LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Hey everyone!

First post here. I'm pretty new to woodworking and am looking for some advice on how best to finish some Adirondack chairs I'm working on. I made myself a chair a few months ago everyone seemed to like it. So, naturally, I decided to make 6 more and knock out family Christmas presents in one fell swoop! I've got everything cut out, just have to sand, assemble, and finish.

The problem is, I have yet to put on a finish on my own chair and have no idea how I should finish the others that I'm giving as gifts! Although the pressure treated southern yellow pine decking that I used was cheap and convenient, I've since read that it probably wasn't the best material I could have used. Doesn't take stain well, can be pretty blotchy, doesn't really paint well if wet (which a fair amount of the material is), prone to splitting/bowing, etc… All kinds of things that just make me second guess myself instead of making a decision.

Does anyone have any experience building/finishing outdoor furniture with this? Paint vs. stain? Maybe leave them inside for the winter and finish when more dry in the spring? I'm not expecting perfection; just a decent chair that will last at least a few years and put on a smile on someone's face.

I'm excited to read what you all think about this and all my future projects. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,942 Posts
Thompsons water seal or look at the outdoor deck stains, they're for use on PT and would likely give you the best results if you want color beyond allowing the clear to weather to grey
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
427 Posts
The May/June issue of Fine Woodworking compared multiple outdoor finishes. Epifanes High Gloss Marine varnish was the clear (pun intended) winner (www.epifanes.com). The catch? It is expensive - but you get what you pay for and took 7 coats. But in the end, if you want your project to look good a year after exposure to the elements, that was the product that worked. It showed almost no color changes, flaking or deterioration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys!

I'll look into all the products mentioned. At a glance, I can't get Hemp Shield until spring in my area until spring because of freezing, but the others are still on the table.

I'm floating the idea of giving them all a single coat of Thompson's Water Sealer now and letting everyone paint their own to match their patio furniture in the spring when they put it outside.

I'll let you know how it goes. Until then, lots more sanding to do!
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top