LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Begining

I got a lot of work done today (YAH!!). Having been ill for the past couple of weeks, I have stayed away from my COLD shop. Couldn't stay away any longer.
I started with the frame, of course

Photobucket

Photobucket

I wanted to work on a known flat surface, however just simply couldn't. The whole reason for this project is to end with a known flat surface. Mark S has a great system using 2 bys, but I don't have a jointer, so that was out. Fortunately for me, my garage surface is REASONABLY flat, so it had to suffice.

From there, it was simply a matter of gluing the rows/columns in:

Photobucket

Before my hiatus, I had rough cut most of the parts I put together today. The only exception was the last 2 rows of small squares. I figured (rightly) that they would need to be cut to fit. As you can see, I ended up with 2 rows that were almost 2 times the other 4. That's what I was shooting for (or at least, I'll claim that, and you'll never know the difference!)

Photobucket

Next is the top/bottom and then the legs. I haven't decided what to make the top out of. I was going with MDF, then I thought maybe plywood with a hardboard attached to the top for easy replacement…any suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,252 Posts
The Begining

I got a lot of work done today (YAH!!). Having been ill for the past couple of weeks, I have stayed away from my COLD shop. Couldn't stay away any longer.
I started with the frame, of course

Photobucket

Photobucket

I wanted to work on a known flat surface, however just simply couldn't. The whole reason for this project is to end with a known flat surface. Mark S has a great system using 2 bys, but I don't have a jointer, so that was out. Fortunately for me, my garage surface is REASONABLY flat, so it had to suffice.

From there, it was simply a matter of gluing the rows/columns in:

Photobucket

Before my hiatus, I had rough cut most of the parts I put together today. The only exception was the last 2 rows of small squares. I figured (rightly) that they would need to be cut to fit. As you can see, I ended up with 2 rows that were almost 2 times the other 4. That's what I was shooting for (or at least, I'll claim that, and you'll never know the difference!)

Photobucket

Next is the top/bottom and then the legs. I haven't decided what to make the top out of. I was going with MDF, then I thought maybe plywood with a hardboard attached to the top for easy replacement…any suggestions?
Have you considered melamine? It is dense, chemical resistant, flat and cheap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,319 Posts
The Begining

I got a lot of work done today (YAH!!). Having been ill for the past couple of weeks, I have stayed away from my COLD shop. Couldn't stay away any longer.
I started with the frame, of course

Photobucket

Photobucket

I wanted to work on a known flat surface, however just simply couldn't. The whole reason for this project is to end with a known flat surface. Mark S has a great system using 2 bys, but I don't have a jointer, so that was out. Fortunately for me, my garage surface is REASONABLY flat, so it had to suffice.

From there, it was simply a matter of gluing the rows/columns in:

Photobucket

Before my hiatus, I had rough cut most of the parts I put together today. The only exception was the last 2 rows of small squares. I figured (rightly) that they would need to be cut to fit. As you can see, I ended up with 2 rows that were almost 2 times the other 4. That's what I was shooting for (or at least, I'll claim that, and you'll never know the difference!)

Photobucket

Next is the top/bottom and then the legs. I haven't decided what to make the top out of. I was going with MDF, then I thought maybe plywood with a hardboard attached to the top for easy replacement…any suggestions?
A hardboard insert like you suggested seems to be the best option. You can turn it over once and is't under $10 to replace. I woulld use mdf instead of plywood. Cheaper and perfectly flat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,304 Posts
The Begining

I got a lot of work done today (YAH!!). Having been ill for the past couple of weeks, I have stayed away from my COLD shop. Couldn't stay away any longer.
I started with the frame, of course

Photobucket

Photobucket

I wanted to work on a known flat surface, however just simply couldn't. The whole reason for this project is to end with a known flat surface. Mark S has a great system using 2 bys, but I don't have a jointer, so that was out. Fortunately for me, my garage surface is REASONABLY flat, so it had to suffice.

From there, it was simply a matter of gluing the rows/columns in:

Photobucket

Before my hiatus, I had rough cut most of the parts I put together today. The only exception was the last 2 rows of small squares. I figured (rightly) that they would need to be cut to fit. As you can see, I ended up with 2 rows that were almost 2 times the other 4. That's what I was shooting for (or at least, I'll claim that, and you'll never know the difference!)

Photobucket

Next is the top/bottom and then the legs. I haven't decided what to make the top out of. I was going with MDF, then I thought maybe plywood with a hardboard attached to the top for easy replacement…any suggestions?
Sturdy looking grid. Torsion boxes are great, but they can get awful heavy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
The Begining

I got a lot of work done today (YAH!!). Having been ill for the past couple of weeks, I have stayed away from my COLD shop. Couldn't stay away any longer.
I started with the frame, of course

Photobucket

Photobucket

I wanted to work on a known flat surface, however just simply couldn't. The whole reason for this project is to end with a known flat surface. Mark S has a great system using 2 bys, but I don't have a jointer, so that was out. Fortunately for me, my garage surface is REASONABLY flat, so it had to suffice.

