at least I did….

- AussieLarks
That is certainly your choice, but the Aussie Model A Ford enthusiasts will probably point out the errors. If you get a chance, take a close look at a surviving Model A. The doors are not flat on the outer surface.
 

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Variety of parts and assembly

During one of many Melbourne lockdowns (we had more than any other city worldwide) number two I seem to remember I started on a Dan Gatto plan for a 1930's Model A Ford.
It was fun to do but a few challenges. Firstly all the measurements were in imperial i.e. inches. We in Oz are metric and have been for a long time now. The type face on the plans is very small which I overcame pretty easily, enlarging everything then writing out my next few steps in preparation. Then hitting the workshop. There was one pretty significant error in the plans which without some help from (this website) PJonesy in NZ I think it may have got the better of me. The angle of the steering column through the bulkhead is shown on the plans as 45 degrees where as it actually needs to be 30 degrees.
Aside from all the excuses it turned out okay if I do say so.

A couple of months ago I decided I'd go around again, so here we go…..

This time I'm making the model with the hood up whereas the 1st one was hood down.
Two main timbers are American Maple and West Australian Jarrah. Both hard woods but nice to work with. The Jarrah is pretty rugged on tools eg chisels and plains. Not a lot of chisel work though in this sort of build.

Lots of tools used:
Drop saw, Scroll saw, Bandsaw, Japanese hand saw. Drill press, Faustner drill bits, Hole saw, Compass and also a Protractor, and the mandatory small hobby clamps to list a few.
This is the engine hood all from Jarrah

Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Wood stain


Tire Wood Wheel Automotive tire Font

This shows a variety of parts in various stages of completion, at the top are the two rear fenders or mud guards, marked out using a compass and ready for cutting on the bandsaw. You could also use a scroll saw with a course blade as the timber is an inch thick. Leaning on one is the radiator. The Maple surrounded by the Jarrah makes a nice contrast. The cap is just pine dowel. The hole at the bottom is for an emblem which I'm ebonising.
There are some parts for the front fenders and spare wheel housing. Also the front seat which has fine lines on them for effect. And lastly the hand made wheels which are heaps better on their second build than the first.
Reason being using a drill press and just being more fussy, in terms of finish.

Boat Watercraft Wood Toy Rectangle


So this is the body with the rumble seat and steering column both fitted. You can also see the contoured side panels.

Musical instrument Wood Flooring Rectangle Hardwood


In this shot you can see the bulkhead including the fuel tank and the steering column going through to the chassis.

Furniture Table Wood Rectangle Outdoor furniture


Lastly the chassis itself which is the first part of the construction. Here though it is completed and fitted (glued) to the floor pan.

Stay tuned…..
G'day Kerry, I'm very impressed with this blog thus far sir.
Top marks to Peter for helping as so many on LumberJocks do, especially Jan (aka Dutchy).
I'm out of the shed for a good couple of months after a hip replacement in early August so seeing someone doing model replica's is very encouraging.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Variety of parts and assembly

During one of many Melbourne lockdowns (we had more than any other city worldwide) number two I seem to remember I started on a Dan Gatto plan for a 1930's Model A Ford.
It was fun to do but a few challenges. Firstly all the measurements were in imperial i.e. inches. We in Oz are metric and have been for a long time now. The type face on the plans is very small which I overcame pretty easily, enlarging everything then writing out my next few steps in preparation. Then hitting the workshop. There was one pretty significant error in the plans which without some help from (this website) PJonesy in NZ I think it may have got the better of me. The angle of the steering column through the bulkhead is shown on the plans as 45 degrees where as it actually needs to be 30 degrees.
Aside from all the excuses it turned out okay if I do say so.

A couple of months ago I decided I'd go around again, so here we go…..

This time I'm making the model with the hood up whereas the 1st one was hood down.
Two main timbers are American Maple and West Australian Jarrah. Both hard woods but nice to work with. The Jarrah is pretty rugged on tools eg chisels and plains. Not a lot of chisel work though in this sort of build.

Lots of tools used:
Drop saw, Scroll saw, Bandsaw, Japanese hand saw. Drill press, Faustner drill bits, Hole saw, Compass and also a Protractor, and the mandatory small hobby clamps to list a few.
This is the engine hood all from Jarrah

Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Wood stain


Tire Wood Wheel Automotive tire Font

This shows a variety of parts in various stages of completion, at the top are the two rear fenders or mud guards, marked out using a compass and ready for cutting on the bandsaw. You could also use a scroll saw with a course blade as the timber is an inch thick. Leaning on one is the radiator. The Maple surrounded by the Jarrah makes a nice contrast. The cap is just pine dowel. The hole at the bottom is for an emblem which I'm ebonising.
There are some parts for the front fenders and spare wheel housing. Also the front seat which has fine lines on them for effect. And lastly the hand made wheels which are heaps better on their second build than the first.
Reason being using a drill press and just being more fussy, in terms of finish.

