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Discussion Starter · #81 ·
Rain Rain go Away - Rail Rail Done Today

July, and it was pouring rain here in Boston, MA. for the past week. go figure. (although today it cleared out which is really nice). but enough about the weather (as if this will stop us).

After completing the basic construction for the leg ends last installment. It was now the time to connect those with rails. The rails are 45" long with 2 1/2" tenon sticking on each side (to a total length of 50" - do the math). They are made of 2 2×4 that were jointed/planed as little as possible (to keep as much material, but get it flat) laminated together. All the tenons in this table are rounded off with chisels since I was too lazy to square off the mortises, and since there wasn't really any visual need to square them, I kept it all round - fresh off the drill press.
Automotive tire Wood Gas Engineering Machine


As you can see, the front rail is extended with a 45 degree tongue that will hold a sliding vise later on (and perhaps a sliding deadman sooner).

the tenons were cut oversized with the bandsaw, and fitted with a block plane and chisels. last time I did this I felt like It would have been easier if I had a shoulder plane - but this time around it seems that using a block plane with a wide blade, makes more sense, and easier to overlap the strokes as opposed to a narrow shoulder blade- the only thing I'm left with at the end is a narrow strip near the shoulder that is easily cleaned with a chisel.

Now that the rails fit in the legs, it's time to bore them for the bolts as I would like to be able to take this apart one day when I need to move it elsewhere.

I bored a 3/8" hole in the middle of the leg mortise and counter bored it from the outside (to conceal the bolt head). I then placed the rail in the mortise, and using a 1' long, 3/8" drill bit bored the rail while maintaining alignment with the hole in the leg:
Pneumatic tool Wood Handheld power drill Automotive tire Drilling


I haven't seen anyone post anything online regarding this method of boring holes for leg bolts, so I figured I'd shed some light on the way I'm doing it. I'm using long drill bits for this purpose. these can be found in electric supplier, or might even be at the box-office-stores in the electric isle. these are specialty bits designed to drill inside walls between floors without having to break open the sheetrock. they come in length from 1' to 6', some more flexible, some less. for boring leg bolts, I use the shorter type (1 foot) and make sure they are not flexible so that they'll keep a straight aligned line with the leg hole, and not flex sideways:
Pneumatic tool Handheld power drill Drill Tool Plant


Once the legs were bored to take the bolts, I used to drill press to bore a perpendicular pocket hole to take the nut, and a washer. I didn't really care much for the look of this hole as eventually it'll be hidden under a shelf, so I didn't put too much time into making it pretty- the only things that were looked for were functionality - keeping the shoulder of the hole flat and square to the rail (where the washer will be), and making sure the hole is small enough so it doesn't take too much material off, but yet large enough to take the washer, and have some room to reach the nut. I actually made it large enough for future possibility of putting cross grain piece of wood in there if the washer is not enough. but for now - the washer is all I'm going to place in there:
Wood Tool Drilling Flooring Gas


I must say that the Drill press, and the Table I made for it played a major role in this project, and both performed really well and made things go smoothly and repeatedly, both on the horizontal plane, and on the vertical as well.

After all of that was done, I did some cleaning (scraping). I added masonite layer to the bottom of each leg (since I'm not too excited about having end-grain sitting on the concrete floor here), and chamfered the edges. put it all together for dry fitting, and since I really couldn't resist - I man handled the bowling alley behemoth onto the legs.

I was able to use the floor and the legs as pivot points to lift the top on the legs, but there's absolutely no way I can lift this thing up in the air - not even 1/8" off the floor… I'm not really sure how I'll take this thing off to finish the legs as they are not glued yet, and I still need to mount the vise hardware in the right leg assembly. but for now - I couldn't resist the chance to get a glimpse of how this thing will eventually look. to be honest, I didn't realize how big this thing is going to be (80"x30")... this is some major real estate to work on compared to my current 60"x24" workbench (which works great). I'll just have to use some temporary staging while I take each separate leg end to work on… no worries.
Wood Table Floor Wood stain Tool


oh well… time to get some rest as I conjure how to tackle the next step - getting those nails out… so not looking forward to this.
Thanks Jon - I appreciate it. right now there are no mortises in the top yet, it just sits on the legs tenons - so no need for wedges to pry it apart - but It's a great method, and I may use it in the future when in need. I don't have sawhorses (well, I do - but they are plastic , and in no way can support this 400+lbs top.) but I do have some 4×4 douglas fir that I'll use as temporary legs while I take each leg for final treatments, and glueup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #82 ·
There is more than 1 way to skin a cat - not so with bowling alley floors though - finally success

Yes. Finally some light at the end of the tunnel, reverse thinking, and this project seems a bit more doable, and even not much trouble at all.

Originally I tried to get the (2.5" hardened) nails out by using a cat's paw and a hammer to pull each nail out of the 2.5 laminated hard-rock maple strips. I figured once I get all the nails out of the top strip, it'll just free it from the lamination, and be nails free… one strip at a time, until I have them all cleared out. I guess I was wrong. as you can see in this illustration - each nail is driven through 2.5 strips, and as such, it has a lot of surface contact between the nail and the wood creating the most friction and resistance this nail could have:
Rectangle Parallel Metal Shade Glass


After a full day of hard labor, aching muscles, and some major bruises on the back of my right hand from missing some hammer blows. I had nothing much to show for it, as most of the nails either got broken off, or didn't even budge to my miserable attempts.

Now that I have the base put together (dry fit) and the rough floor slab on top of it, I tried a different approach. What I did this time was pry each strip apart from the "main" slab by hammering a large all metal (body) screwdriver between the last strip and the rest of the slab to create a gap - placing a wooden wedge , and moving on - ending up separating the entire strip from the main slab just enough that I can fit the cat's paw L shape end into it, and pry it even more apart until I can slip also the nail-pulling side of the hammer in there as well, and using both tools, pry the strip completely apart from the main slab each strip still with the nails in it - but none of them broken - this results in 2 things, both positive:

1. This is a very easy method to separate the strips apart (compared to the previous attempts at least). it proved to be somewhat fast, and methodical.
2. Now that the nails are only driven through 1 laminated strip (compared to 2.5) there is much less surface contact between nail and wood, and less friction and resistance once it come to pulling the nail out. What more -the tip of the nail is now accessible, and can be hammered out whereas before I had to DIG under the head of the nail and by doing that also messed up the maple strips.
Rectangle Parallel Symmetry


Wood Rectangle Natural material Composite material Gas


So after only a couple of hours I was able to release all of the strips that will contribute to the dog hole strip and to the buffer between the dog holes and the skirt. I also started cleaning and flattening the area under the top where it'll rest on the legs (so far only did the right side):
Wood Wood stain Rectangle Hardwood Flooring


as you can see, the underside of the top is covered with tar looking layer (I guess it was used in the bowling alley to protect against moisture or leaks through the floors). I used a scraper to clean as much of it as I could before moving to the planer. as you can see, there is a price to pay as it completely marred my #5 planer - this is one of those times that I'm really glad I don't have a $300 plane… as this would really have pissed me off:
Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Font


luckily, cleaning the scraper is easy enough, and restoring the buck-bros plane would not take much time and effort. a much easier process than restoring a router bit - and the reason why I did not (yet) use my router to clean and flatten this area.

So now I have the main slab according to my plan, and the strips of maple for the dog hole strip and buffer strip - things are starting to look better and better, and this was much easier than I had experienced earlier and then I expected things to be. In fact - I'm tempted to take all the strips apart, and completely remove all nails out of the entire top - but since there really is no need for this - I'm going to hold off on this desire. I got better things to do, and really want to see this workbench finished ASAP.

Moral of this installment - to take apart a bowling alley, and remove the nail - pry the strips apart prior to taking the nail out… make a whole different experience. from "heck no way" to "gimme some more please". now I actually believe I can utilize the other 2 slabs of bowling alley I have for other projects. :eek:)

and on a side note -I just received today the hardware for the vises from Lee-Valley. always good products. always good prices, always good service:
Rectangle Font Gas Box Fashion accessory
 

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There is more than 1 way to skin a cat - not so with bowling alley floors though - finally success

Yes. Finally some light at the end of the tunnel, reverse thinking, and this project seems a bit more doable, and even not much trouble at all.

Originally I tried to get the (2.5" hardened) nails out by using a cat's paw and a hammer to pull each nail out of the 2.5 laminated hard-rock maple strips. I figured once I get all the nails out of the top strip, it'll just free it from the lamination, and be nails free… one strip at a time, until I have them all cleared out. I guess I was wrong. as you can see in this illustration - each nail is driven through 2.5 strips, and as such, it has a lot of surface contact between the nail and the wood creating the most friction and resistance this nail could have:
Rectangle Parallel Metal Shade Glass


After a full day of hard labor, aching muscles, and some major bruises on the back of my right hand from missing some hammer blows. I had nothing much to show for it, as most of the nails either got broken off, or didn't even budge to my miserable attempts.

