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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ripping the Legs



As you may or may not know, last year I cut off my middle finger while ripping the legs out of the glued up blanks. I didn't have a splitter, riving knife, pawls, or blade guard on the table saw and was then surprised when my finger was gone.

This year, I put a Uniguard blade guard w/ riving knife/splitter on my table saw and have been using a MagSwitch religiously. With the courage engendered by my recent successes, I got back on the horse that kicked my ass. This evening, I was able to complete ripping all eight legs for the two night stands I was a third of the way through back in September.

While I don't have any pics of this rather mundane step (step #1 in the plans), I do think it was an important step for me as a woodworker and a man. I also realized that I have now roughed out all of the parts needed to assemble the four sides of the night stands. After a series of dadoes and tenons, I'll be able to glue them up. These night stands are important because they will complete what I started last year, finish the bedroom suite (so I can get rid of my particle board night stands), and it really illustrates how far I've come since the accident.

I will endeavor to update this blog as I make progress on these pieces. Thanks to all of the help that Eric & Joe have given me since the accident.
 

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Ripping the Legs



As you may or may not know, last year I cut off my middle finger while ripping the legs out of the glued up blanks. I didn't have a splitter, riving knife, pawls, or blade guard on the table saw and was then surprised when my finger was gone.

This year, I put a Uniguard blade guard w/ riving knife/splitter on my table saw and have been using a MagSwitch religiously. With the courage engendered by my recent successes, I got back on the horse that kicked my ass. This evening, I was able to complete ripping all eight legs for the two night stands I was a third of the way through back in September.

While I don't have any pics of this rather mundane step (step #1 in the plans), I do think it was an important step for me as a woodworker and a man. I also realized that I have now roughed out all of the parts needed to assemble the four sides of the night stands. After a series of dadoes and tenons, I'll be able to glue them up. These night stands are important because they will complete what I started last year, finish the bedroom suite (so I can get rid of my particle board night stands), and it really illustrates how far I've come since the accident.

I will endeavor to update this blog as I make progress on these pieces. Thanks to all of the help that Eric & Joe have given me since the accident.
It wouldn't really be safe to be taking pictures while ripping those, anyways.

Glad you're back - full force - but I can't even keep up with all your projects.
 

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Ripping the Legs



As you may or may not know, last year I cut off my middle finger while ripping the legs out of the glued up blanks. I didn't have a splitter, riving knife, pawls, or blade guard on the table saw and was then surprised when my finger was gone.

This year, I put a Uniguard blade guard w/ riving knife/splitter on my table saw and have been using a MagSwitch religiously. With the courage engendered by my recent successes, I got back on the horse that kicked my ass. This evening, I was able to complete ripping all eight legs for the two night stands I was a third of the way through back in September.

While I don't have any pics of this rather mundane step (step #1 in the plans), I do think it was an important step for me as a woodworker and a man. I also realized that I have now roughed out all of the parts needed to assemble the four sides of the night stands. After a series of dadoes and tenons, I'll be able to glue them up. These night stands are important because they will complete what I started last year, finish the bedroom suite (so I can get rid of my particle board night stands), and it really illustrates how far I've come since the accident.

I will endeavor to update this blog as I make progress on these pieces. Thanks to all of the help that Eric & Joe have given me since the accident.
I am sure you were "sweating bullets", at least I would have been. Congratulations for being able to persevere.
 

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Ripping the Legs



As you may or may not know, last year I cut off my middle finger while ripping the legs out of the glued up blanks. I didn't have a splitter, riving knife, pawls, or blade guard on the table saw and was then surprised when my finger was gone.

This year, I put a Uniguard blade guard w/ riving knife/splitter on my table saw and have been using a MagSwitch religiously. With the courage engendered by my recent successes, I got back on the horse that kicked my ass. This evening, I was able to complete ripping all eight legs for the two night stands I was a third of the way through back in September.

