LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Cut it down

December of 2006 brought, among other things like holiday cheer and a trip to the north east, a massive rain storm followed by record high winds to Seattle. The winds brought down many trees in the area, and our neighbors had 7 fall from the greenbelt in their back yard into their house and property. Our trees and yard survived without issue.

During the cleanup of their yard, a rather sketchy "tree service" indicated a couple cedars were threatening our house. I didn't trust the guy, but I did trust the arborist that came out a week later and said the cedars were fine but that an old 80 foot alder was a real danger.

They came out a few months ago and cut down the majority of the tree. I had them cut the main trunk into 8-foot segments, with the idea that I'd be able to rent a mobile band saw mill and get some good furniture lumber from it.

I couldn't find a mobile band saw mill, but I did find LumberJock Dorje! He is willing to help me get this stuff cut, with his chain saw and milling attachment. I will document the process with text and images (once I take some) here.

You guys have no idea how stoked I am that this site exists, and brings a community of woodworkers together.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Cut it down

December of 2006 brought, among other things like holiday cheer and a trip to the north east, a massive rain storm followed by record high winds to Seattle. The winds brought down many trees in the area, and our neighbors had 7 fall from the greenbelt in their back yard into their house and property. Our trees and yard survived without issue.

During the cleanup of their yard, a rather sketchy "tree service" indicated a couple cedars were threatening our house. I didn't trust the guy, but I did trust the arborist that came out a week later and said the cedars were fine but that an old 80 foot alder was a real danger.

They came out a few months ago and cut down the majority of the tree. I had them cut the main trunk into 8-foot segments, with the idea that I'd be able to rent a mobile band saw mill and get some good furniture lumber from it.

I couldn't find a mobile band saw mill, but I did find LumberJock Dorje! He is willing to help me get this stuff cut, with his chain saw and milling attachment. I will document the process with text and images (once I take some) here.

You guys have no idea how stoked I am that this site exists, and brings a community of woodworkers together.
I get my logs cut down at NW Woods in Puyallup. They have mill service and kiln service too, but you have to bring it to them. I Dropped a truck load of Port Orford Cedar and picked it up 3 days later.

There is a guy on Craigslist that travels all over washington with his mill. He was in Hood Canal and the Kitsap area recently. I think he also offers tree falling services too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,770 Posts
Cut it down

December of 2006 brought, among other things like holiday cheer and a trip to the north east, a massive rain storm followed by record high winds to Seattle. The winds brought down many trees in the area, and our neighbors had 7 fall from the greenbelt in their back yard into their house and property. Our trees and yard survived without issue.

During the cleanup of their yard, a rather sketchy "tree service" indicated a couple cedars were threatening our house. I didn't trust the guy, but I did trust the arborist that came out a week later and said the cedars were fine but that an old 80 foot alder was a real danger.

They came out a few months ago and cut down the majority of the tree. I had them cut the main trunk into 8-foot segments, with the idea that I'd be able to rent a mobile band saw mill and get some good furniture lumber from it.

I couldn't find a mobile band saw mill, but I did find LumberJock Dorje! He is willing to help me get this stuff cut, with his chain saw and milling attachment. I will document the process with text and images (once I take some) here.

You guys have no idea how stoked I am that this site exists, and brings a community of woodworkers together.
Hippie - Looking forward to it! The wind and the rain bring (down) blessings in disguise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,304 Posts
Cut it down

December of 2006 brought, among other things like holiday cheer and a trip to the north east, a massive rain storm followed by record high winds to Seattle. The winds brought down many trees in the area, and our neighbors had 7 fall from the greenbelt in their back yard into their house and property. Our trees and yard survived without issue.

During the cleanup of their yard, a rather sketchy "tree service" indicated a couple cedars were threatening our house. I didn't trust the guy, but I did trust the arborist that came out a week later and said the cedars were fine but that an old 80 foot alder was a real danger.

They came out a few months ago and cut down the majority of the tree. I had them cut the main trunk into 8-foot segments, with the idea that I'd be able to rent a mobile band saw mill and get some good furniture lumber from it.

I couldn't find a mobile band saw mill, but I did find LumberJock Dorje! He is willing to help me get this stuff cut, with his chain saw and milling attachment. I will document the process with text and images (once I take some) here.

You guys have no idea how stoked I am that this site exists, and brings a community of woodworkers together.
Can't wait to see the milling, then a project or two from this lumber.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,220 Posts
Cut it down

December of 2006 brought, among other things like holiday cheer and a trip to the north east, a massive rain storm followed by record high winds to Seattle. The winds brought down many trees in the area, and our neighbors had 7 fall from the greenbelt in their back yard into their house and property. Our trees and yard survived without issue.

