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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Bookcase entry - Challenge04

I had already started working on the design for this bookcase when I became aware of this contest. Realizing that my built-in application (designed to conceal ductwork) was quite different from the needs of most people, I slightly redesigned the crown to make it a free-standing bookcase (although, for the sake of safety, I would still attach it to a wall if I were to place this one in my home).



The close-up of the crown shows the area for built-in lighting which is simply a 36" fluorescent striplight with a drop-in panel to hide it. This crown is 18" deep by 12" high. The crown molding at the top is standard stock approximately 3¼". The lower crown molding is also standard stock approximately 2¼". The front of the crown is decorated with a carved onlay.



The two corner pieces at the bottom of the crown are simply 1-3/8" x 2¼" with a series of beaded roundover and cove cuts with the router.



The top doors could be plain glass or a single pane of textured glass. (I'm planning to make leaded glass panels to insert into the doors, so for strength I might build the top doors from thicker oak with a rabbeted inset so they protrude the same ¾" as the lower raised panel oak doors.)



The proportions used on the bookcase were chosen to complement the kitchen island/bookcase which I recently completed (I hope to eventually blog it); to allow for repeating similar glasswork as the dining cabinets in the same room; and to fill the available space below the ductwork.

The bookcase is 38" wide by 12" deep by 72" high. (The 12" depth was chosen so the approximately 10½" interior depth is sufficient for a 3-ring binder but not so deep as to lose smaller books in the back.)

The seam between the crown and bookcase is concealed with ¾" half-round molding. (I'm using this molding on mine to allow for about ¼" gap between crown and bookcase so that I can slide the bookcase under the crown which is attached to ductwork enclosure and wall.)

The face frame is joined with pocket holes, then joined to the sides with splined miters. One shelf in the lower cabinet is adjustable, as are two shelves in the top portion. The doors and side panels are routed using rail/stile and raised panel bits.



This is a view of the finished bookcase which will be stained a medium oak color to match my cabinets.

"SketchUp file": http://www.box.net/shared/5nis13jnog
 

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Bookcase entry - Challenge04

I had already started working on the design for this bookcase when I became aware of this contest. Realizing that my built-in application (designed to conceal ductwork) was quite different from the needs of most people, I slightly redesigned the crown to make it a free-standing bookcase (although, for the sake of safety, I would still attach it to a wall if I were to place this one in my home).



The close-up of the crown shows the area for built-in lighting which is simply a 36" fluorescent striplight with a drop-in panel to hide it. This crown is 18" deep by 12" high. The crown molding at the top is standard stock approximately 3¼". The lower crown molding is also standard stock approximately 2¼". The front of the crown is decorated with a carved onlay.



The two corner pieces at the bottom of the crown are simply 1-3/8" x 2¼" with a series of beaded roundover and cove cuts with the router.



The top doors could be plain glass or a single pane of textured glass. (I'm planning to make leaded glass panels to insert into the doors, so for strength I might build the top doors from thicker oak with a rabbeted inset so they protrude the same ¾" as the lower raised panel oak doors.)



The proportions used on the bookcase were chosen to complement the kitchen island/bookcase which I recently completed (I hope to eventually blog it); to allow for repeating similar glasswork as the dining cabinets in the same room; and to fill the available space below the ductwork.

The bookcase is 38" wide by 12" deep by 72" high. (The 12" depth was chosen so the approximately 10½" interior depth is sufficient for a 3-ring binder but not so deep as to lose smaller books in the back.)

The seam between the crown and bookcase is concealed with ¾" half-round molding. (I'm using this molding on mine to allow for about ¼" gap between crown and bookcase so that I can slide the bookcase under the crown which is attached to ductwork enclosure and wall.)

The face frame is joined with pocket holes, then joined to the sides with splined miters. One shelf in the lower cabinet is adjustable, as are two shelves in the top portion. The doors and side panels are routed using rail/stile and raised panel bits.



This is a view of the finished bookcase which will be stained a medium oak color to match my cabinets.

"SketchUp file": http://www.box.net/shared/5nis13jnog
looks like a good challenge.
 

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Bookcase entry - Challenge04

I had already started working on the design for this bookcase when I became aware of this contest. Realizing that my built-in application (designed to conceal ductwork) was quite different from the needs of most people, I slightly redesigned the crown to make it a free-standing bookcase (although, for the sake of safety, I would still attach it to a wall if I were to place this one in my home).