Now that I have the base put together (dry fit) and the rough floor slab on top of it, I tried a different approach. What I did this time was pry each strip apart from the "main" slab by hammering a large all metal (body) screwdriver between the last strip and the rest of the slab to create a gap - placing a wooden wedge , and moving on - ending up separating the entire strip from the main slab just enough that I can fit the cat's paw L shape end into it, and pry it even more apart until I can slip also the nail-pulling side of the hammer in there as well, and using both tools, pry the strip completely apart from the main slab each strip still with the nails in it - but none of them broken - this results in 2 things, both positive:

1. This is a very easy method to separate the strips apart (compared to the previous attempts at least). it proved to be somewhat fast, and methodical.
2. Now that the nails are only driven through 1 laminated strip (compared to 2.5) there is much less surface contact between nail and wood, and less friction and resistance once it come to pulling the nail out. What more -the tip of the nail is now accessible, and can be hammered out whereas before I had to DIG under the head of the nail and by doing that also messed up the maple strips.
Rectangle Parallel Symmetry


Wood Rectangle Natural material Composite material Gas


So after only a couple of hours I was able to release all of the strips that will contribute to the dog hole strip and to the buffer between the dog holes and the skirt. I also started cleaning and flattening the area under the top where it'll rest on the legs (so far only did the right side):
Wood Wood stain Rectangle Hardwood Flooring


as you can see, the underside of the top is covered with tar looking layer (I guess it was used in the bowling alley to protect against moisture or leaks through the floors). I used a scraper to clean as much of it as I could before moving to the planer. as you can see, there is a price to pay as it completely marred my #5 planer - this is one of those times that I'm really glad I don't have a $300 plane… as this would really have pissed me off:
Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Font


luckily, cleaning the scraper is easy enough, and restoring the buck-bros plane would not take much time and effort. a much easier process than restoring a router bit - and the reason why I did not (yet) use my router to clean and flatten this area.

So now I have the main slab according to my plan, and the strips of maple for the dog hole strip and buffer strip - things are starting to look better and better, and this was much easier than I had experienced earlier and then I expected things to be. In fact - I'm tempted to take all the strips apart, and completely remove all nails out of the entire top - but since there really is no need for this - I'm going to hold off on this desire. I got better things to do, and really want to see this workbench finished ASAP.

Moral of this installment - to take apart a bowling alley, and remove the nail - pry the strips apart prior to taking the nail out… make a whole different experience. from "heck no way" to "gimme some more please". now I actually believe I can utilize the other 2 slabs of bowling alley I have for other projects. :eek:)

and on a side note -I just received today the hardware for the vises from Lee-Valley. always good products. always good prices, always good service:
Rectangle Font Gas Box Fashion accessory
Tough battle hope it comes together for you
 

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Discussion Starter · #84 ·
There is more than 1 way to skin a cat - not so with bowling alley floors though - finally success

Yes. Finally some light at the end of the tunnel, reverse thinking, and this project seems a bit more doable, and even not much trouble at all.

Originally I tried to get the (2.5" hardened) nails out by using a cat's paw and a hammer to pull each nail out of the 2.5 laminated hard-rock maple strips. I figured once I get all the nails out of the top strip, it'll just free it from the lamination, and be nails free… one strip at a time, until I have them all cleared out. I guess I was wrong. as you can see in this illustration - each nail is driven through 2.5 strips, and as such, it has a lot of surface contact between the nail and the wood creating the most friction and resistance this nail could have:
Rectangle Parallel Metal Shade Glass


After a full day of hard labor, aching muscles, and some major bruises on the back of my right hand from missing some hammer blows. I had nothing much to show for it, as most of the nails either got broken off, or didn't even budge to my miserable attempts.

Now that I have the base put together (dry fit) and the rough floor slab on top of it, I tried a different approach. What I did this time was pry each strip apart from the "main" slab by hammering a large all metal (body) screwdriver between the last strip and the rest of the slab to create a gap - placing a wooden wedge , and moving on - ending up separating the entire strip from the main slab just enough that I can fit the cat's paw L shape end into it, and pry it even more apart until I can slip also the nail-pulling side of the hammer in there as well, and using both tools, pry the strip completely apart from the main slab each strip still with the nails in it - but none of them broken - this results in 2 things, both positive:

1. This is a very easy method to separate the strips apart (compared to the previous attempts at least). it proved to be somewhat fast, and methodical.
2. Now that the nails are only driven through 1 laminated strip (compared to 2.5) there is much less surface contact between nail and wood, and less friction and resistance once it come to pulling the nail out. What more -the tip of the nail is now accessible, and can be hammered out whereas before I had to DIG under the head of the nail and by doing that also messed up the maple strips.
Rectangle Parallel Symmetry


Wood Rectangle Natural material Composite material Gas


So after only a couple of hours I was able to release all of the strips that will contribute to the dog hole strip and to the buffer between the dog holes and the skirt. I also started cleaning and flattening the area under the top where it'll rest on the legs (so far only did the right side):
Wood Wood stain Rectangle Hardwood Flooring


as you can see, the underside of the top is covered with tar looking layer (I guess it was used in the bowling alley to protect against moisture or leaks through the floors). I used a scraper to clean as much of it as I could before moving to the planer. as you can see, there is a price to pay as it completely marred my #5 planer - this is one of those times that I'm really glad I don't have a $300 plane… as this would really have pissed me off:
Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Font


luckily, cleaning the scraper is easy enough, and restoring the buck-bros plane would not take much time and effort. a much easier process than restoring a router bit - and the reason why I did not (yet) use my router to clean and flatten this area.

So now I have the main slab according to my plan, and the strips of maple for the dog hole strip and buffer strip - things are starting to look better and better, and this was much easier than I had experienced earlier and then I expected things to be. In fact - I'm tempted to take all the strips apart, and completely remove all nails out of the entire top - but since there really is no need for this - I'm going to hold off on this desire. I got better things to do, and really want to see this workbench finished ASAP.

Moral of this installment - to take apart a bowling alley, and remove the nail - pry the strips apart prior to taking the nail out… make a whole different experience. from "heck no way" to "gimme some more please". now I actually believe I can utilize the other 2 slabs of bowling alley I have for other projects. :eek:)

and on a side note -I just received today the hardware for the vises from Lee-Valley. always good products. always good prices, always good service:
Rectangle Font Gas Box Fashion accessory
Thanks. I actually expected this battle, and in retrospect, after my previous battle with it, this time was really easy, and in the long run will take me less time than I had dedicated for it.

Jim - it's GOING to come together, whether it likes to , or not … lol. (it's the principle now)
 

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There is more than 1 way to skin a cat - not so with bowling alley floors though - finally success

Yes. Finally some light at the end of the tunnel, reverse thinking, and this project seems a bit more doable, and even not much trouble at all.

Originally I tried to get the (2.5" hardened) nails out by using a cat's paw and a hammer to pull each nail out of the 2.5 laminated hard-rock maple strips. I figured once I get all the nails out of the top strip, it'll just free it from the lamination, and be nails free… one strip at a time, until I have them all cleared out. I guess I was wrong. as you can see in this illustration - each nail is driven through 2.5 strips, and as such, it has a lot of surface contact between the nail and the wood creating the most friction and resistance this nail could have:
Rectangle Parallel Metal Shade Glass


After a full day of hard labor, aching muscles, and some major bruises on the back of my right hand from missing some hammer blows. I had nothing much to show for it, as most of the nails either got broken off, or didn't even budge to my miserable attempts.

Now that I have the base put together (dry fit) and the rough floor slab on top of it, I tried a different approach. What I did this time was pry each strip apart from the "main" slab by hammering a large all metal (body) screwdriver between the last strip and the rest of the slab to create a gap - placing a wooden wedge , and moving on - ending up separating the entire strip from the main slab just enough that I can fit the cat's paw L shape end into it, and pry it even more apart until I can slip also the nail-pulling side of the hammer in there as well, and using both tools, pry the strip completely apart from the main slab each strip still with the nails in it - but none of them broken - this results in 2 things, both positive:

1. This is a very easy method to separate the strips apart (compared to the previous attempts at least). it proved to be somewhat fast, and methodical.
2. Now that the nails are only driven through 1 laminated strip (compared to 2.5) there is much less surface contact between nail and wood, and less friction and resistance once it come to pulling the nail out. What more -the tip of the nail is now accessible, and can be hammered out whereas before I had to DIG under the head of the nail and by doing that also messed up the maple strips.
Rectangle Parallel Symmetry


Wood Rectangle Natural material Composite material Gas


So after only a couple of hours I was able to release all of the strips that will contribute to the dog hole strip and to the buffer between the dog holes and the skirt. I also started cleaning and flattening the area under the top where it'll rest on the legs (so far only did the right side):
Wood Wood stain Rectangle Hardwood Flooring


as you can see, the underside of the top is covered with tar looking layer (I guess it was used in the bowling alley to protect against moisture or leaks through the floors). I used a scraper to clean as much of it as I could before moving to the planer. as you can see, there is a price to pay as it completely marred my #5 planer - this is one of those times that I'm really glad I don't have a $300 plane… as this would really have pissed me off:
Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Font


luckily, cleaning the scraper is easy enough, and restoring the buck-bros plane would not take much time and effort. a much easier process than restoring a router bit - and the reason why I did not (yet) use my router to clean and flatten this area.

So now I have the main slab according to my plan, and the strips of maple for the dog hole strip and buffer strip - things are starting to look better and better, and this was much easier than I had experienced earlier and then I expected things to be. In fact - I'm tempted to take all the strips apart, and completely remove all nails out of the entire top - but since there really is no need for this - I'm going to hold off on this desire. I got better things to do, and really want to see this workbench finished ASAP.

Moral of this installment - to take apart a bowling alley, and remove the nail - pry the strips apart prior to taking the nail out… make a whole different experience. from "heck no way" to "gimme some more please". now I actually believe I can utilize the other 2 slabs of bowling alley I have for other projects. :eek:)

and on a side note -I just received today the hardware for the vises from Lee-Valley. always good products. always good prices, always good service:
Rectangle Font Gas Box Fashion accessory
I've heard so many things about making anything from bowling alley materials…you're a brave man.
 

