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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First day's construction

I decided I don't like the metal-frame coping saws. I find that the far end of the saw will often twist when I don't want it to, and I'll end up cutting a curve when I don't want to, or cutting a straight line when I want a curve. So I decided I'd make a bow saw that uses the standard coping saw blades to complement my bigger turning saws ( 1 and 2).

First I cut the arms out of a piece of citrus I got from AZWoody a couple years back. Then I drilled holes in the arms for the pins (from Gramercy Tools) and inserted the pins with one of the coping saw blades I want to be able to use in this saw. This let me figure out the length of the cross-piece. The important thing is to remember to leave material for the tenons that will stick into the mortises in the arms (DAMHIKT).

Ruler Office ruler Wood Rectangle Natural material


With that done, it's time to chop the mortises in the arms.

Wood Hardwood Office ruler Tool Wood stain


Just chisel work with a ¼" chisel. Aim for about ⅜" deep, because I'm working with ¾" stock.

Then it was time for a little break, so I fired up the lathe to make the handles. The citrus turns pretty well, I think.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain


Time for some tenons. Cut them to match the mortise, then pare with a chisel to make them fit. They can be a little loose - the shoulders carry all the load.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Ruler Plank


Wood Rectangle Brick Building material Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Grey Flooring Brick


Do a test fit and mark the pieces for orientation.

Wood Composite material Hardwood Plank Rectangle


Then it's time to start shaping the arms. I do one dimension at a time, roughing with a coping saw, then a spokeshave, then a knife, and eventually maybe a rasp (if I can't get a nice finish with the knife).

Wood Tool Hardwood Wood stain Metal


Wood Composite material Hardwood Wood stain Metalworking hand tool


Tableware Wood Tool Finger Kitchen utensil


Wood Hand tool Tool Stonemason's hammer Metalworking hand tool


Then it was time to take a break and get some food. Next up will be shaping the other arm (they don't have to match exactly, but they need to look good together) and the cross piece, then doing the same in the other dimension for all the pieces. Also need to epoxy the pins into the handles, find some string, and carve a toggle to tension the string.
 

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First day's construction

I decided I don't like the metal-frame coping saws. I find that the far end of the saw will often twist when I don't want it to, and I'll end up cutting a curve when I don't want to, or cutting a straight line when I want a curve. So I decided I'd make a bow saw that uses the standard coping saw blades to complement my bigger turning saws ( 1 and 2).

First I cut the arms out of a piece of citrus I got from AZWoody a couple years back. Then I drilled holes in the arms for the pins (from Gramercy Tools) and inserted the pins with one of the coping saw blades I want to be able to use in this saw. This let me figure out the length of the cross-piece. The important thing is to remember to leave material for the tenons that will stick into the mortises in the arms (DAMHIKT).

Ruler Office ruler Wood Rectangle Natural material


With that done, it's time to chop the mortises in the arms.

Wood Hardwood Office ruler Tool Wood stain


Just chisel work with a ¼" chisel. Aim for about ⅜" deep, because I'm working with ¾" stock.

Then it was time for a little break, so I fired up the lathe to make the handles. The citrus turns pretty well, I think.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain


Time for some tenons. Cut them to match the mortise, then pare with a chisel to make them fit. They can be a little loose - the shoulders carry all the load.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Ruler Plank


Wood Rectangle Brick Building material Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Grey Flooring Brick


Do a test fit and mark the pieces for orientation.

Wood Composite material Hardwood Plank Rectangle


Then it's time to start shaping the arms. I do one dimension at a time, roughing with a coping saw, then a spokeshave, then a knife, and eventually maybe a rasp (if I can't get a nice finish with the knife).

Wood Tool Hardwood Wood stain Metal


Wood Composite material Hardwood Wood stain Metalworking hand tool


Tableware Wood Tool Finger Kitchen utensil


Wood Hand tool Tool Stonemason's hammer Metalworking hand tool


Then it was time to take a break and get some food. Next up will be shaping the other arm (they don't have to match exactly, but they need to look good together) and the cross piece, then doing the same in the other dimension for all the pieces. Also need to epoxy the pins into the handles, find some string, and carve a toggle to tension the string.
aww cute baby :<)))
 

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First day's construction

I decided I don't like the metal-frame coping saws. I find that the far end of the saw will often twist when I don't want it to, and I'll end up cutting a curve when I don't want to, or cutting a straight line when I want a curve. So I decided I'd make a bow saw that uses the standard coping saw blades to complement my bigger turning saws ( 1 and 2).

First I cut the arms out of a piece of citrus I got from AZWoody a couple years back. Then I drilled holes in the arms for the pins (from Gramercy Tools) and inserted the pins with one of the coping saw blades I want to be able to use in this saw. This let me figure out the length of the cross-piece. The important thing is to remember to leave material for the tenons that will stick into the mortises in the arms (DAMHIKT).