While I don't have any pics of this rather mundane step (step #1 in the plans), I do think it was an important step for me as a woodworker and a man. I also realized that I have now roughed out all of the parts needed to assemble the four sides of the night stands. After a series of dadoes and tenons, I'll be able to glue them up. These night stands are important because they will complete what I started last year, finish the bedroom suite (so I can get rid of my particle board night stands), and it really illustrates how far I've come since the accident.

I will endeavor to update this blog as I make progress on these pieces. Thanks to all of the help that Eric & Joe have given me since the accident.
Thats what you have to do.You really only have two choices…Quit woodworking or just start again. I am short 1 digit on 2 fingers of my left hand,5 weeks later I was ripping laminate strips 1/2" wide on the saw that bit me.Congrats on getting off the sawhorse and back on the saw and congrats on starting the project again,My project of doom was finished and installed without me(was display cases for a jewlry store) and about 2 years ago those cases were thrown into a dumpster by the new tenant of the building(original store moved back into the mall it left to be in the building that contained my project of doom) If I had been there I would have asked for the drawer front that bit me(yes I knew which one it was) and put it under the clock made from the blade that got me(it hangs on the wall directly in front of my saw as a constant reminder that it is ALWAYS time to think about safety)
 

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Ripping the Legs



As you may or may not know, last year I cut off my middle finger while ripping the legs out of the glued up blanks. I didn't have a splitter, riving knife, pawls, or blade guard on the table saw and was then surprised when my finger was gone.

This year, I put a Uniguard blade guard w/ riving knife/splitter on my table saw and have been using a MagSwitch religiously. With the courage engendered by my recent successes, I got back on the horse that kicked my ass. This evening, I was able to complete ripping all eight legs for the two night stands I was a third of the way through back in September.

While I don't have any pics of this rather mundane step (step #1 in the plans), I do think it was an important step for me as a woodworker and a man. I also realized that I have now roughed out all of the parts needed to assemble the four sides of the night stands. After a series of dadoes and tenons, I'll be able to glue them up. These night stands are important because they will complete what I started last year, finish the bedroom suite (so I can get rid of my particle board night stands), and it really illustrates how far I've come since the accident.

I will endeavor to update this blog as I make progress on these pieces. Thanks to all of the help that Eric & Joe have given me since the accident.
One of the first signs I'd like to make for my shop would be one that says "Respect Your Tools". Congrats on making it back from what I'm sure is every woodworker's nightmare.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ripping the Legs



As you may or may not know, last year I cut off my middle finger while ripping the legs out of the glued up blanks. I didn't have a splitter, riving knife, pawls, or blade guard on the table saw and was then surprised when my finger was gone.

This year, I put a Uniguard blade guard w/ riving knife/splitter on my table saw and have been using a MagSwitch religiously. With the courage engendered by my recent successes, I got back on the horse that kicked my ass. This evening, I was able to complete ripping all eight legs for the two night stands I was a third of the way through back in September.

While I don't have any pics of this rather mundane step (step #1 in the plans), I do think it was an important step for me as a woodworker and a man. I also realized that I have now roughed out all of the parts needed to assemble the four sides of the night stands. After a series of dadoes and tenons, I'll be able to glue them up. These night stands are important because they will complete what I started last year, finish the bedroom suite (so I can get rid of my particle board night stands), and it really illustrates how far I've come since the accident.

I will endeavor to update this blog as I make progress on these pieces. Thanks to all of the help that Eric & Joe have given me since the accident.
Thanks for all the support. It was tough going back out there, but as you might have noticed, I've been a busy little beaver. I loved the "sawhorse" comment. Funny. Hacksaw, that's a shame. Sorry bud. My new motto is: Safety, craftsmanship & safety, sprinkled with a liberal dose of safety…
 
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Ripping the Legs



As you may or may not know, last year I cut off my middle finger while ripping the legs out of the glued up blanks. I didn't have a splitter, riving knife, pawls, or blade guard on the table saw and was then surprised when my finger was gone.