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There is more than 1 way to skin a cat - not so with bowling alley floors though - finally success

Yes. Finally some light at the end of the tunnel, reverse thinking, and this project seems a bit more doable, and even not much trouble at all.

Originally I tried to get the (2.5" hardened) nails out by using a cat's paw and a hammer to pull each nail out of the 2.5 laminated hard-rock maple strips. I figured once I get all the nails out of the top strip, it'll just free it from the lamination, and be nails free… one strip at a time, until I have them all cleared out. I guess I was wrong. as you can see in this illustration - each nail is driven through 2.5 strips, and as such, it has a lot of surface contact between the nail and the wood creating the most friction and resistance this nail could have:
Rectangle Parallel Metal Shade Glass


After a full day of hard labor, aching muscles, and some major bruises on the back of my right hand from missing some hammer blows. I had nothing much to show for it, as most of the nails either got broken off, or didn't even budge to my miserable attempts.

Now that I have the base put together (dry fit) and the rough floor slab on top of it, I tried a different approach. What I did this time was pry each strip apart from the "main" slab by hammering a large all metal (body) screwdriver between the last strip and the rest of the slab to create a gap - placing a wooden wedge , and moving on - ending up separating the entire strip from the main slab just enough that I can fit the cat's paw L shape end into it, and pry it even more apart until I can slip also the nail-pulling side of the hammer in there as well, and using both tools, pry the strip completely apart from the main slab each strip still with the nails in it - but none of them broken - this results in 2 things, both positive:

1. This is a very easy method to separate the strips apart (compared to the previous attempts at least). it proved to be somewhat fast, and methodical.
2. Now that the nails are only driven through 1 laminated strip (compared to 2.5) there is much less surface contact between nail and wood, and less friction and resistance once it come to pulling the nail out. What more -the tip of the nail is now accessible, and can be hammered out whereas before I had to DIG under the head of the nail and by doing that also messed up the maple strips.
Rectangle Parallel Symmetry


Wood Rectangle Natural material Composite material Gas


So after only a couple of hours I was able to release all of the strips that will contribute to the dog hole strip and to the buffer between the dog holes and the skirt. I also started cleaning and flattening the area under the top where it'll rest on the legs (so far only did the right side):
Wood Wood stain Rectangle Hardwood Flooring


as you can see, the underside of the top is covered with tar looking layer (I guess it was used in the bowling alley to protect against moisture or leaks through the floors). I used a scraper to clean as much of it as I could before moving to the planer. as you can see, there is a price to pay as it completely marred my #5 planer - this is one of those times that I'm really glad I don't have a $300 plane… as this would really have pissed me off:
Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Font


luckily, cleaning the scraper is easy enough, and restoring the buck-bros plane would not take much time and effort. a much easier process than restoring a router bit - and the reason why I did not (yet) use my router to clean and flatten this area.

So now I have the main slab according to my plan, and the strips of maple for the dog hole strip and buffer strip - things are starting to look better and better, and this was much easier than I had experienced earlier and then I expected things to be. In fact - I'm tempted to take all the strips apart, and completely remove all nails out of the entire top - but since there really is no need for this - I'm going to hold off on this desire. I got better things to do, and really want to see this workbench finished ASAP.

Moral of this installment - to take apart a bowling alley, and remove the nail - pry the strips apart prior to taking the nail out… make a whole different experience. from "heck no way" to "gimme some more please". now I actually believe I can utilize the other 2 slabs of bowling alley I have for other projects. :eek:)

and on a side note -I just received today the hardware for the vises from Lee-Valley. always good products. always good prices, always good service:
Rectangle Font Gas Box Fashion accessory
I'm tired just reading about this process!
Ellen
 

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Discussion Starter · #87 ·
There is more than 1 way to skin a cat - not so with bowling alley floors though - finally success

Yes. Finally some light at the end of the tunnel, reverse thinking, and this project seems a bit more doable, and even not much trouble at all.

Originally I tried to get the (2.5" hardened) nails out by using a cat's paw and a hammer to pull each nail out of the 2.5 laminated hard-rock maple strips. I figured once I get all the nails out of the top strip, it'll just free it from the lamination, and be nails free… one strip at a time, until I have them all cleared out. I guess I was wrong. as you can see in this illustration - each nail is driven through 2.5 strips, and as such, it has a lot of surface contact between the nail and the wood creating the most friction and resistance this nail could have:
Rectangle Parallel Metal Shade Glass


After a full day of hard labor, aching muscles, and some major bruises on the back of my right hand from missing some hammer blows. I had nothing much to show for it, as most of the nails either got broken off, or didn't even budge to my miserable attempts.

Now that I have the base put together (dry fit) and the rough floor slab on top of it, I tried a different approach. What I did this time was pry each strip apart from the "main" slab by hammering a large all metal (body) screwdriver between the last strip and the rest of the slab to create a gap - placing a wooden wedge , and moving on - ending up separating the entire strip from the main slab just enough that I can fit the cat's paw L shape end into it, and pry it even more apart until I can slip also the nail-pulling side of the hammer in there as well, and using both tools, pry the strip completely apart from the main slab each strip still with the nails in it - but none of them broken - this results in 2 things, both positive:

1. This is a very easy method to separate the strips apart (compared to the previous attempts at least). it proved to be somewhat fast, and methodical.
2. Now that the nails are only driven through 1 laminated strip (compared to 2.5) there is much less surface contact between nail and wood, and less friction and resistance once it come to pulling the nail out. What more -the tip of the nail is now accessible, and can be hammered out whereas before I had to DIG under the head of the nail and by doing that also messed up the maple strips.
Rectangle Parallel Symmetry


Wood Rectangle Natural material Composite material Gas


So after only a couple of hours I was able to release all of the strips that will contribute to the dog hole strip and to the buffer between the dog holes and the skirt. I also started cleaning and flattening the area under the top where it'll rest on the legs (so far only did the right side):
Wood Wood stain Rectangle Hardwood Flooring


as you can see, the underside of the top is covered with tar looking layer (I guess it was used in the bowling alley to protect against moisture or leaks through the floors). I used a scraper to clean as much of it as I could before moving to the planer. as you can see, there is a price to pay as it completely marred my #5 planer - this is one of those times that I'm really glad I don't have a $300 plane… as this would really have pissed me off:
Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Font


luckily, cleaning the scraper is easy enough, and restoring the buck-bros plane would not take much time and effort. a much easier process than restoring a router bit - and the reason why I did not (yet) use my router to clean and flatten this area.

So now I have the main slab according to my plan, and the strips of maple for the dog hole strip and buffer strip - things are starting to look better and better, and this was much easier than I had experienced earlier and then I expected things to be. In fact - I'm tempted to take all the strips apart, and completely remove all nails out of the entire top - but since there really is no need for this - I'm going to hold off on this desire. I got better things to do, and really want to see this workbench finished ASAP.

Moral of this installment - to take apart a bowling alley, and remove the nail - pry the strips apart prior to taking the nail out… make a whole different experience. from "heck no way" to "gimme some more please". now I actually believe I can utilize the other 2 slabs of bowling alley I have for other projects. :eek:)

and on a side note -I just received today the hardware for the vises from Lee-Valley. always good products. always good prices, always good service:
Rectangle Font Gas Box Fashion accessory
Ellen, I know what you mean - after my last experience, I was tired and very unmotivated before I started working on it this time, but after the huge difference in reduced labor, time, and psych I'm actually very energized now, and am ready to take it all up… much more than I was before working on this part.
 

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There is more than 1 way to skin a cat - not so with bowling alley floors though - finally success

Yes. Finally some light at the end of the tunnel, reverse thinking, and this project seems a bit more doable, and even not much trouble at all.

Originally I tried to get the (2.5" hardened) nails out by using a cat's paw and a hammer to pull each nail out of the 2.5 laminated hard-rock maple strips. I figured once I get all the nails out of the top strip, it'll just free it from the lamination, and be nails free… one strip at a time, until I have them all cleared out. I guess I was wrong. as you can see in this illustration - each nail is driven through 2.5 strips, and as such, it has a lot of surface contact between the nail and the wood creating the most friction and resistance this nail could have:
Rectangle Parallel Metal Shade Glass


After a full day of hard labor, aching muscles, and some major bruises on the back of my right hand from missing some hammer blows. I had nothing much to show for it, as most of the nails either got broken off, or didn't even budge to my miserable attempts.

Now that I have the base put together (dry fit) and the rough floor slab on top of it, I tried a different approach. What I did this time was pry each strip apart from the "main" slab by hammering a large all metal (body) screwdriver between the last strip and the rest of the slab to create a gap - placing a wooden wedge , and moving on - ending up separating the entire strip from the main slab just enough that I can fit the cat's paw L shape end into it, and pry it even more apart until I can slip also the nail-pulling side of the hammer in there as well, and using both tools, pry the strip completely apart from the main slab each strip still with the nails in it - but none of them broken - this results in 2 things, both positive:

1. This is a very easy method to separate the strips apart (compared to the previous attempts at least). it proved to be somewhat fast, and methodical.
2. Now that the nails are only driven through 1 laminated strip (compared to 2.5) there is much less surface contact between nail and wood, and less friction and resistance once it come to pulling the nail out. What more -the tip of the nail is now accessible, and can be hammered out whereas before I had to DIG under the head of the nail and by doing that also messed up the maple strips.
Rectangle Parallel Symmetry


Wood Rectangle Natural material Composite material Gas


So after only a couple of hours I was able to release all of the strips that will contribute to the dog hole strip and to the buffer between the dog holes and the skirt. I also started cleaning and flattening the area under the top where it'll rest on the legs (so far only did the right side):
Wood Wood stain Rectangle Hardwood Flooring


as you can see, the underside of the top is covered with tar looking layer (I guess it was used in the bowling alley to protect against moisture or leaks through the floors). I used a scraper to clean as much of it as I could before moving to the planer. as you can see, there is a price to pay as it completely marred my #5 planer - this is one of those times that I'm really glad I don't have a $300 plane… as this would really have pissed me off:
Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Font


luckily, cleaning the scraper is easy enough, and restoring the buck-bros plane would not take much time and effort. a much easier process than restoring a router bit - and the reason why I did not (yet) use my router to clean and flatten this area.

