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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Milling the stock

I will begin this WIP series with a little history. I have been creating Intarsia since 1992 after reading an article in Wood magazine by Judy Gayle Roberts about how to do this beautiful woodworking artform. After doing a couple of her patterns, I started creating my own Intarsia patterns and began collecting many different woods to use in my art. Learning about the wide selection of natural colors and grains of the various woods and being able to incorporate them into my pieces is still the best part of the Intarsia process.One of the best ways that I have found to utilize these woods was to incorporate them into the tops of keepsake boxes which are functional , don't require a lot of wood and can be detailed and easily customized. Although I do 20-30 of my standard boxes every year it is the custom patterns that are the most fun to create.
For this WIP I will be designing a pattern for my wife's cousin who owns a Buffalo farm in North Carolina and wants the boxes to be auctioned at the Buffalo conventions that he will attend.
I will begin by showing the steps for making the box.

These boxes will be made from Black Walnut and will measure 6" x 8" x 3.5"

Here is the walnut stock that will be used.


A couple of passes through the jointer make it nice and flat.


The next step is to resaw to the rough thickness. (9/16")


2 passes through the planer gets me to 1/2" thick.


Once the stock has been sized to the correct thickness and height, it's over to the miter saw to cut the box sides to the correct lengths. I like to cut the sides of my boxes so that the grain runs sequentially around the exterior so I begin my miters by cutting one end at a 45 degree angle.


The inside dimensions of the box is 6" x 8" so after measuring and marking the first 8" side I do my miter cut. The piece of masking tape on the saw fence is used to mark the reference for the other 8" side.


Swinging the saw over and sliding the stock over I continue cutting until all 4 sides are cut to the proper length.




Once all of the box sides have been cut ,it's over to the router to route all of the grooves for the top and bottom back boards. I use a 1/4" router bit for the grooves
The bottom backer is 1/8" from the bottom of the box and 1/4" deep.




The top backer is 1/4" from the top and 1/4" deep.




These boxes also will include an accent strip groove which is located 1" from the bottom of the box and is 1/8" deep.



This concludes the milling process for the custom Buffalo Keepsake boxes. The next sequence will be the glue up process.
 

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Milling the stock

I will begin this WIP series with a little history. I have been creating Intarsia since 1992 after reading an article in Wood magazine by Judy Gayle Roberts about how to do this beautiful woodworking artform. After doing a couple of her patterns, I started creating my own Intarsia patterns and began collecting many different woods to use in my art. Learning about the wide selection of natural colors and grains of the various woods and being able to incorporate them into my pieces is still the best part of the Intarsia process.One of the best ways that I have found to utilize these woods was to incorporate them into the tops of keepsake boxes which are functional , don't require a lot of wood and can be detailed and easily customized. Although I do 20-30 of my standard boxes every year it is the custom patterns that are the most fun to create.
For this WIP I will be designing a pattern for my wife's cousin who owns a Buffalo farm in North Carolina and wants the boxes to be auctioned at the Buffalo conventions that he will attend.
I will begin by showing the steps for making the box.

These boxes will be made from Black Walnut and will measure 6" x 8" x 3.5"

Here is the walnut stock that will be used.


A couple of passes through the jointer make it nice and flat.


The next step is to resaw to the rough thickness. (9/16")


2 passes through the planer gets me to 1/2" thick.


Once the stock has been sized to the correct thickness and height, it's over to the miter saw to cut the box sides to the correct lengths. I like to cut the sides of my boxes so that the grain runs sequentially around the exterior so I begin my miters by cutting one end at a 45 degree angle.


The inside dimensions of the box is 6" x 8" so after measuring and marking the first 8" side I do my miter cut. The piece of masking tape on the saw fence is used to mark the reference for the other 8" side.


Swinging the saw over and sliding the stock over I continue cutting until all 4 sides are cut to the proper length.




Once all of the box sides have been cut ,it's over to the router to route all of the grooves for the top and bottom back boards. I use a 1/4" router bit for the grooves
The bottom backer is 1/8" from the bottom of the box and 1/4" deep.




The top backer is 1/4" from the top and 1/4" deep.




These boxes also will include an accent strip groove which is located 1" from the bottom of the box and is 1/8" deep.



This concludes the milling process for the custom Buffalo Keepsake boxes. The next sequence will be the glue up process.
Great step by step process so far. Thanks and will look forward to your next steps.
 

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Milling the stock

I will begin this WIP series with a little history. I have been creating Intarsia since 1992 after reading an article in Wood magazine by Judy Gayle Roberts about how to do this beautiful woodworking artform. After doing a couple of her patterns, I started creating my own Intarsia patterns and began collecting many different woods to use in my art. Learning about the wide selection of natural colors and grains of the various woods and being able to incorporate them into my pieces is still the best part of the Intarsia process.One of the best ways that I have found to utilize these woods was to incorporate them into the tops of keepsake boxes which are functional , don't require a lot of wood and can be detailed and easily customized. Although I do 20-30 of my standard boxes every year it is the custom patterns that are the most fun to create.
For this WIP I will be designing a pattern for my wife's cousin who owns a Buffalo farm in North Carolina and wants the boxes to be auctioned at the Buffalo conventions that he will attend.
I will begin by showing the steps for making the box.