This year, I put a Uniguard blade guard w/ riving knife/splitter on my table saw and have been using a MagSwitch religiously. With the courage engendered by my recent successes, I got back on the horse that kicked my ass. This evening, I was able to complete ripping all eight legs for the two night stands I was a third of the way through back in September.

While I don't have any pics of this rather mundane step (step #1 in the plans), I do think it was an important step for me as a woodworker and a man. I also realized that I have now roughed out all of the parts needed to assemble the four sides of the night stands. After a series of dadoes and tenons, I'll be able to glue them up. These night stands are important because they will complete what I started last year, finish the bedroom suite (so I can get rid of my particle board night stands), and it really illustrates how far I've come since the accident.

I will endeavor to update this blog as I make progress on these pieces. Thanks to all of the help that Eric & Joe have given me since the accident.
Going to be a great projects!
 

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Ripping the Legs



As you may or may not know, last year I cut off my middle finger while ripping the legs out of the glued up blanks. I didn't have a splitter, riving knife, pawls, or blade guard on the table saw and was then surprised when my finger was gone.

This year, I put a Uniguard blade guard w/ riving knife/splitter on my table saw and have been using a MagSwitch religiously. With the courage engendered by my recent successes, I got back on the horse that kicked my ass. This evening, I was able to complete ripping all eight legs for the two night stands I was a third of the way through back in September.

While I don't have any pics of this rather mundane step (step #1 in the plans), I do think it was an important step for me as a woodworker and a man. I also realized that I have now roughed out all of the parts needed to assemble the four sides of the night stands. After a series of dadoes and tenons, I'll be able to glue them up. These night stands are important because they will complete what I started last year, finish the bedroom suite (so I can get rid of my particle board night stands), and it really illustrates how far I've come since the accident.

I will endeavor to update this blog as I make progress on these pieces. Thanks to all of the help that Eric & Joe have given me since the accident.
I know this is a little late but thanks for sharing that story Captain. I've had a life changing accident and I know how hard it is to get back on the horse. Or, like Hacksaw, kill the horse, make something out of it and hang its lifeless body in the shop for a constant reminder. lol

Best,
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Going Topless...

I've been working the graveyard shift all week (which has seriously impeded my woodworking habit), helping my defacto brother-in-law with his concrete polishing business. It's pretty cool, especially if you start with the right concrete, dye, aggregate, etc. I was seriously thinking about making the tops for my night stands out of polished black concrete. It would look like granite, only I could do it myself (with his help). It would be water resistant, if sealed properly, so no need to hit the coaster with the glass of water in the middle of the night in the dark. If it didn't work out, I could always make oak tops and be no worse for the wear.

The technology for concrete countertops is amazing. It would also combine wood and stone, my two favorite manifestations of the earth element. At worst, it would be an interesting experiment. At best, it could launch a whole new facet to my woodworking. I already have a commission for a kitchen island. Imagine if I could produce a professional looking countertop without having to outsource the granite countertop. It would also be pretty cool looking on his website (which I wrote).

This is just a random pic from the internet, but sort of shows what I'm talking about:



For some reason, this reminds me of the vanity base I made for the Ikea basin…
 

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Going Topless...

I've been working the graveyard shift all week (which has seriously impeded my woodworking habit), helping my defacto brother-in-law with his concrete polishing business. It's pretty cool, especially if you start with the right concrete, dye, aggregate, etc. I was seriously thinking about making the tops for my night stands out of polished black concrete. It would look like granite, only I could do it myself (with his help). It would be water resistant, if sealed properly, so no need to hit the coaster with the glass of water in the middle of the night in the dark. If it didn't work out, I could always make oak tops and be no worse for the wear.

The technology for concrete countertops is amazing. It would also combine wood and stone, my two favorite manifestations of the earth element. At worst, it would be an interesting experiment. At best, it could launch a whole new facet to my woodworking. I already have a commission for a kitchen island. Imagine if I could produce a professional looking countertop without having to outsource the granite countertop. It would also be pretty cool looking on his website (which I wrote).