Boat Watercraft Wood Toy Rectangle


So this is the body with the rumble seat and steering column both fitted. You can also see the contoured side panels.

Musical instrument Wood Flooring Rectangle Hardwood


In this shot you can see the bulkhead including the fuel tank and the steering column going through to the chassis.

Furniture Table Wood Rectangle Outdoor furniture


Lastly the chassis itself which is the first part of the construction. Here though it is completed and fitted (glued) to the floor pan.

Stay tuned…..
Hi Peter, Thanks for the compliment and for acknowledging the others too.
Could not agree more, people have been very helpful. I think I've a ways to go to get within a bulls roar of NZ Peter but hey it's blokes like that that inspire you to do a good job. You're no slouch either and so I hope you're making good progress and find yourself back at the tools sooner rather than later.

Cheers, Kerry
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Fitting up some of the parts

A bit more progress on the Model A.
So here we have a series of parts having just been sprayed using a gloss Polyurethane for a change. I tend to either use Danish oil or for boxes burnish them, so this is a bit different for me. Must say I'm pretty happy with the results.
Amongst this lot is the engine and oil sump (top LH corner) including the sump plug which often gets peoples attention. It's funny what interests people or catches their attention. This small part is deliberately made of three woods, Tasmanian blackwood, Pine dowel and a tiny piece of West Australian Jarrah.

Bottle Wood Automotive tire Grass Font


One or two coats and a light going over with 400 grit, seems to do the trick, well it does for me.

Furniture Plant Table Wood Wood stain


These are the rear mudguards or fenders for those in the US. Tail lights yet to be fitted or even made but one can see the pilot hole for its location. This photo also shows the rich and beautiful grain in my favourite timber American Maple. So hard and stable, just a joy to work with. Cuts cleanly too when you put a chisel to it. Fitting hinges to Maple is such a please compared to many other woods, alas I digress…....

Wood Hardwood Wood stain Tool Flooring


This is one of the two Headlight which will be fitted to the side of the radiator once it goes onto the front of the engine cover.

Brown Wood Hardwood Flooring Wood stain


Here you can see the two side lights fitted to the bulkhead. Like the headlights they are made from pine dowel and held in place with a toothpick, cut to the right size then rounded off and sanded. One thing I did learn early was the need to drill any holes in the dowel before one tried to cut it. It tends to be very brittle compared to either Cherry or especially Maple.

Wood Automotive design Vehicle Flooring Wheel


Finally for this episode the engine cowl is glued in place having had to finesse the positioning in order to have the radiator square and centred once I glue it in. You can also see the inside of the mudguards in the parts photo and now glued into place in this final photo. A little story for you, when I made the first Model A these guard pieces proved to be a massive challenge. Personally I found Dan's plans confusing. Yet this time around its been straight forward. Funny what starts out as confusing becomes clear and relatively easy.
Playing with wood and continually learning and challenging ourselves is to me such a joy. Who would have thought that 59 years after doing woodwork at high school one of life's greatest pleasures was still mucking around with wood.
 

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Fitting up some of the parts

A bit more progress on the Model A.
So here we have a series of parts having just been sprayed using a gloss Polyurethane for a change. I tend to either use Danish oil or for boxes burnish them, so this is a bit different for me. Must say I'm pretty happy with the results.
Amongst this lot is the engine and oil sump (top LH corner) including the sump plug which often gets peoples attention. It's funny what interests people or catches their attention. This small part is deliberately made of three woods, Tasmanian blackwood, Pine dowel and a tiny piece of West Australian Jarrah.

Bottle Wood Automotive tire Grass Font


One or two coats and a light going over with 400 grit, seems to do the trick, well it does for me.

Furniture Plant Table Wood Wood stain


These are the rear mudguards or fenders for those in the US. Tail lights yet to be fitted or even made but one can see the pilot hole for its location. This photo also shows the rich and beautiful grain in my favourite timber American Maple. So hard and stable, just a joy to work with. Cuts cleanly too when you put a chisel to it. Fitting hinges to Maple is such a please compared to many other woods, alas I digress…....

Wood Hardwood Wood stain Tool Flooring


This is one of the two Headlight which will be fitted to the side of the radiator once it goes onto the front of the engine cover.

Brown Wood Hardwood Flooring Wood stain


Here you can see the two side lights fitted to the bulkhead. Like the headlights they are made from pine dowel and held in place with a toothpick, cut to the right size then rounded off and sanded. One thing I did learn early was the need to drill any holes in the dowel before one tried to cut it. It tends to be very brittle compared to either Cherry or especially Maple.