These boxes will be made from Black Walnut and will measure 6" x 8" x 3.5"

Here is the walnut stock that will be used.


A couple of passes through the jointer make it nice and flat.


The next step is to resaw to the rough thickness. (9/16")


2 passes through the planer gets me to 1/2" thick.


Once the stock has been sized to the correct thickness and height, it's over to the miter saw to cut the box sides to the correct lengths. I like to cut the sides of my boxes so that the grain runs sequentially around the exterior so I begin my miters by cutting one end at a 45 degree angle.


The inside dimensions of the box is 6" x 8" so after measuring and marking the first 8" side I do my miter cut. The piece of masking tape on the saw fence is used to mark the reference for the other 8" side.


Swinging the saw over and sliding the stock over I continue cutting until all 4 sides are cut to the proper length.




Once all of the box sides have been cut ,it's over to the router to route all of the grooves for the top and bottom back boards. I use a 1/4" router bit for the grooves
The bottom backer is 1/8" from the bottom of the box and 1/4" deep.




The top backer is 1/4" from the top and 1/4" deep.




These boxes also will include an accent strip groove which is located 1" from the bottom of the box and is 1/8" deep.



This concludes the milling process for the custom Buffalo Keepsake boxes. The next sequence will be the glue up process.
This post reminded me of a question I've been dying to ask someone but keep forgetting….

Is there any difference between swinging the miter saw from left 45 to right 45 or flipping the stock over to accomplish the same thing? Is it a matter of preference, convenience, and shop layout, or is there a difference in the quality of the fit?
 

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Milling the stock

I will begin this WIP series with a little history. I have been creating Intarsia since 1992 after reading an article in Wood magazine by Judy Gayle Roberts about how to do this beautiful woodworking artform. After doing a couple of her patterns, I started creating my own Intarsia patterns and began collecting many different woods to use in my art. Learning about the wide selection of natural colors and grains of the various woods and being able to incorporate them into my pieces is still the best part of the Intarsia process.One of the best ways that I have found to utilize these woods was to incorporate them into the tops of keepsake boxes which are functional , don't require a lot of wood and can be detailed and easily customized. Although I do 20-30 of my standard boxes every year it is the custom patterns that are the most fun to create.
For this WIP I will be designing a pattern for my wife's cousin who owns a Buffalo farm in North Carolina and wants the boxes to be auctioned at the Buffalo conventions that he will attend.
I will begin by showing the steps for making the box.

These boxes will be made from Black Walnut and will measure 6" x 8" x 3.5"

Here is the walnut stock that will be used.


A couple of passes through the jointer make it nice and flat.


The next step is to resaw to the rough thickness. (9/16")


2 passes through the planer gets me to 1/2" thick.


Once the stock has been sized to the correct thickness and height, it's over to the miter saw to cut the box sides to the correct lengths. I like to cut the sides of my boxes so that the grain runs sequentially around the exterior so I begin my miters by cutting one end at a 45 degree angle.


The inside dimensions of the box is 6" x 8" so after measuring and marking the first 8" side I do my miter cut. The piece of masking tape on the saw fence is used to mark the reference for the other 8" side.


Swinging the saw over and sliding the stock over I continue cutting until all 4 sides are cut to the proper length.




Once all of the box sides have been cut ,it's over to the router to route all of the grooves for the top and bottom back boards. I use a 1/4" router bit for the grooves
The bottom backer is 1/8" from the bottom of the box and 1/4" deep.




The top backer is 1/4" from the top and 1/4" deep.




These boxes also will include an accent strip groove which is located 1" from the bottom of the box and is 1/8" deep.



This concludes the milling process for the custom Buffalo Keepsake boxes. The next sequence will be the glue up process.
A good beginning look forward to more.

Bret
I don't know about others but I like to swing the miter around . You can flip the stock over and as long as your saw is accurate (most miters are not) then it will work fine.
 

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Milling the stock

I will begin this WIP series with a little history. I have been creating Intarsia since 1992 after reading an article in Wood magazine by Judy Gayle Roberts about how to do this beautiful woodworking artform. After doing a couple of her patterns, I started creating my own Intarsia patterns and began collecting many different woods to use in my art. Learning about the wide selection of natural colors and grains of the various woods and being able to incorporate them into my pieces is still the best part of the Intarsia process.One of the best ways that I have found to utilize these woods was to incorporate them into the tops of keepsake boxes which are functional , don't require a lot of wood and can be detailed and easily customized. Although I do 20-30 of my standard boxes every year it is the custom patterns that are the most fun to create.
For this WIP I will be designing a pattern for my wife's cousin who owns a Buffalo farm in North Carolina and wants the boxes to be auctioned at the Buffalo conventions that he will attend.
I will begin by showing the steps for making the box.

These boxes will be made from Black Walnut and will measure 6" x 8" x 3.5"

Here is the walnut stock that will be used.


A couple of passes through the jointer make it nice and flat.


The next step is to resaw to the rough thickness. (9/16")


2 passes through the planer gets me to 1/2" thick.


Once the stock has been sized to the correct thickness and height, it's over to the miter saw to cut the box sides to the correct lengths. I like to cut the sides of my boxes so that the grain runs sequentially around the exterior so I begin my miters by cutting one end at a 45 degree angle.