This is just a random pic from the internet, but sort of shows what I'm talking about:



For some reason, this reminds me of the vanity base I made for the Ikea basin…
I bought a book on concrete countertop making, because I wanted to do a completely DIY kitchen remodel but didn't want to do laminate or tile counters. By far the most interesting maker I've seen is Buddy Rhodes, and that's who's book I bought (from Amazon). Basically you hand pack it like clay, leaving a veiny surface like marble, then you skim coat the top with a filler of a different color and it makes a really neat effect. Overall, it didn't seem that difficult, just make some melamine molds and rent a concrete mixer. Since you do these upside down, you don't have to worry about being an expert in trowling to get a smooth surface.

I estimated for my kitchen it'd cost about $25/sqft, way cheaper than granite or solid surface. If you do end up trying this, I'd love to hear how it went, whether it was worth trying :)
 

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Going Topless...

I've been working the graveyard shift all week (which has seriously impeded my woodworking habit), helping my defacto brother-in-law with his concrete polishing business. It's pretty cool, especially if you start with the right concrete, dye, aggregate, etc. I was seriously thinking about making the tops for my night stands out of polished black concrete. It would look like granite, only I could do it myself (with his help). It would be water resistant, if sealed properly, so no need to hit the coaster with the glass of water in the middle of the night in the dark. If it didn't work out, I could always make oak tops and be no worse for the wear.

The technology for concrete countertops is amazing. It would also combine wood and stone, my two favorite manifestations of the earth element. At worst, it would be an interesting experiment. At best, it could launch a whole new facet to my woodworking. I already have a commission for a kitchen island. Imagine if I could produce a professional looking countertop without having to outsource the granite countertop. It would also be pretty cool looking on his website (which I wrote).

This is just a random pic from the internet, but sort of shows what I'm talking about:



For some reason, this reminds me of the vanity base I made for the Ikea basin…
I did a little looking at concrete when I started my kitchen but I found a great sorce for Corian at Dupont's factory outlet. I paid about $3.00 Sq Ft for Corian so I made my own counter.

It probably cost as much for the mastic glue as I paid for the corian.

Very easy to work with. You use wood working router bits etc. Not like cement or Granite.
 

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Going Topless...

I've been working the graveyard shift all week (which has seriously impeded my woodworking habit), helping my defacto brother-in-law with his concrete polishing business. It's pretty cool, especially if you start with the right concrete, dye, aggregate, etc. I was seriously thinking about making the tops for my night stands out of polished black concrete. It would look like granite, only I could do it myself (with his help). It would be water resistant, if sealed properly, so no need to hit the coaster with the glass of water in the middle of the night in the dark. If it didn't work out, I could always make oak tops and be no worse for the wear.

The technology for concrete countertops is amazing. It would also combine wood and stone, my two favorite manifestations of the earth element. At worst, it would be an interesting experiment. At best, it could launch a whole new facet to my woodworking. I already have a commission for a kitchen island. Imagine if I could produce a professional looking countertop without having to outsource the granite countertop. It would also be pretty cool looking on his website (which I wrote).

This is just a random pic from the internet, but sort of shows what I'm talking about:



For some reason, this reminds me of the vanity base I made for the Ikea basin…
sounds like an interesting project
 

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Going Topless...

I've been working the graveyard shift all week (which has seriously impeded my woodworking habit), helping my defacto brother-in-law with his concrete polishing business. It's pretty cool, especially if you start with the right concrete, dye, aggregate, etc. I was seriously thinking about making the tops for my night stands out of polished black concrete. It would look like granite, only I could do it myself (with his help). It would be water resistant, if sealed properly, so no need to hit the coaster with the glass of water in the middle of the night in the dark. If it didn't work out, I could always make oak tops and be no worse for the wear.

The technology for concrete countertops is amazing. It would also combine wood and stone, my two favorite manifestations of the earth element. At worst, it would be an interesting experiment. At best, it could launch a whole new facet to my woodworking. I already have a commission for a kitchen island. Imagine if I could produce a professional looking countertop without having to outsource the granite countertop. It would also be pretty cool looking on his website (which I wrote).