Ruler Office ruler Wood Rectangle Natural material


With that done, it's time to chop the mortises in the arms.

Wood Hardwood Office ruler Tool Wood stain


Just chisel work with a ¼" chisel. Aim for about ⅜" deep, because I'm working with ¾" stock.

Then it was time for a little break, so I fired up the lathe to make the handles. The citrus turns pretty well, I think.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain


Time for some tenons. Cut them to match the mortise, then pare with a chisel to make them fit. They can be a little loose - the shoulders carry all the load.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Ruler Plank


Wood Rectangle Brick Building material Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Grey Flooring Brick


Do a test fit and mark the pieces for orientation.

Wood Composite material Hardwood Plank Rectangle


Then it's time to start shaping the arms. I do one dimension at a time, roughing with a coping saw, then a spokeshave, then a knife, and eventually maybe a rasp (if I can't get a nice finish with the knife).

Wood Tool Hardwood Wood stain Metal


Wood Composite material Hardwood Wood stain Metalworking hand tool


Tableware Wood Tool Finger Kitchen utensil


Wood Hand tool Tool Stonemason's hammer Metalworking hand tool


Then it was time to take a break and get some food. Next up will be shaping the other arm (they don't have to match exactly, but they need to look good together) and the cross piece, then doing the same in the other dimension for all the pieces. Also need to epoxy the pins into the handles, find some string, and carve a toggle to tension the string.
Now this is getting fancy Dave, remaking your tools to suit yourself, nice one sir
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
First day's construction

I decided I don't like the metal-frame coping saws. I find that the far end of the saw will often twist when I don't want it to, and I'll end up cutting a curve when I don't want to, or cutting a straight line when I want a curve. So I decided I'd make a bow saw that uses the standard coping saw blades to complement my bigger turning saws ( 1 and 2).

First I cut the arms out of a piece of citrus I got from AZWoody a couple years back. Then I drilled holes in the arms for the pins (from Gramercy Tools) and inserted the pins with one of the coping saw blades I want to be able to use in this saw. This let me figure out the length of the cross-piece. The important thing is to remember to leave material for the tenons that will stick into the mortises in the arms (DAMHIKT).

Ruler Office ruler Wood Rectangle Natural material


With that done, it's time to chop the mortises in the arms.

Wood Hardwood Office ruler Tool Wood stain


Just chisel work with a ¼" chisel. Aim for about ⅜" deep, because I'm working with ¾" stock.

Then it was time for a little break, so I fired up the lathe to make the handles. The citrus turns pretty well, I think.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain


Time for some tenons. Cut them to match the mortise, then pare with a chisel to make them fit. They can be a little loose - the shoulders carry all the load.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Ruler Plank


Wood Rectangle Brick Building material Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Grey Flooring Brick


Do a test fit and mark the pieces for orientation.

Wood Composite material Hardwood Plank Rectangle


Then it's time to start shaping the arms. I do one dimension at a time, roughing with a coping saw, then a spokeshave, then a knife, and eventually maybe a rasp (if I can't get a nice finish with the knife).

Wood Tool Hardwood Wood stain Metal


Wood Composite material Hardwood Wood stain Metalworking hand tool


Tableware Wood Tool Finger Kitchen utensil


Wood Hand tool Tool Stonemason's hammer Metalworking hand tool


Then it was time to take a break and get some food. Next up will be shaping the other arm (they don't have to match exactly, but they need to look good together) and the cross piece, then doing the same in the other dimension for all the pieces. Also need to epoxy the pins into the handles, find some string, and carve a toggle to tension the string.
Thanks, Tony! Isn't it a cute little guy? Be even better when it's done.

Peter, bow saws and turning saws are so easy to make that I kinda figure there's no reason not to make one, especially since I ended up cursing the coping saw again when its frame flexed enough to lose one end of the blade while I was shaping the arms today.

I'm pretty sure I'll have a functional saw in two days. Whether I decide to decorate it or not… we'll see how I'm feeling, but this citrus looks like it would really look spiffy with some kohlrosing on it. Maybe I'll sketch some designs this evening, and have my sweetie save me her coffee grounds tomorrow morning.
 

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First day's construction

I decided I don't like the metal-frame coping saws. I find that the far end of the saw will often twist when I don't want it to, and I'll end up cutting a curve when I don't want to, or cutting a straight line when I want a curve. So I decided I'd make a bow saw that uses the standard coping saw blades to complement my bigger turning saws ( 1 and 2).