The inside dimensions of the box is 6" x 8" so after measuring and marking the first 8" side I do my miter cut. The piece of masking tape on the saw fence is used to mark the reference for the other 8" side.


Swinging the saw over and sliding the stock over I continue cutting until all 4 sides are cut to the proper length.




Once all of the box sides have been cut ,it's over to the router to route all of the grooves for the top and bottom back boards. I use a 1/4" router bit for the grooves
The bottom backer is 1/8" from the bottom of the box and 1/4" deep.




The top backer is 1/4" from the top and 1/4" deep.




These boxes also will include an accent strip groove which is located 1" from the bottom of the box and is 1/8" deep.



This concludes the milling process for the custom Buffalo Keepsake boxes. The next sequence will be the glue up process.
This should be fun to watch!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Milling the stock

I will begin this WIP series with a little history. I have been creating Intarsia since 1992 after reading an article in Wood magazine by Judy Gayle Roberts about how to do this beautiful woodworking artform. After doing a couple of her patterns, I started creating my own Intarsia patterns and began collecting many different woods to use in my art. Learning about the wide selection of natural colors and grains of the various woods and being able to incorporate them into my pieces is still the best part of the Intarsia process.One of the best ways that I have found to utilize these woods was to incorporate them into the tops of keepsake boxes which are functional , don't require a lot of wood and can be detailed and easily customized. Although I do 20-30 of my standard boxes every year it is the custom patterns that are the most fun to create.
For this WIP I will be designing a pattern for my wife's cousin who owns a Buffalo farm in North Carolina and wants the boxes to be auctioned at the Buffalo conventions that he will attend.
I will begin by showing the steps for making the box.

These boxes will be made from Black Walnut and will measure 6" x 8" x 3.5"

Here is the walnut stock that will be used.


A couple of passes through the jointer make it nice and flat.


The next step is to resaw to the rough thickness. (9/16")


2 passes through the planer gets me to 1/2" thick.


Once the stock has been sized to the correct thickness and height, it's over to the miter saw to cut the box sides to the correct lengths. I like to cut the sides of my boxes so that the grain runs sequentially around the exterior so I begin my miters by cutting one end at a 45 degree angle.


The inside dimensions of the box is 6" x 8" so after measuring and marking the first 8" side I do my miter cut. The piece of masking tape on the saw fence is used to mark the reference for the other 8" side.


Swinging the saw over and sliding the stock over I continue cutting until all 4 sides are cut to the proper length.




Once all of the box sides have been cut ,it's over to the router to route all of the grooves for the top and bottom back boards. I use a 1/4" router bit for the grooves
The bottom backer is 1/8" from the bottom of the box and 1/4" deep.




The top backer is 1/4" from the top and 1/4" deep.




These boxes also will include an accent strip groove which is located 1" from the bottom of the box and is 1/8" deep.



This concludes the milling process for the custom Buffalo Keepsake boxes. The next sequence will be the glue up process.
The main reason that I swing the saw from side to side is because the stock is sequenced so that the grain runs all the way around the corners. Also I have adjusted the saw so that the miters are true 45 degree left and right.
 

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Milling the stock

I will begin this WIP series with a little history. I have been creating Intarsia since 1992 after reading an article in Wood magazine by Judy Gayle Roberts about how to do this beautiful woodworking artform. After doing a couple of her patterns, I started creating my own Intarsia patterns and began collecting many different woods to use in my art. Learning about the wide selection of natural colors and grains of the various woods and being able to incorporate them into my pieces is still the best part of the Intarsia process.One of the best ways that I have found to utilize these woods was to incorporate them into the tops of keepsake boxes which are functional , don't require a lot of wood and can be detailed and easily customized. Although I do 20-30 of my standard boxes every year it is the custom patterns that are the most fun to create.
For this WIP I will be designing a pattern for my wife's cousin who owns a Buffalo farm in North Carolina and wants the boxes to be auctioned at the Buffalo conventions that he will attend.
I will begin by showing the steps for making the box.

These boxes will be made from Black Walnut and will measure 6" x 8" x 3.5"

Here is the walnut stock that will be used.


A couple of passes through the jointer make it nice and flat.


The next step is to resaw to the rough thickness. (9/16")


2 passes through the planer gets me to 1/2" thick.


Once the stock has been sized to the correct thickness and height, it's over to the miter saw to cut the box sides to the correct lengths. I like to cut the sides of my boxes so that the grain runs sequentially around the exterior so I begin my miters by cutting one end at a 45 degree angle.


The inside dimensions of the box is 6" x 8" so after measuring and marking the first 8" side I do my miter cut. The piece of masking tape on the saw fence is used to mark the reference for the other 8" side.


Swinging the saw over and sliding the stock over I continue cutting until all 4 sides are cut to the proper length.




Once all of the box sides have been cut ,it's over to the router to route all of the grooves for the top and bottom back boards. I use a 1/4" router bit for the grooves
The bottom backer is 1/8" from the bottom of the box and 1/4" deep.




The top backer is 1/4" from the top and 1/4" deep.