The close-up of the crown shows the area for built-in lighting which is simply a 36" fluorescent striplight with a drop-in panel to hide it. This crown is 18" deep by 12" high. The crown molding at the top is standard stock approximately 3¼". The lower crown molding is also standard stock approximately 2¼". The front of the crown is decorated with a carved onlay.



The two corner pieces at the bottom of the crown are simply 1-3/8" x 2¼" with a series of beaded roundover and cove cuts with the router.



The top doors could be plain glass or a single pane of textured glass. (I'm planning to make leaded glass panels to insert into the doors, so for strength I might build the top doors from thicker oak with a rabbeted inset so they protrude the same ¾" as the lower raised panel oak doors.)



The proportions used on the bookcase were chosen to complement the kitchen island/bookcase which I recently completed (I hope to eventually blog it); to allow for repeating similar glasswork as the dining cabinets in the same room; and to fill the available space below the ductwork.

The bookcase is 38" wide by 12" deep by 72" high. (The 12" depth was chosen so the approximately 10½" interior depth is sufficient for a 3-ring binder but not so deep as to lose smaller books in the back.)

The seam between the crown and bookcase is concealed with ¾" half-round molding. (I'm using this molding on mine to allow for about ¼" gap between crown and bookcase so that I can slide the bookcase under the crown which is attached to ductwork enclosure and wall.)

The face frame is joined with pocket holes, then joined to the sides with splined miters. One shelf in the lower cabinet is adjustable, as are two shelves in the top portion. The doors and side panels are routed using rail/stile and raised panel bits.



This is a view of the finished bookcase which will be stained a medium oak color to match my cabinets.

"SketchUp file": http://www.box.net/shared/5nis13jnog
I like the lighting idea. It's the first thing I thought of when I saw the overhang.
 

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Bookcase entry - Challenge04

I had already started working on the design for this bookcase when I became aware of this contest. Realizing that my built-in application (designed to conceal ductwork) was quite different from the needs of most people, I slightly redesigned the crown to make it a free-standing bookcase (although, for the sake of safety, I would still attach it to a wall if I were to place this one in my home).



The close-up of the crown shows the area for built-in lighting which is simply a 36" fluorescent striplight with a drop-in panel to hide it. This crown is 18" deep by 12" high. The crown molding at the top is standard stock approximately 3¼". The lower crown molding is also standard stock approximately 2¼". The front of the crown is decorated with a carved onlay.



The two corner pieces at the bottom of the crown are simply 1-3/8" x 2¼" with a series of beaded roundover and cove cuts with the router.



The top doors could be plain glass or a single pane of textured glass. (I'm planning to make leaded glass panels to insert into the doors, so for strength I might build the top doors from thicker oak with a rabbeted inset so they protrude the same ¾" as the lower raised panel oak doors.)



The proportions used on the bookcase were chosen to complement the kitchen island/bookcase which I recently completed (I hope to eventually blog it); to allow for repeating similar glasswork as the dining cabinets in the same room; and to fill the available space below the ductwork.

The bookcase is 38" wide by 12" deep by 72" high. (The 12" depth was chosen so the approximately 10½" interior depth is sufficient for a 3-ring binder but not so deep as to lose smaller books in the back.)

The seam between the crown and bookcase is concealed with ¾" half-round molding. (I'm using this molding on mine to allow for about ¼" gap between crown and bookcase so that I can slide the bookcase under the crown which is attached to ductwork enclosure and wall.)

The face frame is joined with pocket holes, then joined to the sides with splined miters. One shelf in the lower cabinet is adjustable, as are two shelves in the top portion. The doors and side panels are routed using rail/stile and raised panel bits.



This is a view of the finished bookcase which will be stained a medium oak color to match my cabinets.

"SketchUp file": http://www.box.net/shared/5nis13jnog
Great design
 

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Bookcase entry - Challenge04

I had already started working on the design for this bookcase when I became aware of this contest. Realizing that my built-in application (designed to conceal ductwork) was quite different from the needs of most people, I slightly redesigned the crown to make it a free-standing bookcase (although, for the sake of safety, I would still attach it to a wall if I were to place this one in my home).



The close-up of the crown shows the area for built-in lighting which is simply a 36" fluorescent striplight with a drop-in panel to hide it. This crown is 18" deep by 12" high. The crown molding at the top is standard stock approximately 3¼". The lower crown molding is also standard stock approximately 2¼". The front of the crown is decorated with a carved onlay.



