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I am looking to increase my time woodworking in the next few years and recently wore out my 25yr old Ryobi BT3100 table saw and want to replace it with a bandsaw. Chris Schwarz over at Lost Art Press thinks highly of the Jet 414500 metal/wood bandsaw for its overall build. I am inclined to get one but noticed that the resaw capacity is 6 inches which is in stark contrast to other saws like the Laguna 14|12 which may not be as solid a build but have a resaw capacity of 12 inches.The logical question is 'well what are you going to use it for?' and I honestly don't know where my interests will take me. I am planning on making some chairs and tables in the near future. So to the audience of experienced woodworkers out there, how helpful do the majority of you find a larger resaw capacity in a bandsaw? Is 6 inches sufficient for the majority of routine tasks?
 

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6 inches is a pretty normal resaw height for me. My experience is sometimes it’s better to rip tall boards in half and resaw the separate halves. Tall boards can and will cup so I stick to shorter heights. My bandsaw can resaw 19 or 20 inches.
The real advantage is longer blades. They might cost a bit more but last much longer.
I rip more wood on my bandsaw then resaw.
Good Luck
 

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Couple of thoughts. First, it's hard to replace a table saw with a band saw, particularly for doing non-through cuts. Also, your table saw only had a cut height of ~3", so even a 6" limitation on a band saw is twice what you had before. And finally, while the saw may be capable of speeds for cutting metal and wood, in the real world most people stick to one or the other and rarely do both. The primary reason is that metal swarf and oil do not mix well with wood chips and dust. Unless you really clean the machine before switching functions, you wind up with a horrible mess and in some cases, one that could cause damage or even fire.

I'd replace the table saw with another table saw, and then think about getting the band saw as an addition to the shop, not a replacement. If you go the used route, you can probably get both for less than the cost of one new one.

Cheers,
Brad
 

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My bandsaw has a re-saw height of around 10-12 inches, but nowhere near enough power to saw through a board that wide. It could do it but would be so slow, you wouldn't want to try it. You need a couple horses to make that cut. When looking at bandsaws with more capacity, make sure they have the power to go along with it. I also agree with replacing the table saw with another table saw. you can easily do without a bandsaw, I use my table-saw on every single project, most essential tool in the shop in my opinion.
 

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I really like my Rikon 14"...really a solid all around BS and I think you'll appreciate the extra capacity down the road. For the price of that particular Jet, I bet you could get a good BS and track saw
 

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Couple of thoughts. First, it's hard to replace a table saw with a band saw, particularly for doing non-through cuts. Also, your table saw only had a cut height of ~3", so even a 6" limitation on a band saw is twice what you had before. And finally, while the saw may be capable of speeds for cutting metal and wood, in the real world most people stick to one or the other and rarely do both. The primary reason is that metal swarf and oil do not mix well with wood chips and dust. Unless you really clean the machine before switching functions, you wind up with a horrible mess and in some cases, one that could cause damage or even fire.

I'd replace the table saw with another table saw, and then think about getting the band saw as an addition to the shop, not a replacement. If you go the used route, you can probably get both for less than the cost of one new one.

Cheers,
Brad
+1
 

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Since Laguna quit selling the 14 SUV saw, which I have been very happy with, l would be looking at the Harvey. I believe they made the saw for Laguna. I think it has bearing guides instead of ceramic, and a 3 HP motor and a 14" resaw.
 

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In that price range I would take a serious look at Grizzly 17" band saws. I have had one for 12 years and it works great with a much larger capacity than the Ryobi.

I would have to agree that a band saw is not a replacement for a table saw for the type of wood working you are describing. I would replace the table saw first. Then get a band saw as a complementary tool. Band saws are handy but table saws are essential for a wood working shop.
 

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In that price range I would take a serious look at Grizzly 17" band saws. I have had one for 12 years and it works great with a much larger capacity than the Ryobi.

I would have to agree that a band saw is not a replacement for a table saw for the type of wood working you are describing. I would replace the table saw first. Then get a band saw as a complementary tool. Band saws are handy but table saws are essential for a wood working shop.
I agree. I have a 17" Canwood bought in Canada 20 years or so ago. Made in Taiwan by what seems to be the same place as Grizzly, Rikon and others at the time. Solid saw and still working flawlessly once set up properly. 14" saws are fine, but larger ~17" saws are usually that much better.
 