These boxes also will include an accent strip groove which is located 1" from the bottom of the box and is 1/8" deep.



This concludes the milling process for the custom Buffalo Keepsake boxes. The next sequence will be the glue up process.
I've always done the same-moving the saw, but was curious as to whether it would make a miter joint fit more preciesely to leave the saw fixed and move the stock. Doesn't sound like there's enough difference (if any) to justify the broken light fixtures. :)

I too am looking forward to seeing how this comes out. I think most of my winter projects will be boxes, so all this recent activity has shown me a bunch of construction methods that I hadn't though to try yet.
 

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Milling the stock

I will begin this WIP series with a little history. I have been creating Intarsia since 1992 after reading an article in Wood magazine by Judy Gayle Roberts about how to do this beautiful woodworking artform. After doing a couple of her patterns, I started creating my own Intarsia patterns and began collecting many different woods to use in my art. Learning about the wide selection of natural colors and grains of the various woods and being able to incorporate them into my pieces is still the best part of the Intarsia process.One of the best ways that I have found to utilize these woods was to incorporate them into the tops of keepsake boxes which are functional , don't require a lot of wood and can be detailed and easily customized. Although I do 20-30 of my standard boxes every year it is the custom patterns that are the most fun to create.
For this WIP I will be designing a pattern for my wife's cousin who owns a Buffalo farm in North Carolina and wants the boxes to be auctioned at the Buffalo conventions that he will attend.
I will begin by showing the steps for making the box.

These boxes will be made from Black Walnut and will measure 6" x 8" x 3.5"

Here is the walnut stock that will be used.


A couple of passes through the jointer make it nice and flat.


The next step is to resaw to the rough thickness. (9/16")


2 passes through the planer gets me to 1/2" thick.


Once the stock has been sized to the correct thickness and height, it's over to the miter saw to cut the box sides to the correct lengths. I like to cut the sides of my boxes so that the grain runs sequentially around the exterior so I begin my miters by cutting one end at a 45 degree angle.


The inside dimensions of the box is 6" x 8" so after measuring and marking the first 8" side I do my miter cut. The piece of masking tape on the saw fence is used to mark the reference for the other 8" side.


Swinging the saw over and sliding the stock over I continue cutting until all 4 sides are cut to the proper length.




Once all of the box sides have been cut ,it's over to the router to route all of the grooves for the top and bottom back boards. I use a 1/4" router bit for the grooves
The bottom backer is 1/8" from the bottom of the box and 1/4" deep.




The top backer is 1/4" from the top and 1/4" deep.




These boxes also will include an accent strip groove which is located 1" from the bottom of the box and is 1/8" deep.



This concludes the milling process for the custom Buffalo Keepsake boxes. The next sequence will be the glue up process.
Mike, this is a nice tutorial. The process that you are using is clearly documented. Thanks for taking the time to do this and I am looking forward to the next installment.
 

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Milling the stock

I will begin this WIP series with a little history. I have been creating Intarsia since 1992 after reading an article in Wood magazine by Judy Gayle Roberts about how to do this beautiful woodworking artform. After doing a couple of her patterns, I started creating my own Intarsia patterns and began collecting many different woods to use in my art. Learning about the wide selection of natural colors and grains of the various woods and being able to incorporate them into my pieces is still the best part of the Intarsia process.One of the best ways that I have found to utilize these woods was to incorporate them into the tops of keepsake boxes which are functional , don't require a lot of wood and can be detailed and easily customized. Although I do 20-30 of my standard boxes every year it is the custom patterns that are the most fun to create.
For this WIP I will be designing a pattern for my wife's cousin who owns a Buffalo farm in North Carolina and wants the boxes to be auctioned at the Buffalo conventions that he will attend.
I will begin by showing the steps for making the box.

These boxes will be made from Black Walnut and will measure 6" x 8" x 3.5"

Here is the walnut stock that will be used.


A couple of passes through the jointer make it nice and flat.


The next step is to resaw to the rough thickness. (9/16")


2 passes through the planer gets me to 1/2" thick.


Once the stock has been sized to the correct thickness and height, it's over to the miter saw to cut the box sides to the correct lengths. I like to cut the sides of my boxes so that the grain runs sequentially around the exterior so I begin my miters by cutting one end at a 45 degree angle.


The inside dimensions of the box is 6" x 8" so after measuring and marking the first 8" side I do my miter cut. The piece of masking tape on the saw fence is used to mark the reference for the other 8" side.


Swinging the saw over and sliding the stock over I continue cutting until all 4 sides are cut to the proper length.




Once all of the box sides have been cut ,it's over to the router to route all of the grooves for the top and bottom back boards. I use a 1/4" router bit for the grooves
The bottom backer is 1/8" from the bottom of the box and 1/4" deep.




The top backer is 1/4" from the top and 1/4" deep.




These boxes also will include an accent strip groove which is located 1" from the bottom of the box and is 1/8" deep.



This concludes the milling process for the custom Buffalo Keepsake boxes. The next sequence will be the glue up process.
Great job and I look forward to the rest of this tutorial. I Just have to sit down and try one of these Intarsia projects one of these days. I get Judy's monthly newletters and enjoy reading them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Box Glue-up

In my first installment I showed the steps to cut and prep the stock for the custom keepsake box.
This installment shows the steps to glue -up the box and cut the lid.
I begin by gluing in the accent strips on all of the box sides. I am using Holly strips that I sized 1/4" wide by 1/8" thick


I use CA glue and tap them in place.