During the cleanup of their yard, a rather sketchy "tree service" indicated a couple cedars were threatening our house. I didn't trust the guy, but I did trust the arborist that came out a week later and said the cedars were fine but that an old 80 foot alder was a real danger.

They came out a few months ago and cut down the majority of the tree. I had them cut the main trunk into 8-foot segments, with the idea that I'd be able to rent a mobile band saw mill and get some good furniture lumber from it.

I couldn't find a mobile band saw mill, but I did find LumberJock Dorje! He is willing to help me get this stuff cut, with his chain saw and milling attachment. I will document the process with text and images (once I take some) here.

You guys have no idea how stoked I am that this site exists, and brings a community of woodworkers together.
Ooooooo fresh cut lumber. The only problem being you now have to wait for it to dry and it will sit there and taunt you. Happy cutting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,252 Posts
Cut it down

December of 2006 brought, among other things like holiday cheer and a trip to the north east, a massive rain storm followed by record high winds to Seattle. The winds brought down many trees in the area, and our neighbors had 7 fall from the greenbelt in their back yard into their house and property. Our trees and yard survived without issue.

During the cleanup of their yard, a rather sketchy "tree service" indicated a couple cedars were threatening our house. I didn't trust the guy, but I did trust the arborist that came out a week later and said the cedars were fine but that an old 80 foot alder was a real danger.

They came out a few months ago and cut down the majority of the tree. I had them cut the main trunk into 8-foot segments, with the idea that I'd be able to rent a mobile band saw mill and get some good furniture lumber from it.

I couldn't find a mobile band saw mill, but I did find LumberJock Dorje! He is willing to help me get this stuff cut, with his chain saw and milling attachment. I will document the process with text and images (once I take some) here.

You guys have no idea how stoked I am that this site exists, and brings a community of woodworkers together.
That is a wonderful re-use of materials. You could have easily cut up the tree for firewood and let it go at that. But generating your own lumber is a rewarding experience. Two years ago I tried the same route. I had two large ashes and a large cherry that had to be cut. I tried without success to find a sawyier to convert them to lumber but there wasn't anyone willing to do this. I can say without a doubt seeing the cherry go for firewood really hurt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,890 Posts
Cut it down

December of 2006 brought, among other things like holiday cheer and a trip to the north east, a massive rain storm followed by record high winds to Seattle. The winds brought down many trees in the area, and our neighbors had 7 fall from the greenbelt in their back yard into their house and property. Our trees and yard survived without issue.

During the cleanup of their yard, a rather sketchy "tree service" indicated a couple cedars were threatening our house. I didn't trust the guy, but I did trust the arborist that came out a week later and said the cedars were fine but that an old 80 foot alder was a real danger.

They came out a few months ago and cut down the majority of the tree. I had them cut the main trunk into 8-foot segments, with the idea that I'd be able to rent a mobile band saw mill and get some good furniture lumber from it.

I couldn't find a mobile band saw mill, but I did find LumberJock Dorje! He is willing to help me get this stuff cut, with his chain saw and milling attachment. I will document the process with text and images (once I take some) here.

You guys have no idea how stoked I am that this site exists, and brings a community of woodworkers together.
way to go LumberJocks!! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,383 Posts
Cut it down

December of 2006 brought, among other things like holiday cheer and a trip to the north east, a massive rain storm followed by record high winds to Seattle. The winds brought down many trees in the area, and our neighbors had 7 fall from the greenbelt in their back yard into their house and property. Our trees and yard survived without issue.

During the cleanup of their yard, a rather sketchy "tree service" indicated a couple cedars were threatening our house. I didn't trust the guy, but I did trust the arborist that came out a week later and said the cedars were fine but that an old 80 foot alder was a real danger.

They came out a few months ago and cut down the majority of the tree. I had them cut the main trunk into 8-foot segments, with the idea that I'd be able to rent a mobile band saw mill and get some good furniture lumber from it.

I couldn't find a mobile band saw mill, but I did find LumberJock Dorje! He is willing to help me get this stuff cut, with his chain saw and milling attachment. I will document the process with text and images (once I take some) here.

You guys have no idea how stoked I am that this site exists, and brings a community of woodworkers together.
Gtreat that you are/were able to make contact. It's a good thing to get some great wood for a reasonable price., and sweat equity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
Cut it down

December of 2006 brought, among other things like holiday cheer and a trip to the north east, a massive rain storm followed by record high winds to Seattle. The winds brought down many trees in the area, and our neighbors had 7 fall from the greenbelt in their back yard into their house and property. Our trees and yard survived without issue.

During the cleanup of their yard, a rather sketchy "tree service" indicated a couple cedars were threatening our house. I didn't trust the guy, but I did trust the arborist that came out a week later and said the cedars were fine but that an old 80 foot alder was a real danger.

They came out a few months ago and cut down the majority of the tree. I had them cut the main trunk into 8-foot segments, with the idea that I'd be able to rent a mobile band saw mill and get some good furniture lumber from it.