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The blades you use can make such a difference. I have used a small bandsaw and got good results. I have also seen some very good saws give poor results. The saw must have the basic structure to saw well and not move a lot. I have several bandsaws and all of them give good results. I have a 14", 18" and 36". All of them can give good or poor results depending on the blade and feed rate. Too slow or too fast of a feed rate is not good. After each use I clean the wheels with a stiff brush. If there are any particles stuck in the wheel I make sure they are removed.
 

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One aspect of BS vs TS that I never see mentioned is tooling(blades,and sharpening) cost and hassle.

I truly love our BS "collection".... put it this way,there's never any dust settled on our BS tables. They get used,that much. I even sharpen some of the blades(big resaw). But compared to a TS? There's no way a big'ish BS is going to be as easy to keep tooled $$$ as a big'ish(10" and up) TS. Whether you're sharpening or sending them out.

Good luck with your project. BWS
 

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I am planning on making some chairs and tables in the near future. Is 6 inches sufficient for the majority of routine tasks?
Chairs implies non-straight cuts. The bandsaw is the best choice for this.
6 to 8" is good enough. Wider board tend to cup and ripping them in two before straightening them is a current practice.
Paul Sellers is doing furniture with hand tools and only a single machine: a bandsaw.

P.S. bed picture (last blog picture - note in the text the making of the long rails)
P.S. chair picture (those chairs with bent lamination seat and back rest - easy with a band saw)
P.S. dining table picture (wide top made from lamination of narrower boards)
P.S. rocking chair picture (nearly no straight piece)
and so on...

Now if you plan to use large panels in plywood and MDF, it is another story.
 

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I am looking to increase my time woodworking in the next few years and recently wore out my 25yr old Ryobi BT3100 table saw and want to replace it with a bandsaw. Chris Schwarz over at Lost Art Press thinks highly of the Jet 414500 metal/wood bandsaw for its overall build. I am inclined to get one but noticed that the resaw capacity is 6 inches which is in stark contrast to other saws like the Laguna 14|12 which may not be as solid a build but have a resaw capacity of 12 inches.The logical question is 'well what are you going to use it for?' and I honestly don't know where my interests will take me. I am planning on making some chairs and tables in the near future. So to the audience of experienced woodworkers out there, how helpful do the majority of you find a larger resaw capacity in a bandsaw? Is 6 inches sufficient for the majority of routine tasks?
I agree with others about replacing your table saw with a bandsaw. They both cut wood but are two very different pieces of equipment. Also, unless you have a great need for a metal cutting bandsaw as well as a wood cutting bandsaw and have your heart set on that, I wouldn’t do it. Cutting metal makes a huge mess, not only with metal shavings but with the cutting oil. This combination also negates your dust collection.
You can get a SWAG mount for a handheld bandsaw. I have a Milwaukee bandsaw and this mount and it works great. This is a good $500 option if you don’t need a depth of cut greater than 5 inches, which, unless your a artsy metal fabricator, you probably don’t.
I also have a Dewalt DWE7491RS, $600 on Amazon works really well for everything but large sheets. I will probably upgrade to a 2 HP Harvey table saw (if we don’t get in a war with China) because I’m getting into cabinet building and need more stability, but it sounds like you might not use you table saw a lot.
I also have a Laguna 14/BX bandsaw. 2.5 hp, 13 inch resaw. I was going to get the 15” Harvey but the cost was too great at the time. I’m very happy with my Laguna. I purchased it through Woodcraft and can recommend them. It’s every bit as solid as the Jet and comes with a brake, the Jet doesn’t have this feature. My neighbor has a Jet and it’s a nice tool but my Laguna is every bit as nice.
Some options that maybe you haven’t thought about. I don’t know your situation so they may not apply at all. Every thing is my opinion only. Good luck! Buying new tools is fun!
 

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As far as I remember, Chris Schwarz didn't need a metal bandsaw but it was an opportunity to have a stronger build bandsaw for woodworking.

edit
here is the blog:
 

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Bandsaw height is far less important than the maximum width of cut (for me). A bigger bandsaw gives more space between the blade and the supporting structure which allows bigger pieces of wood to be used, and that’s a huge advantage. Except for experiments, I rarely need taller than a 6” cut. But I do frequently wish for a wider throat size.

My Laguna 14/12 is a great BS, but I found that a stronger motor is needed to resaw really thick slices say 8” or more. But that’s OK, since cutting tall veneers is not something in my future.
 
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