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Hello LJ's. A couple of months ago, my neighbor who works at a mill, surprised me with a small Doug Fir burl slab that he just managed to save from going into the chipper. It's about 20"x 15" and roughly 2" thick. Can anyone give me direction on how to best dry the slab? How long? I've just had it sitting on end in my shop since I got it. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
 

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Hey Brad
Nice neighbor. I have seen that wood, it's wonderful but full of sap. Dried and used as it is the sap will turn white in blotches and not look so nice. I have read that "setting" the sap by putting the wood in a 160 degree kiln for 24 hrs will cure it so that will not happen. I have not tried it but I have seen the results of not doing it. As far as initial drying goes, I would put it in a cool dry area with a blanket around it for few months, then take the blanket off and let it dry out the rest of the way; this, of course, if you don't put it in the kiln first. And watch for sawdust piles, we have them little bugs in fir sometimes that need to be killed off before they destroy the piece.
 

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You want to coat the whole thing if you can. That end grain cracks real easy. Get some pariphin wax melt it and coat the whole thing. If you can't get ahold of the wax put in a garbage bad, squeeze all the air out and tie the end. leave it for 6 mounths and check it with a moisture meter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks LJ's for the info!

As a matter of fact Jim, I found Greg after posting this and sent him a PM too. Thank you!
 
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