The two corner pieces at the bottom of the crown are simply 1-3/8" x 2¼" with a series of beaded roundover and cove cuts with the router.



The top doors could be plain glass or a single pane of textured glass. (I'm planning to make leaded glass panels to insert into the doors, so for strength I might build the top doors from thicker oak with a rabbeted inset so they protrude the same ¾" as the lower raised panel oak doors.)



The proportions used on the bookcase were chosen to complement the kitchen island/bookcase which I recently completed (I hope to eventually blog it); to allow for repeating similar glasswork as the dining cabinets in the same room; and to fill the available space below the ductwork.

The bookcase is 38" wide by 12" deep by 72" high. (The 12" depth was chosen so the approximately 10½" interior depth is sufficient for a 3-ring binder but not so deep as to lose smaller books in the back.)

The seam between the crown and bookcase is concealed with ¾" half-round molding. (I'm using this molding on mine to allow for about ¼" gap between crown and bookcase so that I can slide the bookcase under the crown which is attached to ductwork enclosure and wall.)

The face frame is joined with pocket holes, then joined to the sides with splined miters. One shelf in the lower cabinet is adjustable, as are two shelves in the top portion. The doors and side panels are routed using rail/stile and raised panel bits.



This is a view of the finished bookcase which will be stained a medium oak color to match my cabinets.

"SketchUp file": http://www.box.net/shared/5nis13jnog
That is so beautiful it should go in a church. It's an awesome design.
 

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Bookcase entry - Challenge04

I had already started working on the design for this bookcase when I became aware of this contest. Realizing that my built-in application (designed to conceal ductwork) was quite different from the needs of most people, I slightly redesigned the crown to make it a free-standing bookcase (although, for the sake of safety, I would still attach it to a wall if I were to place this one in my home).



The close-up of the crown shows the area for built-in lighting which is simply a 36" fluorescent striplight with a drop-in panel to hide it. This crown is 18" deep by 12" high. The crown molding at the top is standard stock approximately 3¼". The lower crown molding is also standard stock approximately 2¼". The front of the crown is decorated with a carved onlay.



The two corner pieces at the bottom of the crown are simply 1-3/8" x 2¼" with a series of beaded roundover and cove cuts with the router.



The top doors could be plain glass or a single pane of textured glass. (I'm planning to make leaded glass panels to insert into the doors, so for strength I might build the top doors from thicker oak with a rabbeted inset so they protrude the same ¾" as the lower raised panel oak doors.)



The proportions used on the bookcase were chosen to complement the kitchen island/bookcase which I recently completed (I hope to eventually blog it); to allow for repeating similar glasswork as the dining cabinets in the same room; and to fill the available space below the ductwork.

The bookcase is 38" wide by 12" deep by 72" high. (The 12" depth was chosen so the approximately 10½" interior depth is sufficient for a 3-ring binder but not so deep as to lose smaller books in the back.)

The seam between the crown and bookcase is concealed with ¾" half-round molding. (I'm using this molding on mine to allow for about ¼" gap between crown and bookcase so that I can slide the bookcase under the crown which is attached to ductwork enclosure and wall.)

The face frame is joined with pocket holes, then joined to the sides with splined miters. One shelf in the lower cabinet is adjustable, as are two shelves in the top portion. The doors and side panels are routed using rail/stile and raised panel bits.



This is a view of the finished bookcase which will be stained a medium oak color to match my cabinets.

"SketchUp file": http://www.box.net/shared/5nis13jnog
This is a nice design and I, too, like the lighting detail. The onlay adds some visual interest to the piece as well.

Nice entry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Bookcase entry - Challenge04

I had already started working on the design for this bookcase when I became aware of this contest. Realizing that my built-in application (designed to conceal ductwork) was quite different from the needs of most people, I slightly redesigned the crown to make it a free-standing bookcase (although, for the sake of safety, I would still attach it to a wall if I were to place this one in my home).



The close-up of the crown shows the area for built-in lighting which is simply a 36" fluorescent striplight with a drop-in panel to hide it. This crown is 18" deep by 12" high. The crown molding at the top is standard stock approximately 3¼". The lower crown molding is also standard stock approximately 2¼". The front of the crown is decorated with a carved onlay.



The two corner pieces at the bottom of the crown are simply 1-3/8" x 2¼" with a series of beaded roundover and cove cuts with the router.