From there, it was simply a matter of gluing the rows/columns in:

Photobucket

Before my hiatus, I had rough cut most of the parts I put together today. The only exception was the last 2 rows of small squares. I figured (rightly) that they would need to be cut to fit. As you can see, I ended up with 2 rows that were almost 2 times the other 4. That's what I was shooting for (or at least, I'll claim that, and you'll never know the difference!)

Photobucket

Next is the top/bottom and then the legs. I haven't decided what to make the top out of. I was going with MDF, then I thought maybe plywood with a hardboard attached to the top for easy replacement…any suggestions?
I have some timberstrand building studs ( engineered lumber ) left over from a recent framing project and was thinking of using those to build a flat surface for an assembly table. Anyone ever done that before?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The Top is Done.

Well, the top is done. I have to say, MDF is VERY heavy. I had heard that before, but didn't really get it. But it's done. I glued the MDF to the torsion box, and then attached the hardboard with 8 screws. Not sure I like them. But we'll see. If not, I can replace the hard board for less than 10 bucks, so it really is a non-factor.

Photobucket
That's my dog, Reagan…best darn dog in the world!

After I had routed the edges of the MDF/hardboard to match the frame, I had to trim it up a tad:
Photobucket
Yeah, that's me.

Next is the legs, then the bottom.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,319 Posts
The Top is Done.

Well, the top is done. I have to say, MDF is VERY heavy. I had heard that before, but didn't really get it. But it's done. I glued the MDF to the torsion box, and then attached the hardboard with 8 screws. Not sure I like them. But we'll see. If not, I can replace the hard board for less than 10 bucks, so it really is a non-factor.

Photobucket
That's my dog, Reagan…best darn dog in the world!

After I had routed the edges of the MDF/hardboard to match the frame, I had to trim it up a tad:
Photobucket
Yeah, that's me.

Next is the legs, then the bottom.
I learned just how heavy MDF was when I helped a friend move. It's heavy!

Looking good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
822 Posts
The Top is Done.

Well, the top is done. I have to say, MDF is VERY heavy. I had heard that before, but didn't really get it. But it's done. I glued the MDF to the torsion box, and then attached the hardboard with 8 screws. Not sure I like them. But we'll see. If not, I can replace the hard board for less than 10 bucks, so it really is a non-factor.

Photobucket
That's my dog, Reagan…best darn dog in the world!

After I had routed the edges of the MDF/hardboard to match the frame, I had to trim it up a tad:
Photobucket
Yeah, that's me.

Next is the legs, then the bottom.
Last time I picked up mdf at the box store…I had a young guy help me load it. I should have had him come along and help me unload it. Boy was that painful, did it before I had my should fixed. Next time, I'll wait till my son gets home….he can earn some of those groceries he's been shoveling down. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,886 Posts
The Top is Done.

Well, the top is done. I have to say, MDF is VERY heavy. I had heard that before, but didn't really get it. But it's done. I glued the MDF to the torsion box, and then attached the hardboard with 8 screws. Not sure I like them. But we'll see. If not, I can replace the hard board for less than 10 bucks, so it really is a non-factor.

Photobucket
That's my dog, Reagan…best darn dog in the world!

After I had routed the edges of the MDF/hardboard to match the frame, I had to trim it up a tad:
Photobucket
Yeah, that's me.

Next is the legs, then the bottom.
MDF is heavy stuff but what a versatile product it is. Keep at it Airfield, can't wait to see the result.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,304 Posts
The Top is Done.

Well, the top is done. I have to say, MDF is VERY heavy. I had heard that before, but didn't really get it. But it's done. I glued the MDF to the torsion box, and then attached the hardboard with 8 screws. Not sure I like them. But we'll see. If not, I can replace the hard board for less than 10 bucks, so it really is a non-factor.

Photobucket
That's my dog, Reagan…best darn dog in the world!

After I had routed the edges of the MDF/hardboard to match the frame, I had to trim it up a tad:
Photobucket
Yeah, that's me.

Next is the legs, then the bottom.
Nothing like a dead-flat assembly table. You could maybe screw some grab-handles on the sides to help when you have to move it around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,252 Posts
The Top is Done.

Well, the top is done. I have to say, MDF is VERY heavy. I had heard that before, but didn't really get it. But it's done. I glued the MDF to the torsion box, and then attached the hardboard with 8 screws. Not sure I like them. But we'll see. If not, I can replace the hard board for less than 10 bucks, so it really is a non-factor.