First I cut the arms out of a piece of citrus I got from AZWoody a couple years back. Then I drilled holes in the arms for the pins (from Gramercy Tools) and inserted the pins with one of the coping saw blades I want to be able to use in this saw. This let me figure out the length of the cross-piece. The important thing is to remember to leave material for the tenons that will stick into the mortises in the arms (DAMHIKT).

Ruler Office ruler Wood Rectangle Natural material


With that done, it's time to chop the mortises in the arms.

Wood Hardwood Office ruler Tool Wood stain


Just chisel work with a ¼" chisel. Aim for about ⅜" deep, because I'm working with ¾" stock.

Then it was time for a little break, so I fired up the lathe to make the handles. The citrus turns pretty well, I think.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain


Time for some tenons. Cut them to match the mortise, then pare with a chisel to make them fit. They can be a little loose - the shoulders carry all the load.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Ruler Plank


Wood Rectangle Brick Building material Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Grey Flooring Brick


Do a test fit and mark the pieces for orientation.

Wood Composite material Hardwood Plank Rectangle


Then it's time to start shaping the arms. I do one dimension at a time, roughing with a coping saw, then a spokeshave, then a knife, and eventually maybe a rasp (if I can't get a nice finish with the knife).

Wood Tool Hardwood Wood stain Metal


Wood Composite material Hardwood Wood stain Metalworking hand tool


Tableware Wood Tool Finger Kitchen utensil


Wood Hand tool Tool Stonemason's hammer Metalworking hand tool


Then it was time to take a break and get some food. Next up will be shaping the other arm (they don't have to match exactly, but they need to look good together) and the cross piece, then doing the same in the other dimension for all the pieces. Also need to epoxy the pins into the handles, find some string, and carve a toggle to tension the string.
Looking good, home made tools are a satisfying task.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
First day's construction

I decided I don't like the metal-frame coping saws. I find that the far end of the saw will often twist when I don't want it to, and I'll end up cutting a curve when I don't want to, or cutting a straight line when I want a curve. So I decided I'd make a bow saw that uses the standard coping saw blades to complement my bigger turning saws ( 1 and 2).

First I cut the arms out of a piece of citrus I got from AZWoody a couple years back. Then I drilled holes in the arms for the pins (from Gramercy Tools) and inserted the pins with one of the coping saw blades I want to be able to use in this saw. This let me figure out the length of the cross-piece. The important thing is to remember to leave material for the tenons that will stick into the mortises in the arms (DAMHIKT).

Ruler Office ruler Wood Rectangle Natural material


With that done, it's time to chop the mortises in the arms.

Wood Hardwood Office ruler Tool Wood stain


Just chisel work with a ¼" chisel. Aim for about ⅜" deep, because I'm working with ¾" stock.

Then it was time for a little break, so I fired up the lathe to make the handles. The citrus turns pretty well, I think.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain


Time for some tenons. Cut them to match the mortise, then pare with a chisel to make them fit. They can be a little loose - the shoulders carry all the load.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Ruler Plank


Wood Rectangle Brick Building material Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Grey Flooring Brick


Do a test fit and mark the pieces for orientation.

Wood Composite material Hardwood Plank Rectangle


Then it's time to start shaping the arms. I do one dimension at a time, roughing with a coping saw, then a spokeshave, then a knife, and eventually maybe a rasp (if I can't get a nice finish with the knife).

Wood Tool Hardwood Wood stain Metal


Wood Composite material Hardwood Wood stain Metalworking hand tool


Tableware Wood Tool Finger Kitchen utensil


Wood Hand tool Tool Stonemason's hammer Metalworking hand tool


Then it was time to take a break and get some food. Next up will be shaping the other arm (they don't have to match exactly, but they need to look good together) and the cross piece, then doing the same in the other dimension for all the pieces. Also need to epoxy the pins into the handles, find some string, and carve a toggle to tension the string.
Thanks, Tom! Yeah they are, and then using them in the future, there's a little, "Hey, I made that," every time I pick one up.
 

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First day's construction

I decided I don't like the metal-frame coping saws. I find that the far end of the saw will often twist when I don't want it to, and I'll end up cutting a curve when I don't want to, or cutting a straight line when I want a curve. So I decided I'd make a bow saw that uses the standard coping saw blades to complement my bigger turning saws ( 1 and 2).

First I cut the arms out of a piece of citrus I got from AZWoody a couple years back. Then I drilled holes in the arms for the pins (from Gramercy Tools) and inserted the pins with one of the coping saw blades I want to be able to use in this saw. This let me figure out the length of the cross-piece. The important thing is to remember to leave material for the tenons that will stick into the mortises in the arms (DAMHIKT).

Ruler Office ruler Wood Rectangle Natural material


With that done, it's time to chop the mortises in the arms.

Wood Hardwood Office ruler Tool Wood stain


Just chisel work with a ¼" chisel. Aim for about ⅜" deep, because I'm working with ¾" stock.