Once the glue has set up I use a small flex-blade saw to trim the ends flush with the miters.


I use a sanding block to sand the strips flush with the box side.


Now is also the time to sand all of the insides of the box sides up to 220 grit.


In this next photo, I'm using my rotary tool with a 5/64" high speed bit to make small holes in the miters to give the glue joint extra strength being careful not to drill through the side and not drilling 3/4" down from the top of the box where the lid will be separated.


I've cut the backer boards to fit in the grooves and do a dry fit to make sure all of the miters fit tight and the box is square.


Now comes the fun part. Laying all of the box sides in the right sequence against a straight edge I tape the ends together using packing tape stretched tight to pull the miters together.


Carefully flipping the box sides over I apply glue to the backer grooves and to the miters.


Setting the top and bottom backers in place I now pull the sides together and tape the last corner together with packing tape.


Squaring the glued box with a framing square I pull the corners tight with packing tape stretched diagonally on the top and bottom of the box.


After the glue has dried and the tape has been removed I sand the sides of the box to 220 grit.


In the next photos, I have set the fence of the bandsaw 3/4" from the blade and have placed the top of the box against the fence. Saw through until the lid is separated.




Lid separated from box


Over to the router to round off the top and bottom edges of the box using a 1/4" roundover bit.


Remove saw marks on the inside edges of the box and lid by sanding with 100grit sandpaper on a flat surface.


Box is ready for finishing and hinges-but not yet.


My next entry will be designing the pattern and starting the intarsia.
 

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Box Glue-up

In my first installment I showed the steps to cut and prep the stock for the custom keepsake box.
This installment shows the steps to glue -up the box and cut the lid.
I begin by gluing in the accent strips on all of the box sides. I am using Holly strips that I sized 1/4" wide by 1/8" thick


I use CA glue and tap them in place.


Once the glue has set up I use a small flex-blade saw to trim the ends flush with the miters.


I use a sanding block to sand the strips flush with the box side.


Now is also the time to sand all of the insides of the box sides up to 220 grit.


In this next photo, I'm using my rotary tool with a 5/64" high speed bit to make small holes in the miters to give the glue joint extra strength being careful not to drill through the side and not drilling 3/4" down from the top of the box where the lid will be separated.


I've cut the backer boards to fit in the grooves and do a dry fit to make sure all of the miters fit tight and the box is square.


Now comes the fun part. Laying all of the box sides in the right sequence against a straight edge I tape the ends together using packing tape stretched tight to pull the miters together.


Carefully flipping the box sides over I apply glue to the backer grooves and to the miters.


Setting the top and bottom backers in place I now pull the sides together and tape the last corner together with packing tape.


Squaring the glued box with a framing square I pull the corners tight with packing tape stretched diagonally on the top and bottom of the box.


After the glue has dried and the tape has been removed I sand the sides of the box to 220 grit.


In the next photos, I have set the fence of the bandsaw 3/4" from the blade and have placed the top of the box against the fence. Saw through until the lid is separated.




Lid separated from box


Over to the router to round off the top and bottom edges of the box using a 1/4" roundover bit.


Remove saw marks on the inside edges of the box and lid by sanding with 100grit sandpaper on a flat surface.


Box is ready for finishing and hinges-but not yet.


My next entry will be designing the pattern and starting the intarsia.
nice inlay what kind of wood is the box and inlay the inlay looks like holly and the box walnut?
 

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Box Glue-up

In my first installment I showed the steps to cut and prep the stock for the custom keepsake box.
This installment shows the steps to glue -up the box and cut the lid.
I begin by gluing in the accent strips on all of the box sides. I am using Holly strips that I sized 1/4" wide by 1/8" thick


I use CA glue and tap them in place.


Once the glue has set up I use a small flex-blade saw to trim the ends flush with the miters.


I use a sanding block to sand the strips flush with the box side.


Now is also the time to sand all of the insides of the box sides up to 220 grit.


In this next photo, I'm using my rotary tool with a 5/64" high speed bit to make small holes in the miters to give the glue joint extra strength being careful not to drill through the side and not drilling 3/4" down from the top of the box where the lid will be separated.


I've cut the backer boards to fit in the grooves and do a dry fit to make sure all of the miters fit tight and the box is square.


Now comes the fun part. Laying all of the box sides in the right sequence against a straight edge I tape the ends together using packing tape stretched tight to pull the miters together.


Carefully flipping the box sides over I apply glue to the backer grooves and to the miters.


Setting the top and bottom backers in place I now pull the sides together and tape the last corner together with packing tape.


Squaring the glued box with a framing square I pull the corners tight with packing tape stretched diagonally on the top and bottom of the box.


After the glue has dried and the tape has been removed I sand the sides of the box to 220 grit.


In the next photos, I have set the fence of the bandsaw 3/4" from the blade and have placed the top of the box against the fence. Saw through until the lid is separated.




Lid separated from box


Over to the router to round off the top and bottom edges of the box using a 1/4" roundover bit.