Photobucket
That's my dog, Reagan…best darn dog in the world!

After I had routed the edges of the MDF/hardboard to match the frame, I had to trim it up a tad:
Photobucket
Yeah, that's me.

Next is the legs, then the bottom.
Nice looking top. MDF is heavy but it is flat and cheap. It makes a nice top.

I can't wait to see the finished product. Then you can move on to something else. Maybe something for Reagan since he seems to be helping you in the shop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
918 Posts
The Top is Done.

Well, the top is done. I have to say, MDF is VERY heavy. I had heard that before, but didn't really get it. But it's done. I glued the MDF to the torsion box, and then attached the hardboard with 8 screws. Not sure I like them. But we'll see. If not, I can replace the hard board for less than 10 bucks, so it really is a non-factor.

Photobucket
That's my dog, Reagan…best darn dog in the world!

After I had routed the edges of the MDF/hardboard to match the frame, I had to trim it up a tad:
Photobucket
Yeah, that's me.

Next is the legs, then the bottom.
Very nice table, please show some detail of the method used to attach the legs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,452 Posts
The Top is Done.

Well, the top is done. I have to say, MDF is VERY heavy. I had heard that before, but didn't really get it. But it's done. I glued the MDF to the torsion box, and then attached the hardboard with 8 screws. Not sure I like them. But we'll see. If not, I can replace the hard board for less than 10 bucks, so it really is a non-factor.

Photobucket
That's my dog, Reagan…best darn dog in the world!

After I had routed the edges of the MDF/hardboard to match the frame, I had to trim it up a tad:
Photobucket
Yeah, that's me.

Next is the legs, then the bottom.
Oughta stay flat and never give up. I use MDF on the cut out table in the saddle shop. It doesn't dull knife blades and when it's a mess I flip it over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Legs are done

Original plans (located in my head) were to have a removable top. The concept was, since I have limited space, and the occasional need to vacate for a vehicle, I would break it down to a top, and collapsed legs (using hinges). However, as I stated earlier, I didn't truly anticipate the weight of MDF. So, although the top isn't actually secured to the legs, I doubt I'll be removing them very often.

I made boxes inside the frame to accept the legs:
Photobucket

This worked well, but still didn't give quite enough stability.
Photobucket

So, when adding the braces, I simply added two to the top.
Photobucket
Hard to see, but they rest right on the frame.

That was it.
Photobucket
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,252 Posts
Legs are done

Original plans (located in my head) were to have a removable top. The concept was, since I have limited space, and the occasional need to vacate for a vehicle, I would break it down to a top, and collapsed legs (using hinges). However, as I stated earlier, I didn't truly anticipate the weight of MDF. So, although the top isn't actually secured to the legs, I doubt I'll be removing them very often.

I made boxes inside the frame to accept the legs:
Photobucket

This worked well, but still didn't give quite enough stability.
Photobucket

So, when adding the braces, I simply added two to the top.
Photobucket
Hard to see, but they rest right on the frame.

That was it.
Photobucket
This is a good idea. Whether or not you will put it to routine use will depend on the annoyance factor. If you need the table and it is disassembled then it will take to to set up and move the vehicle. Conversely if you want to put the vehicle in the shop then you need to break down the table. It is a difficult issue. It would be wonderful to have a dedicated shop area but you, like the majority of us I suspect, must share the space with a vehicle.

I assume that the vehicle you are referencing is yours. I know that if there was a decision between my vehicle or my wife's sitting outside in the weather while I "played" in the shop there is no question whose it would be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
All done

Well, it's not as pretty as some, and not as elaborate either. But it will serve me well. Plus, an added couple of bonuses…

First, open storage:
Photobucket

And, it works well as an outfeeder table:
Photobucket

Thanks for looking. Cheers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,252 Posts
All done

Well, it's not as pretty as some, and not as elaborate either. But it will serve me well. Plus, an added couple of bonuses…

First, open storage:
Photobucket

And, it works well as an outfeeder table:
Photobucket

Thanks for looking. Cheers!
Nice job. Now let's put it to work.

By the way have you thought about adding a vice to the table?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
All done

Well, it's not as pretty as some, and not as elaborate either. But it will serve me well. Plus, an added couple of bonuses…

First, open storage:
Photobucket

And, it works well as an outfeeder table:
Photobucket

Thanks for looking. Cheers!
Great start but like Scott said you might think of adding a vice. If $$$ dollors are tight there is another way you can use a screw clamp attached underneath. There was an example in an old issue of woodsmith I will look it up and send it your way…
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top