Then it was time for a little break, so I fired up the lathe to make the handles. The citrus turns pretty well, I think.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain


Time for some tenons. Cut them to match the mortise, then pare with a chisel to make them fit. They can be a little loose - the shoulders carry all the load.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Ruler Plank


Wood Rectangle Brick Building material Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Grey Flooring Brick


Do a test fit and mark the pieces for orientation.

Wood Composite material Hardwood Plank Rectangle


Then it's time to start shaping the arms. I do one dimension at a time, roughing with a coping saw, then a spokeshave, then a knife, and eventually maybe a rasp (if I can't get a nice finish with the knife).

Wood Tool Hardwood Wood stain Metal


Wood Composite material Hardwood Wood stain Metalworking hand tool


Tableware Wood Tool Finger Kitchen utensil


Wood Hand tool Tool Stonemason's hammer Metalworking hand tool


Then it was time to take a break and get some food. Next up will be shaping the other arm (they don't have to match exactly, but they need to look good together) and the cross piece, then doing the same in the other dimension for all the pieces. Also need to epoxy the pins into the handles, find some string, and carve a toggle to tension the string.
Have the saw's big brother…
Wood Gas Working animal Automotive wheel system Auto part


9 ppi crosscut…

Your's is starting out nicely…
 

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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
First day's construction

I decided I don't like the metal-frame coping saws. I find that the far end of the saw will often twist when I don't want it to, and I'll end up cutting a curve when I don't want to, or cutting a straight line when I want a curve. So I decided I'd make a bow saw that uses the standard coping saw blades to complement my bigger turning saws ( 1 and 2).

First I cut the arms out of a piece of citrus I got from AZWoody a couple years back. Then I drilled holes in the arms for the pins (from Gramercy Tools) and inserted the pins with one of the coping saw blades I want to be able to use in this saw. This let me figure out the length of the cross-piece. The important thing is to remember to leave material for the tenons that will stick into the mortises in the arms (DAMHIKT).

Ruler Office ruler Wood Rectangle Natural material


With that done, it's time to chop the mortises in the arms.

Wood Hardwood Office ruler Tool Wood stain


Just chisel work with a ¼" chisel. Aim for about ⅜" deep, because I'm working with ¾" stock.

Then it was time for a little break, so I fired up the lathe to make the handles. The citrus turns pretty well, I think.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain


Time for some tenons. Cut them to match the mortise, then pare with a chisel to make them fit. They can be a little loose - the shoulders carry all the load.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Ruler Plank


Wood Rectangle Brick Building material Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Grey Flooring Brick


Do a test fit and mark the pieces for orientation.

Wood Composite material Hardwood Plank Rectangle


Then it's time to start shaping the arms. I do one dimension at a time, roughing with a coping saw, then a spokeshave, then a knife, and eventually maybe a rasp (if I can't get a nice finish with the knife).

Wood Tool Hardwood Wood stain Metal


Wood Composite material Hardwood Wood stain Metalworking hand tool


Tableware Wood Tool Finger Kitchen utensil


Wood Hand tool Tool Stonemason's hammer Metalworking hand tool


Then it was time to take a break and get some food. Next up will be shaping the other arm (they don't have to match exactly, but they need to look good together) and the cross piece, then doing the same in the other dimension for all the pieces. Also need to epoxy the pins into the handles, find some string, and carve a toggle to tension the string.
Bet mine will cut a tighter corner, Bandit. ;-)

Thanks!
 

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First day's construction

I decided I don't like the metal-frame coping saws. I find that the far end of the saw will often twist when I don't want it to, and I'll end up cutting a curve when I don't want to, or cutting a straight line when I want a curve. So I decided I'd make a bow saw that uses the standard coping saw blades to complement my bigger turning saws ( 1 and 2).

First I cut the arms out of a piece of citrus I got from AZWoody a couple years back. Then I drilled holes in the arms for the pins (from Gramercy Tools) and inserted the pins with one of the coping saw blades I want to be able to use in this saw. This let me figure out the length of the cross-piece. The important thing is to remember to leave material for the tenons that will stick into the mortises in the arms (DAMHIKT).

Ruler Office ruler Wood Rectangle Natural material


With that done, it's time to chop the mortises in the arms.

Wood Hardwood Office ruler Tool Wood stain


Just chisel work with a ¼" chisel. Aim for about ⅜" deep, because I'm working with ¾" stock.

Then it was time for a little break, so I fired up the lathe to make the handles. The citrus turns pretty well, I think.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain


Time for some tenons. Cut them to match the mortise, then pare with a chisel to make them fit. They can be a little loose - the shoulders carry all the load.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Ruler Plank


Wood Rectangle Brick Building material Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Grey Flooring Brick


Do a test fit and mark the pieces for orientation.