The top doors could be plain glass or a single pane of textured glass. (I'm planning to make leaded glass panels to insert into the doors, so for strength I might build the top doors from thicker oak with a rabbeted inset so they protrude the same ¾" as the lower raised panel oak doors.)



The proportions used on the bookcase were chosen to complement the kitchen island/bookcase which I recently completed (I hope to eventually blog it); to allow for repeating similar glasswork as the dining cabinets in the same room; and to fill the available space below the ductwork.

The bookcase is 38" wide by 12" deep by 72" high. (The 12" depth was chosen so the approximately 10½" interior depth is sufficient for a 3-ring binder but not so deep as to lose smaller books in the back.)

The seam between the crown and bookcase is concealed with ¾" half-round molding. (I'm using this molding on mine to allow for about ¼" gap between crown and bookcase so that I can slide the bookcase under the crown which is attached to ductwork enclosure and wall.)

The face frame is joined with pocket holes, then joined to the sides with splined miters. One shelf in the lower cabinet is adjustable, as are two shelves in the top portion. The doors and side panels are routed using rail/stile and raised panel bits.



This is a view of the finished bookcase which will be stained a medium oak color to match my cabinets.

"SketchUp file": http://www.box.net/shared/5nis13jnog
Thanks so much for all the encouraging remarks. This certainly is one friendly group of woodworkers!
 

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Bookcase entry - Challenge04

I had already started working on the design for this bookcase when I became aware of this contest. Realizing that my built-in application (designed to conceal ductwork) was quite different from the needs of most people, I slightly redesigned the crown to make it a free-standing bookcase (although, for the sake of safety, I would still attach it to a wall if I were to place this one in my home).



The close-up of the crown shows the area for built-in lighting which is simply a 36" fluorescent striplight with a drop-in panel to hide it. This crown is 18" deep by 12" high. The crown molding at the top is standard stock approximately 3¼". The lower crown molding is also standard stock approximately 2¼". The front of the crown is decorated with a carved onlay.



The two corner pieces at the bottom of the crown are simply 1-3/8" x 2¼" with a series of beaded roundover and cove cuts with the router.



The top doors could be plain glass or a single pane of textured glass. (I'm planning to make leaded glass panels to insert into the doors, so for strength I might build the top doors from thicker oak with a rabbeted inset so they protrude the same ¾" as the lower raised panel oak doors.)



The proportions used on the bookcase were chosen to complement the kitchen island/bookcase which I recently completed (I hope to eventually blog it); to allow for repeating similar glasswork as the dining cabinets in the same room; and to fill the available space below the ductwork.

The bookcase is 38" wide by 12" deep by 72" high. (The 12" depth was chosen so the approximately 10½" interior depth is sufficient for a 3-ring binder but not so deep as to lose smaller books in the back.)

The seam between the crown and bookcase is concealed with ¾" half-round molding. (I'm using this molding on mine to allow for about ¼" gap between crown and bookcase so that I can slide the bookcase under the crown which is attached to ductwork enclosure and wall.)

The face frame is joined with pocket holes, then joined to the sides with splined miters. One shelf in the lower cabinet is adjustable, as are two shelves in the top portion. The doors and side panels are routed using rail/stile and raised panel bits.



This is a view of the finished bookcase which will be stained a medium oak color to match my cabinets.

"SketchUp file": http://www.box.net/shared/5nis13jnog
That is a very nice design!

(I've GOT to get sketchup and learn to use it!)
 

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Bookcase entry - Challenge04

I had already started working on the design for this bookcase when I became aware of this contest. Realizing that my built-in application (designed to conceal ductwork) was quite different from the needs of most people, I slightly redesigned the crown to make it a free-standing bookcase (although, for the sake of safety, I would still attach it to a wall if I were to place this one in my home).



The close-up of the crown shows the area for built-in lighting which is simply a 36" fluorescent striplight with a drop-in panel to hide it. This crown is 18" deep by 12" high. The crown molding at the top is standard stock approximately 3¼". The lower crown molding is also standard stock approximately 2¼". The front of the crown is decorated with a carved onlay.



The two corner pieces at the bottom of the crown are simply 1-3/8" x 2¼" with a series of beaded roundover and cove cuts with the router.



The top doors could be plain glass or a single pane of textured glass. (I'm planning to make leaded glass panels to insert into the doors, so for strength I might build the top doors from thicker oak with a rabbeted inset so they protrude the same ¾" as the lower raised panel oak doors.)