So now I have the main slab according to my plan, and the strips of maple for the dog hole strip and buffer strip - things are starting to look better and better, and this was much easier than I had experienced earlier and then I expected things to be. In fact - I'm tempted to take all the strips apart, and completely remove all nails out of the entire top - but since there really is no need for this - I'm going to hold off on this desire. I got better things to do, and really want to see this workbench finished ASAP.

Moral of this installment - to take apart a bowling alley, and remove the nail - pry the strips apart prior to taking the nail out… make a whole different experience. from "heck no way" to "gimme some more please". now I actually believe I can utilize the other 2 slabs of bowling alley I have for other projects. :eek:)

and on a side note -I just received today the hardware for the vises from Lee-Valley. always good products. always good prices, always good service:
Rectangle Font Gas Box Fashion accessory
Sweet! I am very glad you didn't have to kill yourself getting these nails out. Went from an oh my ** all weekend to an evening or two kinda work. As always looking forward to the next installment!
 

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There is more than 1 way to skin a cat - not so with bowling alley floors though - finally success

Yes. Finally some light at the end of the tunnel, reverse thinking, and this project seems a bit more doable, and even not much trouble at all.

Originally I tried to get the (2.5" hardened) nails out by using a cat's paw and a hammer to pull each nail out of the 2.5 laminated hard-rock maple strips. I figured once I get all the nails out of the top strip, it'll just free it from the lamination, and be nails free… one strip at a time, until I have them all cleared out. I guess I was wrong. as you can see in this illustration - each nail is driven through 2.5 strips, and as such, it has a lot of surface contact between the nail and the wood creating the most friction and resistance this nail could have:
Rectangle Parallel Metal Shade Glass


After a full day of hard labor, aching muscles, and some major bruises on the back of my right hand from missing some hammer blows. I had nothing much to show for it, as most of the nails either got broken off, or didn't even budge to my miserable attempts.

Now that I have the base put together (dry fit) and the rough floor slab on top of it, I tried a different approach. What I did this time was pry each strip apart from the "main" slab by hammering a large all metal (body) screwdriver between the last strip and the rest of the slab to create a gap - placing a wooden wedge , and moving on - ending up separating the entire strip from the main slab just enough that I can fit the cat's paw L shape end into it, and pry it even more apart until I can slip also the nail-pulling side of the hammer in there as well, and using both tools, pry the strip completely apart from the main slab each strip still with the nails in it - but none of them broken - this results in 2 things, both positive:

1. This is a very easy method to separate the strips apart (compared to the previous attempts at least). it proved to be somewhat fast, and methodical.
2. Now that the nails are only driven through 1 laminated strip (compared to 2.5) there is much less surface contact between nail and wood, and less friction and resistance once it come to pulling the nail out. What more -the tip of the nail is now accessible, and can be hammered out whereas before I had to DIG under the head of the nail and by doing that also messed up the maple strips.
Rectangle Parallel Symmetry


Wood Rectangle Natural material Composite material Gas


So after only a couple of hours I was able to release all of the strips that will contribute to the dog hole strip and to the buffer between the dog holes and the skirt. I also started cleaning and flattening the area under the top where it'll rest on the legs (so far only did the right side):
Wood Wood stain Rectangle Hardwood Flooring


as you can see, the underside of the top is covered with tar looking layer (I guess it was used in the bowling alley to protect against moisture or leaks through the floors). I used a scraper to clean as much of it as I could before moving to the planer. as you can see, there is a price to pay as it completely marred my #5 planer - this is one of those times that I'm really glad I don't have a $300 plane… as this would really have pissed me off:
Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Font


luckily, cleaning the scraper is easy enough, and restoring the buck-bros plane would not take much time and effort. a much easier process than restoring a router bit - and the reason why I did not (yet) use my router to clean and flatten this area.

So now I have the main slab according to my plan, and the strips of maple for the dog hole strip and buffer strip - things are starting to look better and better, and this was much easier than I had experienced earlier and then I expected things to be. In fact - I'm tempted to take all the strips apart, and completely remove all nails out of the entire top - but since there really is no need for this - I'm going to hold off on this desire. I got better things to do, and really want to see this workbench finished ASAP.

Moral of this installment - to take apart a bowling alley, and remove the nail - pry the strips apart prior to taking the nail out… make a whole different experience. from "heck no way" to "gimme some more please". now I actually believe I can utilize the other 2 slabs of bowling alley I have for other projects. :eek:)

and on a side note -I just received today the hardware for the vises from Lee-Valley. always good products. always good prices, always good service:
Rectangle Font Gas Box Fashion accessory
Nice!

Keep it up… you're inspiring me to get working on my bench. Unfortunately, life seems to keep getting in the way of shop time. Strange how that happens…
 

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There is more than 1 way to skin a cat - not so with bowling alley floors though - finally success

Yes. Finally some light at the end of the tunnel, reverse thinking, and this project seems a bit more doable, and even not much trouble at all.

Originally I tried to get the (2.5" hardened) nails out by using a cat's paw and a hammer to pull each nail out of the 2.5 laminated hard-rock maple strips. I figured once I get all the nails out of the top strip, it'll just free it from the lamination, and be nails free… one strip at a time, until I have them all cleared out. I guess I was wrong. as you can see in this illustration - each nail is driven through 2.5 strips, and as such, it has a lot of surface contact between the nail and the wood creating the most friction and resistance this nail could have:
Rectangle Parallel Metal Shade Glass


After a full day of hard labor, aching muscles, and some major bruises on the back of my right hand from missing some hammer blows. I had nothing much to show for it, as most of the nails either got broken off, or didn't even budge to my miserable attempts.

Now that I have the base put together (dry fit) and the rough floor slab on top of it, I tried a different approach. What I did this time was pry each strip apart from the "main" slab by hammering a large all metal (body) screwdriver between the last strip and the rest of the slab to create a gap - placing a wooden wedge , and moving on - ending up separating the entire strip from the main slab just enough that I can fit the cat's paw L shape end into it, and pry it even more apart until I can slip also the nail-pulling side of the hammer in there as well, and using both tools, pry the strip completely apart from the main slab each strip still with the nails in it - but none of them broken - this results in 2 things, both positive:

1. This is a very easy method to separate the strips apart (compared to the previous attempts at least). it proved to be somewhat fast, and methodical.
2. Now that the nails are only driven through 1 laminated strip (compared to 2.5) there is much less surface contact between nail and wood, and less friction and resistance once it come to pulling the nail out. What more -the tip of the nail is now accessible, and can be hammered out whereas before I had to DIG under the head of the nail and by doing that also messed up the maple strips.
Rectangle Parallel Symmetry


Wood Rectangle Natural material Composite material Gas


So after only a couple of hours I was able to release all of the strips that will contribute to the dog hole strip and to the buffer between the dog holes and the skirt. I also started cleaning and flattening the area under the top where it'll rest on the legs (so far only did the right side):
Wood Wood stain Rectangle Hardwood Flooring


as you can see, the underside of the top is covered with tar looking layer (I guess it was used in the bowling alley to protect against moisture or leaks through the floors). I used a scraper to clean as much of it as I could before moving to the planer. as you can see, there is a price to pay as it completely marred my #5 planer - this is one of those times that I'm really glad I don't have a $300 plane… as this would really have pissed me off:
Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Font


luckily, cleaning the scraper is easy enough, and restoring the buck-bros plane would not take much time and effort. a much easier process than restoring a router bit - and the reason why I did not (yet) use my router to clean and flatten this area.

So now I have the main slab according to my plan, and the strips of maple for the dog hole strip and buffer strip - things are starting to look better and better, and this was much easier than I had experienced earlier and then I expected things to be. In fact - I'm tempted to take all the strips apart, and completely remove all nails out of the entire top - but since there really is no need for this - I'm going to hold off on this desire. I got better things to do, and really want to see this workbench finished ASAP.

Moral of this installment - to take apart a bowling alley, and remove the nail - pry the strips apart prior to taking the nail out… make a whole different experience. from "heck no way" to "gimme some more please". now I actually believe I can utilize the other 2 slabs of bowling alley I have for other projects. :eek:)

and on a side note -I just received today the hardware for the vises from Lee-Valley. always good products. always good prices, always good service:
Rectangle Font Gas Box Fashion accessory
Is there a way to sort veneer cut the bottom off?
 

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There is more than 1 way to skin a cat - not so with bowling alley floors though - finally success

Yes. Finally some light at the end of the tunnel, reverse thinking, and this project seems a bit more doable, and even not much trouble at all.

Originally I tried to get the (2.5" hardened) nails out by using a cat's paw and a hammer to pull each nail out of the 2.5 laminated hard-rock maple strips. I figured once I get all the nails out of the top strip, it'll just free it from the lamination, and be nails free… one strip at a time, until I have them all cleared out. I guess I was wrong. as you can see in this illustration - each nail is driven through 2.5 strips, and as such, it has a lot of surface contact between the nail and the wood creating the most friction and resistance this nail could have:
Rectangle Parallel Metal Shade Glass


After a full day of hard labor, aching muscles, and some major bruises on the back of my right hand from missing some hammer blows. I had nothing much to show for it, as most of the nails either got broken off, or didn't even budge to my miserable attempts.