Wood Composite material Hardwood Plank Rectangle


Then it's time to start shaping the arms. I do one dimension at a time, roughing with a coping saw, then a spokeshave, then a knife, and eventually maybe a rasp (if I can't get a nice finish with the knife).

Wood Tool Hardwood Wood stain Metal


Wood Composite material Hardwood Wood stain Metalworking hand tool


Tableware Wood Tool Finger Kitchen utensil


Wood Hand tool Tool Stonemason's hammer Metalworking hand tool


Then it was time to take a break and get some food. Next up will be shaping the other arm (they don't have to match exactly, but they need to look good together) and the cross piece, then doing the same in the other dimension for all the pieces. Also need to epoxy the pins into the handles, find some string, and carve a toggle to tension the string.
This is a cool little project Dave. Coming along fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
More shaping

This afternoon was spent shaping the cross-piece and the arms. First up, taking a spokeshave to the cross piece to thin it slightly in the middle, and make the ends match the arms nicely. It's not going to be a huge taper, but just a little bit looks a lot better than none. Plus I get to smooth out the surface now. I don't think I'll be doing any sanding on this saw, so I want to fix any little spots of tear-out from cutting and planing the pieces.

Wood Tool Wood stain Hardwood Engineering


Wood Rectangle Flooring Metal Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Font Hardwood


Then I used the spokeshave and a knife to chamfer the corners, giving the piece a slight octagonal shape. Again, lots of grain-reading, as there are some funky reversals in this wood.

Next up we're the arms. It's time to round over the ends where the pins for the saw will go. I basically mark an equal amount on the top and side, then use a rasp to round over, removing my pencil marks. If it doesn't look right, I'll add more marks and remove a little more.

Wood Trunk Hardwood Building material Wood stain


Wood Artifact Art Sculpture Hardwood


Wood Composite material Natural material Hardwood Rectangle


Then I took a knife and chamfered the corners on the part of the arms which will hold the string. I didn't want to do too much, as I also need to shape the lower parts of the arms, but that's a job for tomorrow.

Wood Natural material Hardwood Human leg Fashion accessory


And that's it for today. I've got a day and a half in, and other than sharp corners on the lower parts of the arms, the saw is usable and not looking half-bad,
 

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More shaping

This afternoon was spent shaping the cross-piece and the arms. First up, taking a spokeshave to the cross piece to thin it slightly in the middle, and make the ends match the arms nicely. It's not going to be a huge taper, but just a little bit looks a lot better than none. Plus I get to smooth out the surface now. I don't think I'll be doing any sanding on this saw, so I want to fix any little spots of tear-out from cutting and planing the pieces.

Wood Tool Wood stain Hardwood Engineering


Wood Rectangle Flooring Metal Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Font Hardwood


Then I used the spokeshave and a knife to chamfer the corners, giving the piece a slight octagonal shape. Again, lots of grain-reading, as there are some funky reversals in this wood.

Next up we're the arms. It's time to round over the ends where the pins for the saw will go. I basically mark an equal amount on the top and side, then use a rasp to round over, removing my pencil marks. If it doesn't look right, I'll add more marks and remove a little more.

Wood Trunk Hardwood Building material Wood stain


Wood Artifact Art Sculpture Hardwood


Wood Composite material Natural material Hardwood Rectangle


Then I took a knife and chamfered the corners on the part of the arms which will hold the string. I didn't want to do too much, as I also need to shape the lower parts of the arms, but that's a job for tomorrow.

Wood Natural material Hardwood Human leg Fashion accessory


And that's it for today. I've got a day and a half in, and other than sharp corners on the lower parts of the arms, the saw is usable and not looking half-bad,
Coming along nicely, I'll be looking for tomorrow's follow up.
 

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Premium Member
Joined
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33,525 Posts
More shaping

This afternoon was spent shaping the cross-piece and the arms. First up, taking a spokeshave to the cross piece to thin it slightly in the middle, and make the ends match the arms nicely. It's not going to be a huge taper, but just a little bit looks a lot better than none. Plus I get to smooth out the surface now. I don't think I'll be doing any sanding on this saw, so I want to fix any little spots of tear-out from cutting and planing the pieces.

Wood Tool Wood stain Hardwood Engineering


Wood Rectangle Flooring Metal Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Font Hardwood


Then I used the spokeshave and a knife to chamfer the corners, giving the piece a slight octagonal shape. Again, lots of grain-reading, as there are some funky reversals in this wood.

Next up we're the arms. It's time to round over the ends where the pins for the saw will go. I basically mark an equal amount on the top and side, then use a rasp to round over, removing my pencil marks. If it doesn't look right, I'll add more marks and remove a little more.