The proportions used on the bookcase were chosen to complement the kitchen island/bookcase which I recently completed (I hope to eventually blog it); to allow for repeating similar glasswork as the dining cabinets in the same room; and to fill the available space below the ductwork.

The bookcase is 38" wide by 12" deep by 72" high. (The 12" depth was chosen so the approximately 10½" interior depth is sufficient for a 3-ring binder but not so deep as to lose smaller books in the back.)

The seam between the crown and bookcase is concealed with ¾" half-round molding. (I'm using this molding on mine to allow for about ¼" gap between crown and bookcase so that I can slide the bookcase under the crown which is attached to ductwork enclosure and wall.)

The face frame is joined with pocket holes, then joined to the sides with splined miters. One shelf in the lower cabinet is adjustable, as are two shelves in the top portion. The doors and side panels are routed using rail/stile and raised panel bits.



This is a view of the finished bookcase which will be stained a medium oak color to match my cabinets.

"SketchUp file": http://www.box.net/shared/5nis13jnog
stunning!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Building the "crown"

This bookcase was designed to camouflage ductwork and to replace a portion of the book storage from a 10' x 6' shelving unit that we removed to remodel our dining room.

The next three pictures show the ductwork and the steps from paneling to painted drywall. The horizontal ducts were covered in oak with rails and stiles cut to enclose lighting panels to match the kitchen woodwork and lighting (not shown, around the corner to the left).







Next I began working on the crown to enclose the furnace air return. Because I didn't wish to attempt using my husband's spray rig for finishing the crown and I doubted that I could successfully finish it with the onlay glued in place, I decided to trace the onlay onto parchment covered with masking tape, cut it out, then peel and stick the masking tape to the oak crown.





After staining and varnishing the crown and onlay, I removed the tape, then glued and clamped the onlay in place, using boards cushioned with packaging wrap to keep from damaging the onlay. (I drilled a tiny little hole in an inconspicuous place on each end and pinned the onlay in place, leaving the pins proud so I could pull them out when the glue dried.)



The onlay was slightly warped so I was concerned about getting it to lie flat.



I added a 3¼" standard stock crown molding to finish it off at the ceiling.



I have no idea what kind of wood the onlay is, but it was within my budget so if anyone asks why I didn't use oak, I can just say that I was going for contrast!

Next I built the carcass with raised panels on each side. I attached the front to the sides using splined miters. The face frame was assembled using pocket-hole screws. (I didn't remember to take photos at this step.)

[All this uploading takes forever with dial-up, but I'll try to continue this blog in the near future.]
 

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Building the "crown"

This bookcase was designed to camouflage ductwork and to replace a portion of the book storage from a 10' x 6' shelving unit that we removed to remodel our dining room.

The next three pictures show the ductwork and the steps from paneling to painted drywall. The horizontal ducts were covered in oak with rails and stiles cut to enclose lighting panels to match the kitchen woodwork and lighting (not shown, around the corner to the left).







Next I began working on the crown to enclose the furnace air return. Because I didn't wish to attempt using my husband's spray rig for finishing the crown and I doubted that I could successfully finish it with the onlay glued in place, I decided to trace the onlay onto parchment covered with masking tape, cut it out, then peel and stick the masking tape to the oak crown.





After staining and varnishing the crown and onlay, I removed the tape, then glued and clamped the onlay in place, using boards cushioned with packaging wrap to keep from damaging the onlay. (I drilled a tiny little hole in an inconspicuous place on each end and pinned the onlay in place, leaving the pins proud so I could pull them out when the glue dried.)



The onlay was slightly warped so I was concerned about getting it to lie flat.



I added a 3¼" standard stock crown molding to finish it off at the ceiling.



I have no idea what kind of wood the onlay is, but it was within my budget so if anyone asks why I didn't use oak, I can just say that I was going for contrast!

Next I built the carcass with raised panels on each side. I attached the front to the sides using splined miters. The face frame was assembled using pocket-hole screws. (I didn't remember to take photos at this step.)

[All this uploading takes forever with dial-up, but I'll try to continue this blog in the near future.]
That looks great! Ah, the joys of loading pictures on dialup!
 

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Building the "crown"

This bookcase was designed to camouflage ductwork and to replace a portion of the book storage from a 10' x 6' shelving unit that we removed to remodel our dining room.