Now that I have the base put together (dry fit) and the rough floor slab on top of it, I tried a different approach. What I did this time was pry each strip apart from the "main" slab by hammering a large all metal (body) screwdriver between the last strip and the rest of the slab to create a gap - placing a wooden wedge , and moving on - ending up separating the entire strip from the main slab just enough that I can fit the cat's paw L shape end into it, and pry it even more apart until I can slip also the nail-pulling side of the hammer in there as well, and using both tools, pry the strip completely apart from the main slab each strip still with the nails in it - but none of them broken - this results in 2 things, both positive:

1. This is a very easy method to separate the strips apart (compared to the previous attempts at least). it proved to be somewhat fast, and methodical.
2. Now that the nails are only driven through 1 laminated strip (compared to 2.5) there is much less surface contact between nail and wood, and less friction and resistance once it come to pulling the nail out. What more -the tip of the nail is now accessible, and can be hammered out whereas before I had to DIG under the head of the nail and by doing that also messed up the maple strips.
Rectangle Parallel Symmetry


Wood Rectangle Natural material Composite material Gas


So after only a couple of hours I was able to release all of the strips that will contribute to the dog hole strip and to the buffer between the dog holes and the skirt. I also started cleaning and flattening the area under the top where it'll rest on the legs (so far only did the right side):
Wood Wood stain Rectangle Hardwood Flooring


as you can see, the underside of the top is covered with tar looking layer (I guess it was used in the bowling alley to protect against moisture or leaks through the floors). I used a scraper to clean as much of it as I could before moving to the planer. as you can see, there is a price to pay as it completely marred my #5 planer - this is one of those times that I'm really glad I don't have a $300 plane… as this would really have pissed me off:
Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Font


luckily, cleaning the scraper is easy enough, and restoring the buck-bros plane would not take much time and effort. a much easier process than restoring a router bit - and the reason why I did not (yet) use my router to clean and flatten this area.

So now I have the main slab according to my plan, and the strips of maple for the dog hole strip and buffer strip - things are starting to look better and better, and this was much easier than I had experienced earlier and then I expected things to be. In fact - I'm tempted to take all the strips apart, and completely remove all nails out of the entire top - but since there really is no need for this - I'm going to hold off on this desire. I got better things to do, and really want to see this workbench finished ASAP.

Moral of this installment - to take apart a bowling alley, and remove the nail - pry the strips apart prior to taking the nail out… make a whole different experience. from "heck no way" to "gimme some more please". now I actually believe I can utilize the other 2 slabs of bowling alley I have for other projects. :eek:)

and on a side note -I just received today the hardware for the vises from Lee-Valley. always good products. always good prices, always good service:
Rectangle Font Gas Box Fashion accessory
Why didn't you try to use a solvent to take the tar off first? That would take most of it off so you wouldn't have to ruin perfectly good tools…
 

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There is more than 1 way to skin a cat - not so with bowling alley floors though - finally success

Yes. Finally some light at the end of the tunnel, reverse thinking, and this project seems a bit more doable, and even not much trouble at all.

Originally I tried to get the (2.5" hardened) nails out by using a cat's paw and a hammer to pull each nail out of the 2.5 laminated hard-rock maple strips. I figured once I get all the nails out of the top strip, it'll just free it from the lamination, and be nails free… one strip at a time, until I have them all cleared out. I guess I was wrong. as you can see in this illustration - each nail is driven through 2.5 strips, and as such, it has a lot of surface contact between the nail and the wood creating the most friction and resistance this nail could have:
Rectangle Parallel Metal Shade Glass


After a full day of hard labor, aching muscles, and some major bruises on the back of my right hand from missing some hammer blows. I had nothing much to show for it, as most of the nails either got broken off, or didn't even budge to my miserable attempts.

Now that I have the base put together (dry fit) and the rough floor slab on top of it, I tried a different approach. What I did this time was pry each strip apart from the "main" slab by hammering a large all metal (body) screwdriver between the last strip and the rest of the slab to create a gap - placing a wooden wedge , and moving on - ending up separating the entire strip from the main slab just enough that I can fit the cat's paw L shape end into it, and pry it even more apart until I can slip also the nail-pulling side of the hammer in there as well, and using both tools, pry the strip completely apart from the main slab each strip still with the nails in it - but none of them broken - this results in 2 things, both positive:

1. This is a very easy method to separate the strips apart (compared to the previous attempts at least). it proved to be somewhat fast, and methodical.
2. Now that the nails are only driven through 1 laminated strip (compared to 2.5) there is much less surface contact between nail and wood, and less friction and resistance once it come to pulling the nail out. What more -the tip of the nail is now accessible, and can be hammered out whereas before I had to DIG under the head of the nail and by doing that also messed up the maple strips.
Rectangle Parallel Symmetry


Wood Rectangle Natural material Composite material Gas


So after only a couple of hours I was able to release all of the strips that will contribute to the dog hole strip and to the buffer between the dog holes and the skirt. I also started cleaning and flattening the area under the top where it'll rest on the legs (so far only did the right side):
Wood Wood stain Rectangle Hardwood Flooring


as you can see, the underside of the top is covered with tar looking layer (I guess it was used in the bowling alley to protect against moisture or leaks through the floors). I used a scraper to clean as much of it as I could before moving to the planer. as you can see, there is a price to pay as it completely marred my #5 planer - this is one of those times that I'm really glad I don't have a $300 plane… as this would really have pissed me off:
Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Font


luckily, cleaning the scraper is easy enough, and restoring the buck-bros plane would not take much time and effort. a much easier process than restoring a router bit - and the reason why I did not (yet) use my router to clean and flatten this area.

So now I have the main slab according to my plan, and the strips of maple for the dog hole strip and buffer strip - things are starting to look better and better, and this was much easier than I had experienced earlier and then I expected things to be. In fact - I'm tempted to take all the strips apart, and completely remove all nails out of the entire top - but since there really is no need for this - I'm going to hold off on this desire. I got better things to do, and really want to see this workbench finished ASAP.

Moral of this installment - to take apart a bowling alley, and remove the nail - pry the strips apart prior to taking the nail out… make a whole different experience. from "heck no way" to "gimme some more please". now I actually believe I can utilize the other 2 slabs of bowling alley I have for other projects. :eek:)

and on a side note -I just received today the hardware for the vises from Lee-Valley. always good products. always good prices, always good service:
Rectangle Font Gas Box Fashion accessory
I think for the tarred bottom I would have gotten something like a car-polisher and chucked a wire bristle brush in it. That would shred up the tar and ball it all up, also packing it with dust shaved from the wood beneath. I did similar (with a drill and small wire bristle bit) to clean up a lot of the wax I spilled into my rough concrete floor. It sanded some of the concrete off and balled it up with the wax to create little hard balls I could vacuum right up.Then you could hit it with the plane if it needed it.
 

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There is more than 1 way to skin a cat - not so with bowling alley floors though - finally success

Yes. Finally some light at the end of the tunnel, reverse thinking, and this project seems a bit more doable, and even not much trouble at all.

Originally I tried to get the (2.5" hardened) nails out by using a cat's paw and a hammer to pull each nail out of the 2.5 laminated hard-rock maple strips. I figured once I get all the nails out of the top strip, it'll just free it from the lamination, and be nails free… one strip at a time, until I have them all cleared out. I guess I was wrong. as you can see in this illustration - each nail is driven through 2.5 strips, and as such, it has a lot of surface contact between the nail and the wood creating the most friction and resistance this nail could have:
Rectangle Parallel Metal Shade Glass


After a full day of hard labor, aching muscles, and some major bruises on the back of my right hand from missing some hammer blows. I had nothing much to show for it, as most of the nails either got broken off, or didn't even budge to my miserable attempts.

Now that I have the base put together (dry fit) and the rough floor slab on top of it, I tried a different approach. What I did this time was pry each strip apart from the "main" slab by hammering a large all metal (body) screwdriver between the last strip and the rest of the slab to create a gap - placing a wooden wedge , and moving on - ending up separating the entire strip from the main slab just enough that I can fit the cat's paw L shape end into it, and pry it even more apart until I can slip also the nail-pulling side of the hammer in there as well, and using both tools, pry the strip completely apart from the main slab each strip still with the nails in it - but none of them broken - this results in 2 things, both positive:

1. This is a very easy method to separate the strips apart (compared to the previous attempts at least). it proved to be somewhat fast, and methodical.
2. Now that the nails are only driven through 1 laminated strip (compared to 2.5) there is much less surface contact between nail and wood, and less friction and resistance once it come to pulling the nail out. What more -the tip of the nail is now accessible, and can be hammered out whereas before I had to DIG under the head of the nail and by doing that also messed up the maple strips.
Rectangle Parallel Symmetry


Wood Rectangle Natural material Composite material Gas


So after only a couple of hours I was able to release all of the strips that will contribute to the dog hole strip and to the buffer between the dog holes and the skirt. I also started cleaning and flattening the area under the top where it'll rest on the legs (so far only did the right side):
Wood Wood stain Rectangle Hardwood Flooring


as you can see, the underside of the top is covered with tar looking layer (I guess it was used in the bowling alley to protect against moisture or leaks through the floors). I used a scraper to clean as much of it as I could before moving to the planer. as you can see, there is a price to pay as it completely marred my #5 planer - this is one of those times that I'm really glad I don't have a $300 plane… as this would really have pissed me off:
Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Font


luckily, cleaning the scraper is easy enough, and restoring the buck-bros plane would not take much time and effort. a much easier process than restoring a router bit - and the reason why I did not (yet) use my router to clean and flatten this area.