Remove saw marks on the inside edges of the box and lid by sanding with 100grit sandpaper on a flat surface.


Box is ready for finishing and hinges-but not yet.


My next entry will be designing the pattern and starting the intarsia.
i am confused about the dimpling of the end grain????
 

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Box Glue-up

In my first installment I showed the steps to cut and prep the stock for the custom keepsake box.
This installment shows the steps to glue -up the box and cut the lid.
I begin by gluing in the accent strips on all of the box sides. I am using Holly strips that I sized 1/4" wide by 1/8" thick


I use CA glue and tap them in place.


Once the glue has set up I use a small flex-blade saw to trim the ends flush with the miters.


I use a sanding block to sand the strips flush with the box side.


Now is also the time to sand all of the insides of the box sides up to 220 grit.


In this next photo, I'm using my rotary tool with a 5/64" high speed bit to make small holes in the miters to give the glue joint extra strength being careful not to drill through the side and not drilling 3/4" down from the top of the box where the lid will be separated.


I've cut the backer boards to fit in the grooves and do a dry fit to make sure all of the miters fit tight and the box is square.


Now comes the fun part. Laying all of the box sides in the right sequence against a straight edge I tape the ends together using packing tape stretched tight to pull the miters together.


Carefully flipping the box sides over I apply glue to the backer grooves and to the miters.


Setting the top and bottom backers in place I now pull the sides together and tape the last corner together with packing tape.


Squaring the glued box with a framing square I pull the corners tight with packing tape stretched diagonally on the top and bottom of the box.


After the glue has dried and the tape has been removed I sand the sides of the box to 220 grit.


In the next photos, I have set the fence of the bandsaw 3/4" from the blade and have placed the top of the box against the fence. Saw through until the lid is separated.




Lid separated from box


Over to the router to round off the top and bottom edges of the box using a 1/4" roundover bit.


Remove saw marks on the inside edges of the box and lid by sanding with 100grit sandpaper on a flat surface.


Box is ready for finishing and hinges-but not yet.


My next entry will be designing the pattern and starting the intarsia.
i love this series…always enjoy watching another jock create there projects…always things to learn…thankyou…look forward to the next step….
 

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Box Glue-up

In my first installment I showed the steps to cut and prep the stock for the custom keepsake box.
This installment shows the steps to glue -up the box and cut the lid.
I begin by gluing in the accent strips on all of the box sides. I am using Holly strips that I sized 1/4" wide by 1/8" thick


I use CA glue and tap them in place.


Once the glue has set up I use a small flex-blade saw to trim the ends flush with the miters.


I use a sanding block to sand the strips flush with the box side.


Now is also the time to sand all of the insides of the box sides up to 220 grit.


In this next photo, I'm using my rotary tool with a 5/64" high speed bit to make small holes in the miters to give the glue joint extra strength being careful not to drill through the side and not drilling 3/4" down from the top of the box where the lid will be separated.


I've cut the backer boards to fit in the grooves and do a dry fit to make sure all of the miters fit tight and the box is square.


Now comes the fun part. Laying all of the box sides in the right sequence against a straight edge I tape the ends together using packing tape stretched tight to pull the miters together.


Carefully flipping the box sides over I apply glue to the backer grooves and to the miters.


Setting the top and bottom backers in place I now pull the sides together and tape the last corner together with packing tape.


Squaring the glued box with a framing square I pull the corners tight with packing tape stretched diagonally on the top and bottom of the box.


After the glue has dried and the tape has been removed I sand the sides of the box to 220 grit.


In the next photos, I have set the fence of the bandsaw 3/4" from the blade and have placed the top of the box against the fence. Saw through until the lid is separated.




Lid separated from box


Over to the router to round off the top and bottom edges of the box using a 1/4" roundover bit.


Remove saw marks on the inside edges of the box and lid by sanding with 100grit sandpaper on a flat surface.


Box is ready for finishing and hinges-but not yet.


My next entry will be designing the pattern and starting the intarsia.
good blog ,

i do the same thing ,
except i do all the exterior work and the finishing ,
before i cut the box open .
that way if the finish is screwed up i can sand it off and try again .
i just put tape to the relevant parts where they will get scratched
as they go thru the bandsaw .
 

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Box Glue-up

In my first installment I showed the steps to cut and prep the stock for the custom keepsake box.
This installment shows the steps to glue -up the box and cut the lid.
I begin by gluing in the accent strips on all of the box sides. I am using Holly strips that I sized 1/4" wide by 1/8" thick


I use CA glue and tap them in place.


Once the glue has set up I use a small flex-blade saw to trim the ends flush with the miters.


I use a sanding block to sand the strips flush with the box side.


Now is also the time to sand all of the insides of the box sides up to 220 grit.


In this next photo, I'm using my rotary tool with a 5/64" high speed bit to make small holes in the miters to give the glue joint extra strength being careful not to drill through the side and not drilling 3/4" down from the top of the box where the lid will be separated.


I've cut the backer boards to fit in the grooves and do a dry fit to make sure all of the miters fit tight and the box is square.


Now comes the fun part. Laying all of the box sides in the right sequence against a straight edge I tape the ends together using packing tape stretched tight to pull the miters together.