The next three pictures show the ductwork and the steps from paneling to painted drywall. The horizontal ducts were covered in oak with rails and stiles cut to enclose lighting panels to match the kitchen woodwork and lighting (not shown, around the corner to the left).







Next I began working on the crown to enclose the furnace air return. Because I didn't wish to attempt using my husband's spray rig for finishing the crown and I doubted that I could successfully finish it with the onlay glued in place, I decided to trace the onlay onto parchment covered with masking tape, cut it out, then peel and stick the masking tape to the oak crown.





After staining and varnishing the crown and onlay, I removed the tape, then glued and clamped the onlay in place, using boards cushioned with packaging wrap to keep from damaging the onlay. (I drilled a tiny little hole in an inconspicuous place on each end and pinned the onlay in place, leaving the pins proud so I could pull them out when the glue dried.)



The onlay was slightly warped so I was concerned about getting it to lie flat.



I added a 3¼" standard stock crown molding to finish it off at the ceiling.



I have no idea what kind of wood the onlay is, but it was within my budget so if anyone asks why I didn't use oak, I can just say that I was going for contrast!

Next I built the carcass with raised panels on each side. I attached the front to the sides using splined miters. The face frame was assembled using pocket-hole screws. (I didn't remember to take photos at this step.)

[All this uploading takes forever with dial-up, but I'll try to continue this blog in the near future.]
Not bad for a Lightweight. ;o) Great start, I'll be looking forward to seeing it finished.
 

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Building the "crown"

This bookcase was designed to camouflage ductwork and to replace a portion of the book storage from a 10' x 6' shelving unit that we removed to remodel our dining room.

The next three pictures show the ductwork and the steps from paneling to painted drywall. The horizontal ducts were covered in oak with rails and stiles cut to enclose lighting panels to match the kitchen woodwork and lighting (not shown, around the corner to the left).







Next I began working on the crown to enclose the furnace air return. Because I didn't wish to attempt using my husband's spray rig for finishing the crown and I doubted that I could successfully finish it with the onlay glued in place, I decided to trace the onlay onto parchment covered with masking tape, cut it out, then peel and stick the masking tape to the oak crown.





After staining and varnishing the crown and onlay, I removed the tape, then glued and clamped the onlay in place, using boards cushioned with packaging wrap to keep from damaging the onlay. (I drilled a tiny little hole in an inconspicuous place on each end and pinned the onlay in place, leaving the pins proud so I could pull them out when the glue dried.)



The onlay was slightly warped so I was concerned about getting it to lie flat.



I added a 3¼" standard stock crown molding to finish it off at the ceiling.



I have no idea what kind of wood the onlay is, but it was within my budget so if anyone asks why I didn't use oak, I can just say that I was going for contrast!

Next I built the carcass with raised panels on each side. I attached the front to the sides using splined miters. The face frame was assembled using pocket-hole screws. (I didn't remember to take photos at this step.)

[All this uploading takes forever with dial-up, but I'll try to continue this blog in the near future.]
dang that looks nice!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Building the lighting section

Building the lighting section was a little more challenging. I used a 2¼" stock crown molding to trim out the area where the fluorescent light would be. I needed a ledge on which the lighting panel could set, so I routed a narrow piece of oak using the rail bit and cut off the "lip" and glued it into a dado I cut into the back of the crown molding.



I also cut a dado into the main carcass and inserted a "lip" into it as well.



We want to be able to remove this bookcase without demolishing it if it is ever necessary in the future so I needed to make the main bookcase portion removable. To be able to install it, there needed to be a slight gap between the crown and the bookcase. My initial design showed a ¾" half-round molding. I decided it would not allow sufficient room for attaching it so I redesigned a slightly larger molding.

Here's the SketchUp model of the molding.



I made a small sample to see if it would tie the two parts together with enough room to attach it.



These are the steps I used to make the molding. After cutting a piece about 3¼" x 48" long to route the two pieces required: (1) Route the "tambours" on my horizontal router set-up.



(2) Use a ¼" core box bit to route on either side of each "tambour."



(3) Split the two moldings on the table saw and trim them to width.



To make the corner decorations on the crown, I started with a 1¼" x 1¼" x 8" piece of oak and followed these steps: (1) Taper the last half inch on either end at 45 degrees.