This is just a random pic from the internet, but sort of shows what I'm talking about:



For some reason, this reminds me of the vanity base I made for the Ikea basin…
i love this…and something I would like to learn about…I want to start with a counter for an outside kitchen/bbq…but i have seen some very nice counter tops at very low prices…
 

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Going Topless...

I've been working the graveyard shift all week (which has seriously impeded my woodworking habit), helping my defacto brother-in-law with his concrete polishing business. It's pretty cool, especially if you start with the right concrete, dye, aggregate, etc. I was seriously thinking about making the tops for my night stands out of polished black concrete. It would look like granite, only I could do it myself (with his help). It would be water resistant, if sealed properly, so no need to hit the coaster with the glass of water in the middle of the night in the dark. If it didn't work out, I could always make oak tops and be no worse for the wear.

The technology for concrete countertops is amazing. It would also combine wood and stone, my two favorite manifestations of the earth element. At worst, it would be an interesting experiment. At best, it could launch a whole new facet to my woodworking. I already have a commission for a kitchen island. Imagine if I could produce a professional looking countertop without having to outsource the granite countertop. It would also be pretty cool looking on his website (which I wrote).

This is just a random pic from the internet, but sort of shows what I'm talking about:



For some reason, this reminds me of the vanity base I made for the Ikea basin…
If you're working on a small area, I've also heard you can get offcuts from granite suppliers for dirt cheap, if you're willing to take the time to finish the edges yourself.
 
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Going Topless...

I've been working the graveyard shift all week (which has seriously impeded my woodworking habit), helping my defacto brother-in-law with his concrete polishing business. It's pretty cool, especially if you start with the right concrete, dye, aggregate, etc. I was seriously thinking about making the tops for my night stands out of polished black concrete. It would look like granite, only I could do it myself (with his help). It would be water resistant, if sealed properly, so no need to hit the coaster with the glass of water in the middle of the night in the dark. If it didn't work out, I could always make oak tops and be no worse for the wear.

The technology for concrete countertops is amazing. It would also combine wood and stone, my two favorite manifestations of the earth element. At worst, it would be an interesting experiment. At best, it could launch a whole new facet to my woodworking. I already have a commission for a kitchen island. Imagine if I could produce a professional looking countertop without having to outsource the granite countertop. It would also be pretty cool looking on his website (which I wrote).

This is just a random pic from the internet, but sort of shows what I'm talking about:



For some reason, this reminds me of the vanity base I made for the Ikea basin…
Cool looking project!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Some Assembly Required...

Today, I took the rough parts and managed to achieve a few dry fits. The first one was to make sure the dadoes and tenons fit. The second one was to see how it looked with the bow cut out of the bottom piece and with the pre-finished panels installed.

A couple of thoughts: be sure your table saw is waxed properly when cutting tenons like this. It helps if you don't have to use force to push the piece through the saw. I realized I'm already using some of the stuff I learned from watching TheWoodWhisperer's videos on the "Gadget Station". Anal retentive grain-matching being one of them.

As my own worst critic, I will say that I could've done a better job backing up the cuts to prevent chip-out. To make the night stands match the crappy job I did a year ago with the dresser, tear-out wasn't an issue. From now on, in order to take things to a higher level, I will be dealing with this issue better.

I finished the panels with two coats of TransTint Reddish Brown #6003. It's what I used on the bed and dresser, so it'll complete the set. I might be tempted to go over everything with the Mission Oak gel stain that polymerizes into a relatively tough coat. This should brown it down and "antique" it. That would be a major undertaking, but would assuage my angst over such an immature finish as just aniline dye in alcohol.

The next step is to sand all of the parts, and possibly finish them too. I had problems with wiping the finish on the structure without making a darker section on the panels. I will be sanding these to 220, like I did the others, but from now on, I will be sanding to 150. If you've ever felt a 100+ year old Stickley, you can feel the grain. I'd like to go for that tactile faithfulness.