Carefully flipping the box sides over I apply glue to the backer grooves and to the miters.


Setting the top and bottom backers in place I now pull the sides together and tape the last corner together with packing tape.


Squaring the glued box with a framing square I pull the corners tight with packing tape stretched diagonally on the top and bottom of the box.


After the glue has dried and the tape has been removed I sand the sides of the box to 220 grit.


In the next photos, I have set the fence of the bandsaw 3/4" from the blade and have placed the top of the box against the fence. Saw through until the lid is separated.




Lid separated from box


Over to the router to round off the top and bottom edges of the box using a 1/4" roundover bit.


Remove saw marks on the inside edges of the box and lid by sanding with 100grit sandpaper on a flat surface.


Box is ready for finishing and hinges-but not yet.


My next entry will be designing the pattern and starting the intarsia.
This is an awesome tutorial, thanks for taking the time to do this!
 

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118,619 Posts
Box Glue-up

In my first installment I showed the steps to cut and prep the stock for the custom keepsake box.
This installment shows the steps to glue -up the box and cut the lid.
I begin by gluing in the accent strips on all of the box sides. I am using Holly strips that I sized 1/4" wide by 1/8" thick


I use CA glue and tap them in place.


Once the glue has set up I use a small flex-blade saw to trim the ends flush with the miters.


I use a sanding block to sand the strips flush with the box side.


Now is also the time to sand all of the insides of the box sides up to 220 grit.


In this next photo, I'm using my rotary tool with a 5/64" high speed bit to make small holes in the miters to give the glue joint extra strength being careful not to drill through the side and not drilling 3/4" down from the top of the box where the lid will be separated.


I've cut the backer boards to fit in the grooves and do a dry fit to make sure all of the miters fit tight and the box is square.


Now comes the fun part. Laying all of the box sides in the right sequence against a straight edge I tape the ends together using packing tape stretched tight to pull the miters together.


Carefully flipping the box sides over I apply glue to the backer grooves and to the miters.


Setting the top and bottom backers in place I now pull the sides together and tape the last corner together with packing tape.


Squaring the glued box with a framing square I pull the corners tight with packing tape stretched diagonally on the top and bottom of the box.


After the glue has dried and the tape has been removed I sand the sides of the box to 220 grit.


In the next photos, I have set the fence of the bandsaw 3/4" from the blade and have placed the top of the box against the fence. Saw through until the lid is separated.




Lid separated from box


Over to the router to round off the top and bottom edges of the box using a 1/4" roundover bit.


Remove saw marks on the inside edges of the box and lid by sanding with 100grit sandpaper on a flat surface.


Box is ready for finishing and hinges-but not yet.


My next entry will be designing the pattern and starting the intarsia.
Super Blog Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Box Glue-up

In my first installment I showed the steps to cut and prep the stock for the custom keepsake box.
This installment shows the steps to glue -up the box and cut the lid.
I begin by gluing in the accent strips on all of the box sides. I am using Holly strips that I sized 1/4" wide by 1/8" thick


I use CA glue and tap them in place.


Once the glue has set up I use a small flex-blade saw to trim the ends flush with the miters.


I use a sanding block to sand the strips flush with the box side.


Now is also the time to sand all of the insides of the box sides up to 220 grit.


In this next photo, I'm using my rotary tool with a 5/64" high speed bit to make small holes in the miters to give the glue joint extra strength being careful not to drill through the side and not drilling 3/4" down from the top of the box where the lid will be separated.


I've cut the backer boards to fit in the grooves and do a dry fit to make sure all of the miters fit tight and the box is square.


Now comes the fun part. Laying all of the box sides in the right sequence against a straight edge I tape the ends together using packing tape stretched tight to pull the miters together.


Carefully flipping the box sides over I apply glue to the backer grooves and to the miters.


Setting the top and bottom backers in place I now pull the sides together and tape the last corner together with packing tape.


Squaring the glued box with a framing square I pull the corners tight with packing tape stretched diagonally on the top and bottom of the box.


After the glue has dried and the tape has been removed I sand the sides of the box to 220 grit.


In the next photos, I have set the fence of the bandsaw 3/4" from the blade and have placed the top of the box against the fence. Saw through until the lid is separated.




Lid separated from box


Over to the router to round off the top and bottom edges of the box using a 1/4" roundover bit.


Remove saw marks on the inside edges of the box and lid by sanding with 100grit sandpaper on a flat surface.


Box is ready for finishing and hinges-but not yet.


My next entry will be designing the pattern and starting the intarsia.
Thanks for the nice comments guys.
To Ike-you are correct-holly inlays, walnut box
To partridge-end grain glue-ups are typically weak so by adding the little holes in the miters it gives the glue more area to hold on to.
 

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2,838 Posts
Box Glue-up

In my first installment I showed the steps to cut and prep the stock for the custom keepsake box.
This installment shows the steps to glue -up the box and cut the lid.
I begin by gluing in the accent strips on all of the box sides. I am using Holly strips that I sized 1/4" wide by 1/8" thick


I use CA glue and tap them in place.


Once the glue has set up I use a small flex-blade saw to trim the ends flush with the miters.


I use a sanding block to sand the strips flush with the box side.