(2) Set the 1/8" beading bit ½" high and remove the pilot. (3) Set the stop, cut and rotate four times; then swap ends and repeat. (4) Set 1/8" core box bit 5/16" high. (5) Repeat step #3. (6) Set 1/8" beading bit 3/16" high. (7) Repeat step #3.





Now, I need to get a photo developed of the close-up of the completed lighting section so you can see how it turned out. That'll be my next blog.

Thanks for taking a look.
 

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Building the lighting section

Building the lighting section was a little more challenging. I used a 2¼" stock crown molding to trim out the area where the fluorescent light would be. I needed a ledge on which the lighting panel could set, so I routed a narrow piece of oak using the rail bit and cut off the "lip" and glued it into a dado I cut into the back of the crown molding.



I also cut a dado into the main carcass and inserted a "lip" into it as well.



We want to be able to remove this bookcase without demolishing it if it is ever necessary in the future so I needed to make the main bookcase portion removable. To be able to install it, there needed to be a slight gap between the crown and the bookcase. My initial design showed a ¾" half-round molding. I decided it would not allow sufficient room for attaching it so I redesigned a slightly larger molding.

Here's the SketchUp model of the molding.



I made a small sample to see if it would tie the two parts together with enough room to attach it.



These are the steps I used to make the molding. After cutting a piece about 3¼" x 48" long to route the two pieces required: (1) Route the "tambours" on my horizontal router set-up.



(2) Use a ¼" core box bit to route on either side of each "tambour."



(3) Split the two moldings on the table saw and trim them to width.



To make the corner decorations on the crown, I started with a 1¼" x 1¼" x 8" piece of oak and followed these steps: (1) Taper the last half inch on either end at 45 degrees.



(2) Set the 1/8" beading bit ½" high and remove the pilot. (3) Set the stop, cut and rotate four times; then swap ends and repeat. (4) Set 1/8" core box bit 5/16" high. (5) Repeat step #3. (6) Set 1/8" beading bit 3/16" high. (7) Repeat step #3.





Now, I need to get a photo developed of the close-up of the completed lighting section so you can see how it turned out. That'll be my next blog.

Thanks for taking a look.
Looking Really Great. Can't wait to see what's next!
 

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Building the lighting section

Building the lighting section was a little more challenging. I used a 2¼" stock crown molding to trim out the area where the fluorescent light would be. I needed a ledge on which the lighting panel could set, so I routed a narrow piece of oak using the rail bit and cut off the "lip" and glued it into a dado I cut into the back of the crown molding.



I also cut a dado into the main carcass and inserted a "lip" into it as well.



We want to be able to remove this bookcase without demolishing it if it is ever necessary in the future so I needed to make the main bookcase portion removable. To be able to install it, there needed to be a slight gap between the crown and the bookcase. My initial design showed a ¾" half-round molding. I decided it would not allow sufficient room for attaching it so I redesigned a slightly larger molding.

Here's the SketchUp model of the molding.



I made a small sample to see if it would tie the two parts together with enough room to attach it.



These are the steps I used to make the molding. After cutting a piece about 3¼" x 48" long to route the two pieces required: (1) Route the "tambours" on my horizontal router set-up.



(2) Use a ¼" core box bit to route on either side of each "tambour."



(3) Split the two moldings on the table saw and trim them to width.



To make the corner decorations on the crown, I started with a 1¼" x 1¼" x 8" piece of oak and followed these steps: (1) Taper the last half inch on either end at 45 degrees.



(2) Set the 1/8" beading bit ½" high and remove the pilot. (3) Set the stop, cut and rotate four times; then swap ends and repeat. (4) Set 1/8" core box bit 5/16" high. (5) Repeat step #3. (6) Set 1/8" beading bit 3/16" high. (7) Repeat step #3.





Now, I need to get a photo developed of the close-up of the completed lighting section so you can see how it turned out. That'll be my next blog.

Thanks for taking a look.
Nice work, great blog! Nice job making the moldings with all the different set ups.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
NEARLY COMPLETE



As it seems with every project, there are always set-backs. I was nearly finished except for the bottom doors when I ran out of stain. The paint store that custom-mixed the stain is 35 miles away so I decided to experiment with dye.