Wood Trunk Hardwood Building material Wood stain


Wood Artifact Art Sculpture Hardwood


Wood Composite material Natural material Hardwood Rectangle


Then I took a knife and chamfered the corners on the part of the arms which will hold the string. I didn't want to do too much, as I also need to shape the lower parts of the arms, but that's a job for tomorrow.

Wood Natural material Hardwood Human leg Fashion accessory


And that's it for today. I've got a day and a half in, and other than sharp corners on the lower parts of the arms, the saw is usable and not looking half-bad,
Looks good from here…
 

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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
More shaping

This afternoon was spent shaping the cross-piece and the arms. First up, taking a spokeshave to the cross piece to thin it slightly in the middle, and make the ends match the arms nicely. It's not going to be a huge taper, but just a little bit looks a lot better than none. Plus I get to smooth out the surface now. I don't think I'll be doing any sanding on this saw, so I want to fix any little spots of tear-out from cutting and planing the pieces.

Wood Tool Wood stain Hardwood Engineering


Wood Rectangle Flooring Metal Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Font Hardwood


Then I used the spokeshave and a knife to chamfer the corners, giving the piece a slight octagonal shape. Again, lots of grain-reading, as there are some funky reversals in this wood.

Next up we're the arms. It's time to round over the ends where the pins for the saw will go. I basically mark an equal amount on the top and side, then use a rasp to round over, removing my pencil marks. If it doesn't look right, I'll add more marks and remove a little more.

Wood Trunk Hardwood Building material Wood stain


Wood Artifact Art Sculpture Hardwood


Wood Composite material Natural material Hardwood Rectangle


Then I took a knife and chamfered the corners on the part of the arms which will hold the string. I didn't want to do too much, as I also need to shape the lower parts of the arms, but that's a job for tomorrow.

Wood Natural material Hardwood Human leg Fashion accessory


And that's it for today. I've got a day and a half in, and other than sharp corners on the lower parts of the arms, the saw is usable and not looking half-bad,
Thanks, Tom & Bandit. It's coming together.
 

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More shaping

This afternoon was spent shaping the cross-piece and the arms. First up, taking a spokeshave to the cross piece to thin it slightly in the middle, and make the ends match the arms nicely. It's not going to be a huge taper, but just a little bit looks a lot better than none. Plus I get to smooth out the surface now. I don't think I'll be doing any sanding on this saw, so I want to fix any little spots of tear-out from cutting and planing the pieces.

Wood Tool Wood stain Hardwood Engineering


Wood Rectangle Flooring Metal Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Font Hardwood


Then I used the spokeshave and a knife to chamfer the corners, giving the piece a slight octagonal shape. Again, lots of grain-reading, as there are some funky reversals in this wood.

Next up we're the arms. It's time to round over the ends where the pins for the saw will go. I basically mark an equal amount on the top and side, then use a rasp to round over, removing my pencil marks. If it doesn't look right, I'll add more marks and remove a little more.

Wood Trunk Hardwood Building material Wood stain


Wood Artifact Art Sculpture Hardwood


Wood Composite material Natural material Hardwood Rectangle


Then I took a knife and chamfered the corners on the part of the arms which will hold the string. I didn't want to do too much, as I also need to shape the lower parts of the arms, but that's a job for tomorrow.

Wood Natural material Hardwood Human leg Fashion accessory


And that's it for today. I've got a day and a half in, and other than sharp corners on the lower parts of the arms, the saw is usable and not looking half-bad,
Looking good dave.

Does the taper on the crosspiece also help to see the blade better as well?

On my hacksaw, because the crosspiece was so close to the saw blade I had to reshape it to a sort of oval shape because it kept getting between my line of sight and the blade - It was too thick to start with TBH which didn't help :)
 

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More shaping

This afternoon was spent shaping the cross-piece and the arms. First up, taking a spokeshave to the cross piece to thin it slightly in the middle, and make the ends match the arms nicely. It's not going to be a huge taper, but just a little bit looks a lot better than none. Plus I get to smooth out the surface now. I don't think I'll be doing any sanding on this saw, so I want to fix any little spots of tear-out from cutting and planing the pieces.

Wood Tool Wood stain Hardwood Engineering


Wood Rectangle Flooring Metal Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Font Hardwood


Then I used the spokeshave and a knife to chamfer the corners, giving the piece a slight octagonal shape. Again, lots of grain-reading, as there are some funky reversals in this wood.

Next up we're the arms. It's time to round over the ends where the pins for the saw will go. I basically mark an equal amount on the top and side, then use a rasp to round over, removing my pencil marks. If it doesn't look right, I'll add more marks and remove a little more.