So now I have the main slab according to my plan, and the strips of maple for the dog hole strip and buffer strip - things are starting to look better and better, and this was much easier than I had experienced earlier and then I expected things to be. In fact - I'm tempted to take all the strips apart, and completely remove all nails out of the entire top - but since there really is no need for this - I'm going to hold off on this desire. I got better things to do, and really want to see this workbench finished ASAP.

Moral of this installment - to take apart a bowling alley, and remove the nail - pry the strips apart prior to taking the nail out… make a whole different experience. from "heck no way" to "gimme some more please". now I actually believe I can utilize the other 2 slabs of bowling alley I have for other projects. :eek:)

and on a side note -I just received today the hardware for the vises from Lee-Valley. always good products. always good prices, always good service:
Rectangle Font Gas Box Fashion accessory
Ryan - consider this blog for you, as you'll be able to just follow the good stuff and avoid the [email protected]…lol

Julian and Gary - um….. yeah… now why didn't I think of that?!? I'm going to take your advice and try to clean the tar with a wire brush, and solvent… whichever one will work better and faster. definitely one of those "DOPE" moments here… lol THANKS!!
 

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There is more than 1 way to skin a cat - not so with bowling alley floors though - finally success

Yes. Finally some light at the end of the tunnel, reverse thinking, and this project seems a bit more doable, and even not much trouble at all.

Originally I tried to get the (2.5" hardened) nails out by using a cat's paw and a hammer to pull each nail out of the 2.5 laminated hard-rock maple strips. I figured once I get all the nails out of the top strip, it'll just free it from the lamination, and be nails free… one strip at a time, until I have them all cleared out. I guess I was wrong. as you can see in this illustration - each nail is driven through 2.5 strips, and as such, it has a lot of surface contact between the nail and the wood creating the most friction and resistance this nail could have:
Rectangle Parallel Metal Shade Glass


After a full day of hard labor, aching muscles, and some major bruises on the back of my right hand from missing some hammer blows. I had nothing much to show for it, as most of the nails either got broken off, or didn't even budge to my miserable attempts.

Now that I have the base put together (dry fit) and the rough floor slab on top of it, I tried a different approach. What I did this time was pry each strip apart from the "main" slab by hammering a large all metal (body) screwdriver between the last strip and the rest of the slab to create a gap - placing a wooden wedge , and moving on - ending up separating the entire strip from the main slab just enough that I can fit the cat's paw L shape end into it, and pry it even more apart until I can slip also the nail-pulling side of the hammer in there as well, and using both tools, pry the strip completely apart from the main slab each strip still with the nails in it - but none of them broken - this results in 2 things, both positive:

1. This is a very easy method to separate the strips apart (compared to the previous attempts at least). it proved to be somewhat fast, and methodical.
2. Now that the nails are only driven through 1 laminated strip (compared to 2.5) there is much less surface contact between nail and wood, and less friction and resistance once it come to pulling the nail out. What more -the tip of the nail is now accessible, and can be hammered out whereas before I had to DIG under the head of the nail and by doing that also messed up the maple strips.
Rectangle Parallel Symmetry


Wood Rectangle Natural material Composite material Gas


So after only a couple of hours I was able to release all of the strips that will contribute to the dog hole strip and to the buffer between the dog holes and the skirt. I also started cleaning and flattening the area under the top where it'll rest on the legs (so far only did the right side):
Wood Wood stain Rectangle Hardwood Flooring


as you can see, the underside of the top is covered with tar looking layer (I guess it was used in the bowling alley to protect against moisture or leaks through the floors). I used a scraper to clean as much of it as I could before moving to the planer. as you can see, there is a price to pay as it completely marred my #5 planer - this is one of those times that I'm really glad I don't have a $300 plane… as this would really have pissed me off:
Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Font


luckily, cleaning the scraper is easy enough, and restoring the buck-bros plane would not take much time and effort. a much easier process than restoring a router bit - and the reason why I did not (yet) use my router to clean and flatten this area.

So now I have the main slab according to my plan, and the strips of maple for the dog hole strip and buffer strip - things are starting to look better and better, and this was much easier than I had experienced earlier and then I expected things to be. In fact - I'm tempted to take all the strips apart, and completely remove all nails out of the entire top - but since there really is no need for this - I'm going to hold off on this desire. I got better things to do, and really want to see this workbench finished ASAP.

Moral of this installment - to take apart a bowling alley, and remove the nail - pry the strips apart prior to taking the nail out… make a whole different experience. from "heck no way" to "gimme some more please". now I actually believe I can utilize the other 2 slabs of bowling alley I have for other projects. :eek:)

and on a side note -I just received today the hardware for the vises from Lee-Valley. always good products. always good prices, always good service:
Rectangle Font Gas Box Fashion accessory
Haha, it's not a dope moment. It's planelust. I'm seeing it more and more, and carefully guarding against it in my own life. When you love your planes, you see the world as planeable surfaces!
 

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Discussion Starter · #95 ·
There is more than 1 way to skin a cat - not so with bowling alley floors though - finally success

Yes. Finally some light at the end of the tunnel, reverse thinking, and this project seems a bit more doable, and even not much trouble at all.

Originally I tried to get the (2.5" hardened) nails out by using a cat's paw and a hammer to pull each nail out of the 2.5 laminated hard-rock maple strips. I figured once I get all the nails out of the top strip, it'll just free it from the lamination, and be nails free… one strip at a time, until I have them all cleared out. I guess I was wrong. as you can see in this illustration - each nail is driven through 2.5 strips, and as such, it has a lot of surface contact between the nail and the wood creating the most friction and resistance this nail could have:
Rectangle Parallel Metal Shade Glass


After a full day of hard labor, aching muscles, and some major bruises on the back of my right hand from missing some hammer blows. I had nothing much to show for it, as most of the nails either got broken off, or didn't even budge to my miserable attempts.

Now that I have the base put together (dry fit) and the rough floor slab on top of it, I tried a different approach. What I did this time was pry each strip apart from the "main" slab by hammering a large all metal (body) screwdriver between the last strip and the rest of the slab to create a gap - placing a wooden wedge , and moving on - ending up separating the entire strip from the main slab just enough that I can fit the cat's paw L shape end into it, and pry it even more apart until I can slip also the nail-pulling side of the hammer in there as well, and using both tools, pry the strip completely apart from the main slab each strip still with the nails in it - but none of them broken - this results in 2 things, both positive:

1. This is a very easy method to separate the strips apart (compared to the previous attempts at least). it proved to be somewhat fast, and methodical.
2. Now that the nails are only driven through 1 laminated strip (compared to 2.5) there is much less surface contact between nail and wood, and less friction and resistance once it come to pulling the nail out. What more -the tip of the nail is now accessible, and can be hammered out whereas before I had to DIG under the head of the nail and by doing that also messed up the maple strips.
Rectangle Parallel Symmetry


Wood Rectangle Natural material Composite material Gas


So after only a couple of hours I was able to release all of the strips that will contribute to the dog hole strip and to the buffer between the dog holes and the skirt. I also started cleaning and flattening the area under the top where it'll rest on the legs (so far only did the right side):
Wood Wood stain Rectangle Hardwood Flooring


as you can see, the underside of the top is covered with tar looking layer (I guess it was used in the bowling alley to protect against moisture or leaks through the floors). I used a scraper to clean as much of it as I could before moving to the planer. as you can see, there is a price to pay as it completely marred my #5 planer - this is one of those times that I'm really glad I don't have a $300 plane… as this would really have pissed me off:
Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Font


luckily, cleaning the scraper is easy enough, and restoring the buck-bros plane would not take much time and effort. a much easier process than restoring a router bit - and the reason why I did not (yet) use my router to clean and flatten this area.

So now I have the main slab according to my plan, and the strips of maple for the dog hole strip and buffer strip - things are starting to look better and better, and this was much easier than I had experienced earlier and then I expected things to be. In fact - I'm tempted to take all the strips apart, and completely remove all nails out of the entire top - but since there really is no need for this - I'm going to hold off on this desire. I got better things to do, and really want to see this workbench finished ASAP.

Moral of this installment - to take apart a bowling alley, and remove the nail - pry the strips apart prior to taking the nail out… make a whole different experience. from "heck no way" to "gimme some more please". now I actually believe I can utilize the other 2 slabs of bowling alley I have for other projects. :eek:)

and on a side note -I just received today the hardware for the vises from Lee-Valley. always good products. always good prices, always good service:
Rectangle Font Gas Box Fashion accessory
Amen to that!

but at the same time - you don't really wanna gum up your precious planes that you invested time and elbow grease tuning up…

gonna stop at sears on my way home and pick up a 5/8" thread wire brush for my angle grinder… and go for a spin (pun intended) on this… thanks again. then maybe some solvent for some final cleanup.
 

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There is more than 1 way to skin a cat - not so with bowling alley floors though - finally success

Yes. Finally some light at the end of the tunnel, reverse thinking, and this project seems a bit more doable, and even not much trouble at all.

Originally I tried to get the (2.5" hardened) nails out by using a cat's paw and a hammer to pull each nail out of the 2.5 laminated hard-rock maple strips. I figured once I get all the nails out of the top strip, it'll just free it from the lamination, and be nails free… one strip at a time, until I have them all cleared out. I guess I was wrong. as you can see in this illustration - each nail is driven through 2.5 strips, and as such, it has a lot of surface contact between the nail and the wood creating the most friction and resistance this nail could have:
Rectangle Parallel Metal Shade Glass


After a full day of hard labor, aching muscles, and some major bruises on the back of my right hand from missing some hammer blows. I had nothing much to show for it, as most of the nails either got broken off, or didn't even budge to my miserable attempts.