Wood Automotive design Vehicle Flooring Wheel


Finally for this episode the engine cowl is glued in place having had to finesse the positioning in order to have the radiator square and centred once I glue it in. You can also see the inside of the mudguards in the parts photo and now glued into place in this final photo. A little story for you, when I made the first Model A these guard pieces proved to be a massive challenge. Personally I found Dan's plans confusing. Yet this time around its been straight forward. Funny what starts out as confusing becomes clear and relatively easy.
Playing with wood and continually learning and challenging ourselves is to me such a joy. Who would have thought that 59 years after doing woodwork at high school one of life's greatest pleasures was still mucking around with wood.
Top marks for an excellent build Kerry
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The build goes on

Now have head lights and side lights fitted. Running boards and front fenders completed and fitted too.

Vehicle Car Wheel Wood Automotive design


Looks like the hood is going to be a while. In transcribing some measurements I misread ⅜ as ⅛ and wondered why the fit was short. So back to the plans to check and sure enough …..$#^! So we cut another didn't we. Just puts back the ebonising process so the hood fit-up will be the last job now. Best get it correct though.

The other big job was the rear fenders getting finessed and fitted. Very happy with them and tail lights sorted too.

Vehicle Wood Automotive design Motor vehicle Toy


A tiny run in the Polyurethane on the rumble seat has finally been removed too.

Two more shots to close out this episode…...

Vehicle Wood Motor vehicle Automotive wheel system Watercraft


Hood Wood Motor vehicle Bumper Vehicle


Really enjoying seeing this lovely old car come to life. A personal opinion but I much prefer it with the maple panels than the first effort which were Jarrah.
Thanks for the comments and interest…...

Kerry
 

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The build goes on

Now have head lights and side lights fitted. Running boards and front fenders completed and fitted too.

Vehicle Car Wheel Wood Automotive design


Looks like the hood is going to be a while. In transcribing some measurements I misread ⅜ as ⅛ and wondered why the fit was short. So back to the plans to check and sure enough …..$#^! So we cut another didn't we. Just puts back the ebonising process so the hood fit-up will be the last job now. Best get it correct though.

The other big job was the rear fenders getting finessed and fitted. Very happy with them and tail lights sorted too.

Vehicle Wood Automotive design Motor vehicle Toy


A tiny run in the Polyurethane on the rumble seat has finally been removed too.

Two more shots to close out this episode…...

Vehicle Wood Motor vehicle Automotive wheel system Watercraft


Hood Wood Motor vehicle Bumper Vehicle


Really enjoying seeing this lovely old car come to life. A personal opinion but I much prefer it with the maple panels than the first effort which were Jarrah.
Thanks for the comments and interest…...

Kerry
I tried to translate …..$#^!, but could not find a good dutch world for it ;) I guess we don't know those words.

BTW Nice to follow this blog!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The build goes on

Now have head lights and side lights fitted. Running boards and front fenders completed and fitted too.

Vehicle Car Wheel Wood Automotive design


Looks like the hood is going to be a while. In transcribing some measurements I misread ⅜ as ⅛ and wondered why the fit was short. So back to the plans to check and sure enough …..$#^! So we cut another didn't we. Just puts back the ebonising process so the hood fit-up will be the last job now. Best get it correct though.

The other big job was the rear fenders getting finessed and fitted. Very happy with them and tail lights sorted too.

Vehicle Wood Automotive design Motor vehicle Toy


A tiny run in the Polyurethane on the rumble seat has finally been removed too.

Two more shots to close out this episode…...

Vehicle Wood Motor vehicle Automotive wheel system Watercraft


Hood Wood Motor vehicle Bumper Vehicle


Really enjoying seeing this lovely old car come to life. A personal opinion but I much prefer it with the maple panels than the first effort which were Jarrah.
Thanks for the comments and interest…...

Kerry
I tried to translate …..$#^!, but could not find a good dutch world for it ;) I guess we don t know those words.

BTW Nice to follow this blog!

- Dutchy
Yes it's a tricky little word…..
Where in the Netherlands are you? As a young man I lived in Den Helder for a couple of months.

Thanks Dutchy
 

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The build goes on

Now have head lights and side lights fitted. Running boards and front fenders completed and fitted too.

Vehicle Car Wheel Wood Automotive design


Looks like the hood is going to be a while. In transcribing some measurements I misread ⅜ as ⅛ and wondered why the fit was short. So back to the plans to check and sure enough …..$#^! So we cut another didn't we. Just puts back the ebonising process so the hood fit-up will be the last job now. Best get it correct though.

The other big job was the rear fenders getting finessed and fitted. Very happy with them and tail lights sorted too.

Vehicle Wood Automotive design Motor vehicle Toy


A tiny run in the Polyurethane on the rumble seat has finally been removed too.

Two more shots to close out this episode…...

Vehicle Wood Motor vehicle Automotive wheel system Watercraft


Hood Wood Motor vehicle Bumper Vehicle


Really enjoying seeing this lovely old car come to life. A personal opinion but I much prefer it with the maple panels than the first effort which were Jarrah.
Thanks for the comments and interest…...

Kerry
It's looking quite good, Kerry! Thanks for the detailed construction photos.
 

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