Wood Trunk Hardwood Building material Wood stain


Wood Artifact Art Sculpture Hardwood


Wood Composite material Natural material Hardwood Rectangle


Then I took a knife and chamfered the corners on the part of the arms which will hold the string. I didn't want to do too much, as I also need to shape the lower parts of the arms, but that's a job for tomorrow.

Wood Natural material Hardwood Human leg Fashion accessory


And that's it for today. I've got a day and a half in, and other than sharp corners on the lower parts of the arms, the saw is usable and not looking half-bad,
Looking good so far, mistake I made with mine was not having the blade first:) got lucky that a 21" one fit.
LOL, will see how yours turns out before making a miniature model.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
More shaping

This afternoon was spent shaping the cross-piece and the arms. First up, taking a spokeshave to the cross piece to thin it slightly in the middle, and make the ends match the arms nicely. It's not going to be a huge taper, but just a little bit looks a lot better than none. Plus I get to smooth out the surface now. I don't think I'll be doing any sanding on this saw, so I want to fix any little spots of tear-out from cutting and planing the pieces.

Wood Tool Wood stain Hardwood Engineering


Wood Rectangle Flooring Metal Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Font Hardwood


Then I used the spokeshave and a knife to chamfer the corners, giving the piece a slight octagonal shape. Again, lots of grain-reading, as there are some funky reversals in this wood.

Next up we're the arms. It's time to round over the ends where the pins for the saw will go. I basically mark an equal amount on the top and side, then use a rasp to round over, removing my pencil marks. If it doesn't look right, I'll add more marks and remove a little more.

Wood Trunk Hardwood Building material Wood stain


Wood Artifact Art Sculpture Hardwood


Wood Composite material Natural material Hardwood Rectangle


Then I took a knife and chamfered the corners on the part of the arms which will hold the string. I didn't want to do too much, as I also need to shape the lower parts of the arms, but that's a job for tomorrow.

Wood Natural material Hardwood Human leg Fashion accessory


And that's it for today. I've got a day and a half in, and other than sharp corners on the lower parts of the arms, the saw is usable and not looking half-bad,
Mike, the taper just makes it lighter. I'm almost never looking past the cross-piece at the cut, but rather looking for the side and end of the saw. I saw right handed, and my head's about 4-6" to the left of the line the saw is on.

I'm also sawing more Chinese-style, where the blade is 45 from straight vertical in the frame most of the time. Watch Grandpa Amu saw on YouTube some time.

Andre, the only major fitment problems I've had were when I forgot I needed the length for the tenons on my first turning-saw. That didn't work so well.
 

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More shaping

This afternoon was spent shaping the cross-piece and the arms. First up, taking a spokeshave to the cross piece to thin it slightly in the middle, and make the ends match the arms nicely. It's not going to be a huge taper, but just a little bit looks a lot better than none. Plus I get to smooth out the surface now. I don't think I'll be doing any sanding on this saw, so I want to fix any little spots of tear-out from cutting and planing the pieces.

Wood Tool Wood stain Hardwood Engineering


Wood Rectangle Flooring Metal Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Font Hardwood


Then I used the spokeshave and a knife to chamfer the corners, giving the piece a slight octagonal shape. Again, lots of grain-reading, as there are some funky reversals in this wood.

Next up we're the arms. It's time to round over the ends where the pins for the saw will go. I basically mark an equal amount on the top and side, then use a rasp to round over, removing my pencil marks. If it doesn't look right, I'll add more marks and remove a little more.

Wood Trunk Hardwood Building material Wood stain


Wood Artifact Art Sculpture Hardwood


Wood Composite material Natural material Hardwood Rectangle


Then I took a knife and chamfered the corners on the part of the arms which will hold the string. I didn't want to do too much, as I also need to shape the lower parts of the arms, but that's a job for tomorrow.

Wood Natural material Hardwood Human leg Fashion accessory


And that's it for today. I've got a day and a half in, and other than sharp corners on the lower parts of the arms, the saw is usable and not looking half-bad,
Looking good!

You should really put out a book. You write clearly, and concisely, and don't use a lot of fancy tools.

Title it "Woodworking that's Good Enough".

It would sell a ton!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
More shaping

This afternoon was spent shaping the cross-piece and the arms. First up, taking a spokeshave to the cross piece to thin it slightly in the middle, and make the ends match the arms nicely. It's not going to be a huge taper, but just a little bit looks a lot better than none. Plus I get to smooth out the surface now. I don't think I'll be doing any sanding on this saw, so I want to fix any little spots of tear-out from cutting and planing the pieces.

Wood Tool Wood stain Hardwood Engineering


Wood Rectangle Flooring Metal Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Font Hardwood


Then I used the spokeshave and a knife to chamfer the corners, giving the piece a slight octagonal shape. Again, lots of grain-reading, as there are some funky reversals in this wood.