Now that I have the base put together (dry fit) and the rough floor slab on top of it, I tried a different approach. What I did this time was pry each strip apart from the "main" slab by hammering a large all metal (body) screwdriver between the last strip and the rest of the slab to create a gap - placing a wooden wedge , and moving on - ending up separating the entire strip from the main slab just enough that I can fit the cat's paw L shape end into it, and pry it even more apart until I can slip also the nail-pulling side of the hammer in there as well, and using both tools, pry the strip completely apart from the main slab each strip still with the nails in it - but none of them broken - this results in 2 things, both positive:

1. This is a very easy method to separate the strips apart (compared to the previous attempts at least). it proved to be somewhat fast, and methodical.
2. Now that the nails are only driven through 1 laminated strip (compared to 2.5) there is much less surface contact between nail and wood, and less friction and resistance once it come to pulling the nail out. What more -the tip of the nail is now accessible, and can be hammered out whereas before I had to DIG under the head of the nail and by doing that also messed up the maple strips.
Rectangle Parallel Symmetry


Wood Rectangle Natural material Composite material Gas


So after only a couple of hours I was able to release all of the strips that will contribute to the dog hole strip and to the buffer between the dog holes and the skirt. I also started cleaning and flattening the area under the top where it'll rest on the legs (so far only did the right side):
Wood Wood stain Rectangle Hardwood Flooring


as you can see, the underside of the top is covered with tar looking layer (I guess it was used in the bowling alley to protect against moisture or leaks through the floors). I used a scraper to clean as much of it as I could before moving to the planer. as you can see, there is a price to pay as it completely marred my #5 planer - this is one of those times that I'm really glad I don't have a $300 plane… as this would really have pissed me off:
Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Font


luckily, cleaning the scraper is easy enough, and restoring the buck-bros plane would not take much time and effort. a much easier process than restoring a router bit - and the reason why I did not (yet) use my router to clean and flatten this area.

So now I have the main slab according to my plan, and the strips of maple for the dog hole strip and buffer strip - things are starting to look better and better, and this was much easier than I had experienced earlier and then I expected things to be. In fact - I'm tempted to take all the strips apart, and completely remove all nails out of the entire top - but since there really is no need for this - I'm going to hold off on this desire. I got better things to do, and really want to see this workbench finished ASAP.

Moral of this installment - to take apart a bowling alley, and remove the nail - pry the strips apart prior to taking the nail out… make a whole different experience. from "heck no way" to "gimme some more please". now I actually believe I can utilize the other 2 slabs of bowling alley I have for other projects. :eek:)

and on a side note -I just received today the hardware for the vises from Lee-Valley. always good products. always good prices, always good service:
Rectangle Font Gas Box Fashion accessory
As a remodeling contractor, I have worked with reclaimed sections of bowling alley and I would not recommend them to anybody for fabricating a workbench.

That "dream" slab is a nightmare to work with. It is full of nails and you have to plan on disposing of a blade every few cuts.

It also sags side-to-side, so there has to be a proper structure under it that way.

Then there is the tar - crap.

It does make a very heavy and durable top in the end, but so do many other materials that are easier and take less time to handle.
 

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There is more than 1 way to skin a cat - not so with bowling alley floors though - finally success

Yes. Finally some light at the end of the tunnel, reverse thinking, and this project seems a bit more doable, and even not much trouble at all.

Originally I tried to get the (2.5" hardened) nails out by using a cat's paw and a hammer to pull each nail out of the 2.5 laminated hard-rock maple strips. I figured once I get all the nails out of the top strip, it'll just free it from the lamination, and be nails free… one strip at a time, until I have them all cleared out. I guess I was wrong. as you can see in this illustration - each nail is driven through 2.5 strips, and as such, it has a lot of surface contact between the nail and the wood creating the most friction and resistance this nail could have:
Rectangle Parallel Metal Shade Glass


After a full day of hard labor, aching muscles, and some major bruises on the back of my right hand from missing some hammer blows. I had nothing much to show for it, as most of the nails either got broken off, or didn't even budge to my miserable attempts.

Now that I have the base put together (dry fit) and the rough floor slab on top of it, I tried a different approach. What I did this time was pry each strip apart from the "main" slab by hammering a large all metal (body) screwdriver between the last strip and the rest of the slab to create a gap - placing a wooden wedge , and moving on - ending up separating the entire strip from the main slab just enough that I can fit the cat's paw L shape end into it, and pry it even more apart until I can slip also the nail-pulling side of the hammer in there as well, and using both tools, pry the strip completely apart from the main slab each strip still with the nails in it - but none of them broken - this results in 2 things, both positive:

1. This is a very easy method to separate the strips apart (compared to the previous attempts at least). it proved to be somewhat fast, and methodical.
2. Now that the nails are only driven through 1 laminated strip (compared to 2.5) there is much less surface contact between nail and wood, and less friction and resistance once it come to pulling the nail out. What more -the tip of the nail is now accessible, and can be hammered out whereas before I had to DIG under the head of the nail and by doing that also messed up the maple strips.
Rectangle Parallel Symmetry


Wood Rectangle Natural material Composite material Gas


So after only a couple of hours I was able to release all of the strips that will contribute to the dog hole strip and to the buffer between the dog holes and the skirt. I also started cleaning and flattening the area under the top where it'll rest on the legs (so far only did the right side):
Wood Wood stain Rectangle Hardwood Flooring


as you can see, the underside of the top is covered with tar looking layer (I guess it was used in the bowling alley to protect against moisture or leaks through the floors). I used a scraper to clean as much of it as I could before moving to the planer. as you can see, there is a price to pay as it completely marred my #5 planer - this is one of those times that I'm really glad I don't have a $300 plane… as this would really have pissed me off:
Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Font


luckily, cleaning the scraper is easy enough, and restoring the buck-bros plane would not take much time and effort. a much easier process than restoring a router bit - and the reason why I did not (yet) use my router to clean and flatten this area.

So now I have the main slab according to my plan, and the strips of maple for the dog hole strip and buffer strip - things are starting to look better and better, and this was much easier than I had experienced earlier and then I expected things to be. In fact - I'm tempted to take all the strips apart, and completely remove all nails out of the entire top - but since there really is no need for this - I'm going to hold off on this desire. I got better things to do, and really want to see this workbench finished ASAP.

Moral of this installment - to take apart a bowling alley, and remove the nail - pry the strips apart prior to taking the nail out… make a whole different experience. from "heck no way" to "gimme some more please". now I actually believe I can utilize the other 2 slabs of bowling alley I have for other projects. :eek:)

and on a side note -I just received today the hardware for the vises from Lee-Valley. always good products. always good prices, always good service:
Rectangle Font Gas Box Fashion accessory
Cool! I want to see how that turns out. Good luck, with both methods.
 

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Discussion Starter · #98 ·
There is more than 1 way to skin a cat - not so with bowling alley floors though - finally success

Yes. Finally some light at the end of the tunnel, reverse thinking, and this project seems a bit more doable, and even not much trouble at all.

Originally I tried to get the (2.5" hardened) nails out by using a cat's paw and a hammer to pull each nail out of the 2.5 laminated hard-rock maple strips. I figured once I get all the nails out of the top strip, it'll just free it from the lamination, and be nails free… one strip at a time, until I have them all cleared out. I guess I was wrong. as you can see in this illustration - each nail is driven through 2.5 strips, and as such, it has a lot of surface contact between the nail and the wood creating the most friction and resistance this nail could have:
Rectangle Parallel Metal Shade Glass


After a full day of hard labor, aching muscles, and some major bruises on the back of my right hand from missing some hammer blows. I had nothing much to show for it, as most of the nails either got broken off, or didn't even budge to my miserable attempts.

Now that I have the base put together (dry fit) and the rough floor slab on top of it, I tried a different approach. What I did this time was pry each strip apart from the "main" slab by hammering a large all metal (body) screwdriver between the last strip and the rest of the slab to create a gap - placing a wooden wedge , and moving on - ending up separating the entire strip from the main slab just enough that I can fit the cat's paw L shape end into it, and pry it even more apart until I can slip also the nail-pulling side of the hammer in there as well, and using both tools, pry the strip completely apart from the main slab each strip still with the nails in it - but none of them broken - this results in 2 things, both positive:

1. This is a very easy method to separate the strips apart (compared to the previous attempts at least). it proved to be somewhat fast, and methodical.
2. Now that the nails are only driven through 1 laminated strip (compared to 2.5) there is much less surface contact between nail and wood, and less friction and resistance once it come to pulling the nail out. What more -the tip of the nail is now accessible, and can be hammered out whereas before I had to DIG under the head of the nail and by doing that also messed up the maple strips.
Rectangle Parallel Symmetry


Wood Rectangle Natural material Composite material Gas


So after only a couple of hours I was able to release all of the strips that will contribute to the dog hole strip and to the buffer between the dog holes and the skirt. I also started cleaning and flattening the area under the top where it'll rest on the legs (so far only did the right side):
Wood Wood stain Rectangle Hardwood Flooring


as you can see, the underside of the top is covered with tar looking layer (I guess it was used in the bowling alley to protect against moisture or leaks through the floors). I used a scraper to clean as much of it as I could before moving to the planer. as you can see, there is a price to pay as it completely marred my #5 planer - this is one of those times that I'm really glad I don't have a $300 plane… as this would really have pissed me off:
Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Font


luckily, cleaning the scraper is easy enough, and restoring the buck-bros plane would not take much time and effort. a much easier process than restoring a router bit - and the reason why I did not (yet) use my router to clean and flatten this area.