BTW, I beefed up the legs from 3/4 to 1 1/2 (which is where I got my boo-boo). I think this lends a lot of mass to the night stands. I felt it was very successful on the dresser. Why spend so much money and effort on building something with flimsy legs. The way I glued up the legs, you can't even tell that they're two pieces of wood.

Here's where the wax is helpful:


A backer board will help with chipout:


First dry-fit:


Working single-handed:


Second dry-fit:


Notice the labeling (inside, part, etc.):


Alcohol based aniline dye:


All parts need sanding:
 

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Some Assembly Required...

Today, I took the rough parts and managed to achieve a few dry fits. The first one was to make sure the dadoes and tenons fit. The second one was to see how it looked with the bow cut out of the bottom piece and with the pre-finished panels installed.

A couple of thoughts: be sure your table saw is waxed properly when cutting tenons like this. It helps if you don't have to use force to push the piece through the saw. I realized I'm already using some of the stuff I learned from watching TheWoodWhisperer's videos on the "Gadget Station". Anal retentive grain-matching being one of them.

As my own worst critic, I will say that I could've done a better job backing up the cuts to prevent chip-out. To make the night stands match the crappy job I did a year ago with the dresser, tear-out wasn't an issue. From now on, in order to take things to a higher level, I will be dealing with this issue better.

I finished the panels with two coats of TransTint Reddish Brown #6003. It's what I used on the bed and dresser, so it'll complete the set. I might be tempted to go over everything with the Mission Oak gel stain that polymerizes into a relatively tough coat. This should brown it down and "antique" it. That would be a major undertaking, but would assuage my angst over such an immature finish as just aniline dye in alcohol.

The next step is to sand all of the parts, and possibly finish them too. I had problems with wiping the finish on the structure without making a darker section on the panels. I will be sanding these to 220, like I did the others, but from now on, I will be sanding to 150. If you've ever felt a 100+ year old Stickley, you can feel the grain. I'd like to go for that tactile faithfulness.

BTW, I beefed up the legs from 3/4 to 1 1/2 (which is where I got my boo-boo). I think this lends a lot of mass to the night stands. I felt it was very successful on the dresser. Why spend so much money and effort on building something with flimsy legs. The way I glued up the legs, you can't even tell that they're two pieces of wood.

Here's where the wax is helpful:


A backer board will help with chipout:


First dry-fit:


Working single-handed:


Second dry-fit:


Notice the labeling (inside, part, etc.):


Alcohol based aniline dye:


All parts need sanding:
That is a nice looking color on the wood. Good idea adding the color before assembly since any shrinkage or movement might reveal unstained wood.
 

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Some Assembly Required...

Today, I took the rough parts and managed to achieve a few dry fits. The first one was to make sure the dadoes and tenons fit. The second one was to see how it looked with the bow cut out of the bottom piece and with the pre-finished panels installed.

A couple of thoughts: be sure your table saw is waxed properly when cutting tenons like this. It helps if you don't have to use force to push the piece through the saw. I realized I'm already using some of the stuff I learned from watching TheWoodWhisperer's videos on the "Gadget Station". Anal retentive grain-matching being one of them.

As my own worst critic, I will say that I could've done a better job backing up the cuts to prevent chip-out. To make the night stands match the crappy job I did a year ago with the dresser, tear-out wasn't an issue. From now on, in order to take things to a higher level, I will be dealing with this issue better.

I finished the panels with two coats of TransTint Reddish Brown #6003. It's what I used on the bed and dresser, so it'll complete the set. I might be tempted to go over everything with the Mission Oak gel stain that polymerizes into a relatively tough coat. This should brown it down and "antique" it. That would be a major undertaking, but would assuage my angst over such an immature finish as just aniline dye in alcohol.

The next step is to sand all of the parts, and possibly finish them too. I had problems with wiping the finish on the structure without making a darker section on the panels. I will be sanding these to 220, like I did the others, but from now on, I will be sanding to 150. If you've ever felt a 100+ year old Stickley, you can feel the grain. I'd like to go for that tactile faithfulness.