Next up we're the arms. It's time to round over the ends where the pins for the saw will go. I basically mark an equal amount on the top and side, then use a rasp to round over, removing my pencil marks. If it doesn't look right, I'll add more marks and remove a little more.

Wood Trunk Hardwood Building material Wood stain


Wood Artifact Art Sculpture Hardwood


Wood Composite material Natural material Hardwood Rectangle


Then I took a knife and chamfered the corners on the part of the arms which will hold the string. I didn't want to do too much, as I also need to shape the lower parts of the arms, but that's a job for tomorrow.

Wood Natural material Hardwood Human leg Fashion accessory


And that's it for today. I've got a day and a half in, and other than sharp corners on the lower parts of the arms, the saw is usable and not looking half-bad,
Thanks, Chuck. I suspect there's even less money in writing a book now than there was last time I did that back in the early 90s.

https://web.archive.org/web/20160310020323/http://davespicks.com/writing/mme/index.html
 

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More shaping

This afternoon was spent shaping the cross-piece and the arms. First up, taking a spokeshave to the cross piece to thin it slightly in the middle, and make the ends match the arms nicely. It's not going to be a huge taper, but just a little bit looks a lot better than none. Plus I get to smooth out the surface now. I don't think I'll be doing any sanding on this saw, so I want to fix any little spots of tear-out from cutting and planing the pieces.

Wood Tool Wood stain Hardwood Engineering


Wood Rectangle Flooring Metal Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Font Hardwood


Then I used the spokeshave and a knife to chamfer the corners, giving the piece a slight octagonal shape. Again, lots of grain-reading, as there are some funky reversals in this wood.

Next up we're the arms. It's time to round over the ends where the pins for the saw will go. I basically mark an equal amount on the top and side, then use a rasp to round over, removing my pencil marks. If it doesn't look right, I'll add more marks and remove a little more.

Wood Trunk Hardwood Building material Wood stain


Wood Artifact Art Sculpture Hardwood


Wood Composite material Natural material Hardwood Rectangle


Then I took a knife and chamfered the corners on the part of the arms which will hold the string. I didn't want to do too much, as I also need to shape the lower parts of the arms, but that's a job for tomorrow.

Wood Natural material Hardwood Human leg Fashion accessory


And that's it for today. I've got a day and a half in, and other than sharp corners on the lower parts of the arms, the saw is usable and not looking half-bad,
It's starting to get some character to it now Dave. I like the idea of no sanding, it will be like building it in the old days. I built one a few years ago to use when out hiking. It's always in the car ready for use. They're really cool and a lot of fun.
https://www.lumberjocks.com/projects/318737
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
More shaping

This afternoon was spent shaping the cross-piece and the arms. First up, taking a spokeshave to the cross piece to thin it slightly in the middle, and make the ends match the arms nicely. It's not going to be a huge taper, but just a little bit looks a lot better than none. Plus I get to smooth out the surface now. I don't think I'll be doing any sanding on this saw, so I want to fix any little spots of tear-out from cutting and planing the pieces.

Wood Tool Wood stain Hardwood Engineering


Wood Rectangle Flooring Metal Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Font Hardwood


Then I used the spokeshave and a knife to chamfer the corners, giving the piece a slight octagonal shape. Again, lots of grain-reading, as there are some funky reversals in this wood.

Next up we're the arms. It's time to round over the ends where the pins for the saw will go. I basically mark an equal amount on the top and side, then use a rasp to round over, removing my pencil marks. If it doesn't look right, I'll add more marks and remove a little more.

Wood Trunk Hardwood Building material Wood stain


Wood Artifact Art Sculpture Hardwood


Wood Composite material Natural material Hardwood Rectangle


Then I took a knife and chamfered the corners on the part of the arms which will hold the string. I didn't want to do too much, as I also need to shape the lower parts of the arms, but that's a job for tomorrow.

Wood Natural material Hardwood Human leg Fashion accessory


And that's it for today. I've got a day and a half in, and other than sharp corners on the lower parts of the arms, the saw is usable and not looking half-bad,
Thanks, Dave! For my "truck saw" I have a folding Japanese Silky Big Boy which comes in handy every once in a while.

For this one, I thought about making octagonal pins, since I don't really need continuous rotation with a coping saw, and in fact it annoys me most of the time. I've been looking at the Knew Concepts coping saw but that's just a crazy amount of money. Being able to put the blade at 45 and 90 degrees will probably be enough, but this time I stuck with the round pins (and it's a lot easier to drill round holes than octagons).

Maybe next time.

And yeah, I like finishing off the knife. Some days I'm good enough to make that work, and other days I have just enough trouble reading the grain that I end up with tear-out no matter what I do. We'll see how today goes. If I can get a nice surface, I might try kolrosing. Again, we'll see how the day goes.
 

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