Now is also the time to sand all of the insides of the box sides up to 220 grit.


In this next photo, I'm using my rotary tool with a 5/64" high speed bit to make small holes in the miters to give the glue joint extra strength being careful not to drill through the side and not drilling 3/4" down from the top of the box where the lid will be separated.


I've cut the backer boards to fit in the grooves and do a dry fit to make sure all of the miters fit tight and the box is square.


Now comes the fun part. Laying all of the box sides in the right sequence against a straight edge I tape the ends together using packing tape stretched tight to pull the miters together.


Carefully flipping the box sides over I apply glue to the backer grooves and to the miters.


Setting the top and bottom backers in place I now pull the sides together and tape the last corner together with packing tape.


Squaring the glued box with a framing square I pull the corners tight with packing tape stretched diagonally on the top and bottom of the box.


After the glue has dried and the tape has been removed I sand the sides of the box to 220 grit.


In the next photos, I have set the fence of the bandsaw 3/4" from the blade and have placed the top of the box against the fence. Saw through until the lid is separated.




Lid separated from box


Over to the router to round off the top and bottom edges of the box using a 1/4" roundover bit.


Remove saw marks on the inside edges of the box and lid by sanding with 100grit sandpaper on a flat surface.


Box is ready for finishing and hinges-but not yet.


My next entry will be designing the pattern and starting the intarsia.
Very informative blog Mike. Your blog is very easy to follow along. Good job. Looking forward to next one.
 

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Registered
Joined
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247 Posts
Box Glue-up

In my first installment I showed the steps to cut and prep the stock for the custom keepsake box.
This installment shows the steps to glue -up the box and cut the lid.
I begin by gluing in the accent strips on all of the box sides. I am using Holly strips that I sized 1/4" wide by 1/8" thick


I use CA glue and tap them in place.


Once the glue has set up I use a small flex-blade saw to trim the ends flush with the miters.


I use a sanding block to sand the strips flush with the box side.


Now is also the time to sand all of the insides of the box sides up to 220 grit.


In this next photo, I'm using my rotary tool with a 5/64" high speed bit to make small holes in the miters to give the glue joint extra strength being careful not to drill through the side and not drilling 3/4" down from the top of the box where the lid will be separated.


I've cut the backer boards to fit in the grooves and do a dry fit to make sure all of the miters fit tight and the box is square.


Now comes the fun part. Laying all of the box sides in the right sequence against a straight edge I tape the ends together using packing tape stretched tight to pull the miters together.


Carefully flipping the box sides over I apply glue to the backer grooves and to the miters.


Setting the top and bottom backers in place I now pull the sides together and tape the last corner together with packing tape.


Squaring the glued box with a framing square I pull the corners tight with packing tape stretched diagonally on the top and bottom of the box.


After the glue has dried and the tape has been removed I sand the sides of the box to 220 grit.


In the next photos, I have set the fence of the bandsaw 3/4" from the blade and have placed the top of the box against the fence. Saw through until the lid is separated.




Lid separated from box


Over to the router to round off the top and bottom edges of the box using a 1/4" roundover bit.


Remove saw marks on the inside edges of the box and lid by sanding with 100grit sandpaper on a flat surface.


Box is ready for finishing and hinges-but not yet.


My next entry will be designing the pattern and starting the intarsia.
can not wait for the intarsia piece. I have done a couple but love seeing other.
 

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Registered
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14,490 Posts
Box Glue-up

In my first installment I showed the steps to cut and prep the stock for the custom keepsake box.
This installment shows the steps to glue -up the box and cut the lid.
I begin by gluing in the accent strips on all of the box sides. I am using Holly strips that I sized 1/4" wide by 1/8" thick


I use CA glue and tap them in place.


Once the glue has set up I use a small flex-blade saw to trim the ends flush with the miters.


I use a sanding block to sand the strips flush with the box side.


Now is also the time to sand all of the insides of the box sides up to 220 grit.


In this next photo, I'm using my rotary tool with a 5/64" high speed bit to make small holes in the miters to give the glue joint extra strength being careful not to drill through the side and not drilling 3/4" down from the top of the box where the lid will be separated.


I've cut the backer boards to fit in the grooves and do a dry fit to make sure all of the miters fit tight and the box is square.


Now comes the fun part. Laying all of the box sides in the right sequence against a straight edge I tape the ends together using packing tape stretched tight to pull the miters together.


Carefully flipping the box sides over I apply glue to the backer grooves and to the miters.


Setting the top and bottom backers in place I now pull the sides together and tape the last corner together with packing tape.


Squaring the glued box with a framing square I pull the corners tight with packing tape stretched diagonally on the top and bottom of the box.


After the glue has dried and the tape has been removed I sand the sides of the box to 220 grit.


In the next photos, I have set the fence of the bandsaw 3/4" from the blade and have placed the top of the box against the fence. Saw through until the lid is separated.




Lid separated from box


Over to the router to round off the top and bottom edges of the box using a 1/4" roundover bit.


Remove saw marks on the inside edges of the box and lid by sanding with 100grit sandpaper on a flat surface.


Box is ready for finishing and hinges-but not yet.


My next entry will be designing the pattern and starting the intarsia.
GOOD ONE
 
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