Well, not on the bookcase, but on my hair. Do you like the results? When I finally got the stain and finished the doors, I had only three hinges for the bottom doors. The top doors were made with an additional ¼" added to make the doors 1" thick which sets into the face frame by ¼". (This was done for added strength for the leaded glass I plan to make.) I had purchased the six top hinges, but there were only three bottom hinges (without the extra ¼" offset) at our local liquidator for 29 cents each or 4 for a $1.00. They have a few stores here in Wisconsin so I asked if they would check another store to see if they could match the hinge I was missing. My husband thought I was totally nuts for even asking but, PTL, they came through for me with the 29-cent hinge!

Here's the final result, minus the leaded glass I hope to eventually make for the top doors.





The last photo is taken looking toward the kitchen island which I finished at the beginning of this year. (Maybe some day I'll write a blog and show pictures of it, too.)

It has been three years of remodeling our kitchen, dining, and den . . . and it is actually nearing completion.

Thanks for taking a look!
 

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NEARLY COMPLETE



As it seems with every project, there are always set-backs. I was nearly finished except for the bottom doors when I ran out of stain. The paint store that custom-mixed the stain is 35 miles away so I decided to experiment with dye.



Well, not on the bookcase, but on my hair. Do you like the results? When I finally got the stain and finished the doors, I had only three hinges for the bottom doors. The top doors were made with an additional ¼" added to make the doors 1" thick which sets into the face frame by ¼". (This was done for added strength for the leaded glass I plan to make.) I had purchased the six top hinges, but there were only three bottom hinges (without the extra ¼" offset) at our local liquidator for 29 cents each or 4 for a $1.00. They have a few stores here in Wisconsin so I asked if they would check another store to see if they could match the hinge I was missing. My husband thought I was totally nuts for even asking but, PTL, they came through for me with the 29-cent hinge!

Here's the final result, minus the leaded glass I hope to eventually make for the top doors.





The last photo is taken looking toward the kitchen island which I finished at the beginning of this year. (Maybe some day I'll write a blog and show pictures of it, too.)

It has been three years of remodeling our kitchen, dining, and den . . . and it is actually nearing completion.

Thanks for taking a look!
Very nice is this our first Challenge04 completion
 

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NEARLY COMPLETE



As it seems with every project, there are always set-backs. I was nearly finished except for the bottom doors when I ran out of stain. The paint store that custom-mixed the stain is 35 miles away so I decided to experiment with dye.



Well, not on the bookcase, but on my hair. Do you like the results? When I finally got the stain and finished the doors, I had only three hinges for the bottom doors. The top doors were made with an additional ¼" added to make the doors 1" thick which sets into the face frame by ¼". (This was done for added strength for the leaded glass I plan to make.) I had purchased the six top hinges, but there were only three bottom hinges (without the extra ¼" offset) at our local liquidator for 29 cents each or 4 for a $1.00. They have a few stores here in Wisconsin so I asked if they would check another store to see if they could match the hinge I was missing. My husband thought I was totally nuts for even asking but, PTL, they came through for me with the 29-cent hinge!

Here's the final result, minus the leaded glass I hope to eventually make for the top doors.





The last photo is taken looking toward the kitchen island which I finished at the beginning of this year. (Maybe some day I'll write a blog and show pictures of it, too.)

It has been three years of remodeling our kitchen, dining, and den . . . and it is actually nearing completion.

Thanks for taking a look!
Beautiful Job! And nice score on the hinges!!
 

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230 Posts
NEARLY COMPLETE



As it seems with every project, there are always set-backs. I was nearly finished except for the bottom doors when I ran out of stain. The paint store that custom-mixed the stain is 35 miles away so I decided to experiment with dye.



Well, not on the bookcase, but on my hair. Do you like the results? When I finally got the stain and finished the doors, I had only three hinges for the bottom doors. The top doors were made with an additional ¼" added to make the doors 1" thick which sets into the face frame by ¼". (This was done for added strength for the leaded glass I plan to make.) I had purchased the six top hinges, but there were only three bottom hinges (without the extra ¼" offset) at our local liquidator for 29 cents each or 4 for a $1.00. They have a few stores here in Wisconsin so I asked if they would check another store to see if they could match the hinge I was missing. My husband thought I was totally nuts for even asking but, PTL, they came through for me with the 29-cent hinge!

Here's the final result, minus the leaded glass I hope to eventually make for the top doors.





The last photo is taken looking toward the kitchen island which I finished at the beginning of this year. (Maybe some day I'll write a blog and show pictures of it, too.)

It has been three years of remodeling our kitchen, dining, and den . . . and it is actually nearing completion.

Thanks for taking a look!
That turned out great
 
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