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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Note by Note

Just posted a short review of the film Note by Note. There's a lot of hope for craft, and for craftsmanship, to be found in this documentary. Let me know what you think. Here's a link to the post on my blog.
 

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Note by Note

Just posted a short review of the film Note by Note. There's a lot of hope for craft, and for craftsmanship, to be found in this documentary. Let me know what you think. Here's a link to the post on my blog.
Thank you for your excellent review and commentary. I'm definitely going to watch this movie. Your comments about the Steinway Piano factor remind me of the Amana Furniture Company in Amana, Iowa. There they make all of their furniture by hand with true craftsmen with many years of experience. Many of the positions in that shop have been handed down from father to son. They offer tours and I recommend that any woodworker who is traveling in the area should stop for a visit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Note by Note

Just posted a short review of the film Note by Note. There's a lot of hope for craft, and for craftsmanship, to be found in this documentary. Let me know what you think. Here's a link to the post on my blog.
Thanks for the suggestion, Rich. The movie is just as much about tradition as it is about music, so there's something in it for everyone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Photo of Krenov Hand Plane

In response to a large number of requests, I posted a photo of Krenov's hand plane on my blog. I appologize in advance for the poor quality of the picture; I took it with my cell phone. In the next day or so I will re-shoot with a higher-quality camera and then re-post those images.

Sincere thanks to everyone who has reviewed and commented on the blog and via email.

One more time, here is the link to the post with the photo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Book Review: The Perfect Edge, by Ron Hock

Here's the link to a short book review of blade-maker Ron Hock's new book The Perfect Edge.

If you've read this book I welcome comments and opinions either here or on my blog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hand Grinding - The Old-Fashioned Way

Grinding hand tools doesn't need to be a tool-burning, ear-splitting process. I just posted a blog entry (follow this link) that describes my shop built tool rest used with a hand-cranked wheel purchased on eBay.

Images and a link to obtain a SketchUp model of this setup are found on the blog post. Once you've had the chance to look things over, your comments and questions are welcome, either here or on the blog.

Happy grinding!!

Jeff

 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Finishing for Non-Professionals

Finishing a project can be one of the scariest phases of woodworking. Beginning with this post I will pass along some tips and tricks that will improve your finishing skills and take some of the worry out of the process. While I am NOT a professional finisher, I have worked with some of the best, and a lot of what they know we can easily apply in our own shops. If you have a question I will try to answer it in this series of posts.
 

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Finishing for Non-Professionals

Finishing a project can be one of the scariest phases of woodworking. Beginning with this post I will pass along some tips and tricks that will improve your finishing skills and take some of the worry out of the process. While I am NOT a professional finisher, I have worked with some of the best, and a lot of what they know we can easily apply in our own shops. If you have a question I will try to answer it in this series of posts.
Thanks for the post, Jeff. I am looking forward to seeing your next installment. This will be an informative series that will benefit many members of the group.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Finishing for Non-Professionals, Part II

In the second post in this series, we begin to think of finishing as a process rather than a discrete step in furniture making. Questions and comments gladly accepted and I'll work them into subsequent posts in the series.
 

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Finishing for Non-Professionals, Part II

In the second post in this series, we begin to think of finishing as a process rather than a discrete step in furniture making. Questions and comments gladly accepted and I'll work them into subsequent posts in the series.
Thank you, I appreciate these posts on finishing and look forward to reading all you are willing to post. Just starting to get into the woodworking more as I'm able to, finishing is definitely a large part of it and there seems to be a ton of information.
 

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Finishing for Non-Professionals, Part II

In the second post in this series, we begin to think of finishing as a process rather than a discrete step in furniture making. Questions and comments gladly accepted and I'll work them into subsequent posts in the series.
Hi Jeff.
Perhaps you could mention: Patience. I read a lot of blogs and forums of how the woodworker doesn't seem to have the TIME to do the proper steps. They are impatient ! I myself, am guilty of this at times (and I know better) applying the stain, doing the wipe off, applying laquer, varnish or acrylic TOO SOON. Even applying the top coats to close together, not letting them dry enough before applying more coats. I know all stains and laquers have different drying times and different methods of applying. The learning process is the experience using each one to find out for yourself those times !
Hoping that sharing my mistakes helps others to slow down, relax and do it right !
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Finishing for Non-Professionals, Part II

In the second post in this series, we begin to think of finishing as a process rather than a discrete step in furniture making. Questions and comments gladly accepted and I'll work them into subsequent posts in the series.
Canadian:

Patience is clearly a virtue in finishing, and in every other aspect of woodworking. Most of us are fortunate to not have to work at assembly-line speed. In fact, for many of us, woodworking is a way to slow down from the frenetic pace of our daily lives. We get into trouble in the shop when we rush. Sometimes it's a finish that gets messed up, but that's fixable. When rushing get us into real trouble is when it happens around power tools. Some of those incidents are not reversible, and sometimes our woodworking careers end as a result.

Once in a while I have to remind myself that it's often faster to slow down, if you get my meaning!
 
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