I couldn't find a mobile band saw mill, but I did find LumberJock Dorje! He is willing to help me get this stuff cut, with his chain saw and milling attachment. I will document the process with text and images (once I take some) here.

You guys have no idea how stoked I am that this site exists, and brings a community of woodworkers together.
I'd be suspect about this 'supposed' tree until we all see some pictures ;)

Have any project in mind for the planks once they're cut and dry?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Cut it down

December of 2006 brought, among other things like holiday cheer and a trip to the north east, a massive rain storm followed by record high winds to Seattle. The winds brought down many trees in the area, and our neighbors had 7 fall from the greenbelt in their back yard into their house and property. Our trees and yard survived without issue.

During the cleanup of their yard, a rather sketchy "tree service" indicated a couple cedars were threatening our house. I didn't trust the guy, but I did trust the arborist that came out a week later and said the cedars were fine but that an old 80 foot alder was a real danger.

They came out a few months ago and cut down the majority of the tree. I had them cut the main trunk into 8-foot segments, with the idea that I'd be able to rent a mobile band saw mill and get some good furniture lumber from it.

I couldn't find a mobile band saw mill, but I did find LumberJock Dorje! He is willing to help me get this stuff cut, with his chain saw and milling attachment. I will document the process with text and images (once I take some) here.

You guys have no idea how stoked I am that this site exists, and brings a community of woodworkers together.
I don't have anything specific in mind. I want to see how much wood, what it looks like, etc, before I start thinking about projects for it. But I do have a lot of furniture ideas in general for my house, so it will probably be used there. And, I have a friend who makes electric guitars and is interested in some of the wood…
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Divide and conquer

Saturday was the day. Mr. Dorje came over with the tools and know-how, I provided assistance when able. We spent about seven hours, milling five logs each between six an eight feet long, and about 26" in diameter.

The two widest logs we milled into 10/4 slabs, the rest we milled closer to 5/4 planks. The 10/4 is ear-marked for a friend of mine who will use it to make electric guitar bodies. The rest? I'll figure that out when it is dry and as the need arises.

It was a great day-I had a good chance to get to know Ananda, I learned a bit about chainsaw milling, and my wife and I really enjoyed hitting the pub with the Dorje's after.

Sunday I spent a few hours moving and stacking the lumber. Great workout, but now I'm pooped! So, in about a year I'll be looking to get a bandsaw, so I can take full advantage of the alder!

Sorry I don't have any pictures of the process-I seem to have misplaced my camera.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,252 Posts
Divide and conquer

Saturday was the day. Mr. Dorje came over with the tools and know-how, I provided assistance when able. We spent about seven hours, milling five logs each between six an eight feet long, and about 26" in diameter.

The two widest logs we milled into 10/4 slabs, the rest we milled closer to 5/4 planks. The 10/4 is ear-marked for a friend of mine who will use it to make electric guitar bodies. The rest? I'll figure that out when it is dry and as the need arises.

It was a great day-I had a good chance to get to know Ananda, I learned a bit about chainsaw milling, and my wife and I really enjoyed hitting the pub with the Dorje's after.

Sunday I spent a few hours moving and stacking the lumber. Great workout, but now I'm pooped! So, in about a year I'll be looking to get a bandsaw, so I can take full advantage of the alder!

Sorry I don't have any pictures of the process-I seem to have misplaced my camera.
This is a nice post. I have always wanted to have the ability to mill my own lumber simply because by doing so you can participate in the entire furniture cycle (with the exception of tree creation of course). Don't worry about finding a use for the lumber, if you have the lumber the plans will come.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,770 Posts
Divide and conquer

Saturday was the day. Mr. Dorje came over with the tools and know-how, I provided assistance when able. We spent about seven hours, milling five logs each between six an eight feet long, and about 26" in diameter.

The two widest logs we milled into 10/4 slabs, the rest we milled closer to 5/4 planks. The 10/4 is ear-marked for a friend of mine who will use it to make electric guitar bodies. The rest? I'll figure that out when it is dry and as the need arises.

It was a great day-I had a good chance to get to know Ananda, I learned a bit about chainsaw milling, and my wife and I really enjoyed hitting the pub with the Dorje's after.

Sunday I spent a few hours moving and stacking the lumber. Great workout, but now I'm pooped! So, in about a year I'll be looking to get a bandsaw, so I can take full advantage of the alder!

Sorry I don't have any pictures of the process-I seem to have misplaced my camera.
That was a great day! Start to finish! damnHippie said, "I provided assistance when able." Yeah right! He did half the work…it's not the easiest work in the world either!

Do I have to come over to take pictures so that people will believe you? I mean, can I come over and take some pictures?

Hey - you want to knock over another one of your trees? Say, in a year or two?
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top