So now I have the main slab according to my plan, and the strips of maple for the dog hole strip and buffer strip - things are starting to look better and better, and this was much easier than I had experienced earlier and then I expected things to be. In fact - I'm tempted to take all the strips apart, and completely remove all nails out of the entire top - but since there really is no need for this - I'm going to hold off on this desire. I got better things to do, and really want to see this workbench finished ASAP.

Moral of this installment - to take apart a bowling alley, and remove the nail - pry the strips apart prior to taking the nail out… make a whole different experience. from "heck no way" to "gimme some more please". now I actually believe I can utilize the other 2 slabs of bowling alley I have for other projects. :eek:)

and on a side note -I just received today the hardware for the vises from Lee-Valley. always good products. always good prices, always good service:
Rectangle Font Gas Box Fashion accessory
Indeed Todd, it's somewhat of a nightmare to work with. I think once you figure out how to get those nails out - it makes things much easier - still a bit of work, but not as bad, and not as destructive on tools. we'll see how the tar will come off with the wheel brush once I get to it.

you mentioned that the material sags side-to-side. do you mean lengthwise over the long grain? or widthwise over the laminations? I have an under-top support that will help control the sagging widthwise. but nothing for the lengthwise possibility. I don't recall seeing GaryKs' and Karsons' benches having support lengthwise though either, and haven't heard from neither of them of any sagging issues. but something to consider in the long run.
 

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There is more than 1 way to skin a cat - not so with bowling alley floors though - finally success

Yes. Finally some light at the end of the tunnel, reverse thinking, and this project seems a bit more doable, and even not much trouble at all.

Originally I tried to get the (2.5" hardened) nails out by using a cat's paw and a hammer to pull each nail out of the 2.5 laminated hard-rock maple strips. I figured once I get all the nails out of the top strip, it'll just free it from the lamination, and be nails free… one strip at a time, until I have them all cleared out. I guess I was wrong. as you can see in this illustration - each nail is driven through 2.5 strips, and as such, it has a lot of surface contact between the nail and the wood creating the most friction and resistance this nail could have:
Rectangle Parallel Metal Shade Glass


After a full day of hard labor, aching muscles, and some major bruises on the back of my right hand from missing some hammer blows. I had nothing much to show for it, as most of the nails either got broken off, or didn't even budge to my miserable attempts.

Now that I have the base put together (dry fit) and the rough floor slab on top of it, I tried a different approach. What I did this time was pry each strip apart from the "main" slab by hammering a large all metal (body) screwdriver between the last strip and the rest of the slab to create a gap - placing a wooden wedge , and moving on - ending up separating the entire strip from the main slab just enough that I can fit the cat's paw L shape end into it, and pry it even more apart until I can slip also the nail-pulling side of the hammer in there as well, and using both tools, pry the strip completely apart from the main slab each strip still with the nails in it - but none of them broken - this results in 2 things, both positive:

1. This is a very easy method to separate the strips apart (compared to the previous attempts at least). it proved to be somewhat fast, and methodical.
2. Now that the nails are only driven through 1 laminated strip (compared to 2.5) there is much less surface contact between nail and wood, and less friction and resistance once it come to pulling the nail out. What more -the tip of the nail is now accessible, and can be hammered out whereas before I had to DIG under the head of the nail and by doing that also messed up the maple strips.
Rectangle Parallel Symmetry


Wood Rectangle Natural material Composite material Gas


So after only a couple of hours I was able to release all of the strips that will contribute to the dog hole strip and to the buffer between the dog holes and the skirt. I also started cleaning and flattening the area under the top where it'll rest on the legs (so far only did the right side):
Wood Wood stain Rectangle Hardwood Flooring


as you can see, the underside of the top is covered with tar looking layer (I guess it was used in the bowling alley to protect against moisture or leaks through the floors). I used a scraper to clean as much of it as I could before moving to the planer. as you can see, there is a price to pay as it completely marred my #5 planer - this is one of those times that I'm really glad I don't have a $300 plane… as this would really have pissed me off:
Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Font


luckily, cleaning the scraper is easy enough, and restoring the buck-bros plane would not take much time and effort. a much easier process than restoring a router bit - and the reason why I did not (yet) use my router to clean and flatten this area.

So now I have the main slab according to my plan, and the strips of maple for the dog hole strip and buffer strip - things are starting to look better and better, and this was much easier than I had experienced earlier and then I expected things to be. In fact - I'm tempted to take all the strips apart, and completely remove all nails out of the entire top - but since there really is no need for this - I'm going to hold off on this desire. I got better things to do, and really want to see this workbench finished ASAP.

Moral of this installment - to take apart a bowling alley, and remove the nail - pry the strips apart prior to taking the nail out… make a whole different experience. from "heck no way" to "gimme some more please". now I actually believe I can utilize the other 2 slabs of bowling alley I have for other projects. :eek:)

and on a side note -I just received today the hardware for the vises from Lee-Valley. always good products. always good prices, always good service:
Rectangle Font Gas Box Fashion accessory
I have to agree with Todd….My buddy has a garage full of bowling alley sections he salvaged, over 15 years ago..and it still sits there…nobody wants it. It would seem to me that aside from the cost, it would be much easier to just laminate a bench top from some maple, or other suitable wood. I thought about doing the same thing you are Purp, and he would give me the alley sections for free…but after I looked them over and thought it through I said thanks but no thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #100 ·
There is more than 1 way to skin a cat - not so with bowling alley floors though - finally success

Yes. Finally some light at the end of the tunnel, reverse thinking, and this project seems a bit more doable, and even not much trouble at all.

Originally I tried to get the (2.5" hardened) nails out by using a cat's paw and a hammer to pull each nail out of the 2.5 laminated hard-rock maple strips. I figured once I get all the nails out of the top strip, it'll just free it from the lamination, and be nails free… one strip at a time, until I have them all cleared out. I guess I was wrong. as you can see in this illustration - each nail is driven through 2.5 strips, and as such, it has a lot of surface contact between the nail and the wood creating the most friction and resistance this nail could have:
Rectangle Parallel Metal Shade Glass


After a full day of hard labor, aching muscles, and some major bruises on the back of my right hand from missing some hammer blows. I had nothing much to show for it, as most of the nails either got broken off, or didn't even budge to my miserable attempts.

Now that I have the base put together (dry fit) and the rough floor slab on top of it, I tried a different approach. What I did this time was pry each strip apart from the "main" slab by hammering a large all metal (body) screwdriver between the last strip and the rest of the slab to create a gap - placing a wooden wedge , and moving on - ending up separating the entire strip from the main slab just enough that I can fit the cat's paw L shape end into it, and pry it even more apart until I can slip also the nail-pulling side of the hammer in there as well, and using both tools, pry the strip completely apart from the main slab each strip still with the nails in it - but none of them broken - this results in 2 things, both positive:

1. This is a very easy method to separate the strips apart (compared to the previous attempts at least). it proved to be somewhat fast, and methodical.
2. Now that the nails are only driven through 1 laminated strip (compared to 2.5) there is much less surface contact between nail and wood, and less friction and resistance once it come to pulling the nail out. What more -the tip of the nail is now accessible, and can be hammered out whereas before I had to DIG under the head of the nail and by doing that also messed up the maple strips.
Rectangle Parallel Symmetry


Wood Rectangle Natural material Composite material Gas


So after only a couple of hours I was able to release all of the strips that will contribute to the dog hole strip and to the buffer between the dog holes and the skirt. I also started cleaning and flattening the area under the top where it'll rest on the legs (so far only did the right side):
Wood Wood stain Rectangle Hardwood Flooring


as you can see, the underside of the top is covered with tar looking layer (I guess it was used in the bowling alley to protect against moisture or leaks through the floors). I used a scraper to clean as much of it as I could before moving to the planer. as you can see, there is a price to pay as it completely marred my #5 planer - this is one of those times that I'm really glad I don't have a $300 plane… as this would really have pissed me off:
Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Font


luckily, cleaning the scraper is easy enough, and restoring the buck-bros plane would not take much time and effort. a much easier process than restoring a router bit - and the reason why I did not (yet) use my router to clean and flatten this area.

So now I have the main slab according to my plan, and the strips of maple for the dog hole strip and buffer strip - things are starting to look better and better, and this was much easier than I had experienced earlier and then I expected things to be. In fact - I'm tempted to take all the strips apart, and completely remove all nails out of the entire top - but since there really is no need for this - I'm going to hold off on this desire. I got better things to do, and really want to see this workbench finished ASAP.

Moral of this installment - to take apart a bowling alley, and remove the nail - pry the strips apart prior to taking the nail out… make a whole different experience. from "heck no way" to "gimme some more please". now I actually believe I can utilize the other 2 slabs of bowling alley I have for other projects. :eek:)

and on a side note -I just received today the hardware for the vises from Lee-Valley. always good products. always good prices, always good service:
Rectangle Font Gas Box Fashion accessory
I also agree with Todd… lol. If I had to do this again knowing what I know today, I'd go to the lumberyard and buy new material.

But at this point - I already have the material salvaged, it's in very good condition, I already have the experience to handle it. And as Todd wrote - it's a "Dream" top, as I always wanted to utilize salvaged material such as this for such a good purpose. Also, agree to it or not - this adds one hell of a story to this bench.
 

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