BTW, I beefed up the legs from 3/4 to 1 1/2 (which is where I got my boo-boo). I think this lends a lot of mass to the night stands. I felt it was very successful on the dresser. Why spend so much money and effort on building something with flimsy legs. The way I glued up the legs, you can't even tell that they're two pieces of wood.

Here's where the wax is helpful:


A backer board will help with chipout:


First dry-fit:


Working single-handed:


Second dry-fit:


Notice the labeling (inside, part, etc.):


Alcohol based aniline dye:


All parts need sanding:
Keep it up. You are making good progress. I think that the glazing idea would be a good addition. It brings a good contrast and depth to the finish and highlights the wood. I use the Rockler mission glaze on my pieces.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Some Assembly Required...

Today, I took the rough parts and managed to achieve a few dry fits. The first one was to make sure the dadoes and tenons fit. The second one was to see how it looked with the bow cut out of the bottom piece and with the pre-finished panels installed.

A couple of thoughts: be sure your table saw is waxed properly when cutting tenons like this. It helps if you don't have to use force to push the piece through the saw. I realized I'm already using some of the stuff I learned from watching TheWoodWhisperer's videos on the "Gadget Station". Anal retentive grain-matching being one of them.

As my own worst critic, I will say that I could've done a better job backing up the cuts to prevent chip-out. To make the night stands match the crappy job I did a year ago with the dresser, tear-out wasn't an issue. From now on, in order to take things to a higher level, I will be dealing with this issue better.

I finished the panels with two coats of TransTint Reddish Brown #6003. It's what I used on the bed and dresser, so it'll complete the set. I might be tempted to go over everything with the Mission Oak gel stain that polymerizes into a relatively tough coat. This should brown it down and "antique" it. That would be a major undertaking, but would assuage my angst over such an immature finish as just aniline dye in alcohol.

The next step is to sand all of the parts, and possibly finish them too. I had problems with wiping the finish on the structure without making a darker section on the panels. I will be sanding these to 220, like I did the others, but from now on, I will be sanding to 150. If you've ever felt a 100+ year old Stickley, you can feel the grain. I'd like to go for that tactile faithfulness.

BTW, I beefed up the legs from 3/4 to 1 1/2 (which is where I got my boo-boo). I think this lends a lot of mass to the night stands. I felt it was very successful on the dresser. Why spend so much money and effort on building something with flimsy legs. The way I glued up the legs, you can't even tell that they're two pieces of wood.

Here's where the wax is helpful:


A backer board will help with chipout:


First dry-fit:


Working single-handed:


Second dry-fit:


Notice the labeling (inside, part, etc.):


Alcohol based aniline dye:


All parts need sanding:
Thanks Vince. I've got a thread going on the Forums about a Stickley finish. It looks like that Mission Oak glaze will be part of my final answer.

Todd, that trick was actually in the plans, but I noticed that a lot of people are doing it. I think Marc actually mentions putting one coat of clearcoat on the panels too. After cross-cutting the panels, I lost my indicator marks for bookmatching them, but they're not very figured, so it was no big loss.

Pat (I think we might be related), I got the plans for the bed, dresser, and the night stands from Wood Magazine. I've been pretty happy with the plans. They even replaced the copy I lost during the accident. One thing I've noticed about these plans is they don't group similar machining processes together. They focus on building each part as a coherent step. When I've got the dado blade setup, I'll make the dadoes for the sides, doors, drawers, etc. as long as they all use the same setup. In the plans, they make the sides, then a couple of days later have you do the exact same setup to make the doors. I've also got several plans from Plansnow.com. I'm hoping some laminated bow arm Morris chairs are after the dining room suite.

Notice I put the centerlines on (tape at joint) prematurely. I was tired at the end of the day and was thinking of doing the glueups. Then I realized I hadn't sanded anything but the panels yet. I'll have to take the tape off, sand all the parts, then relocate the centerlines.
 
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Some Assembly Required...

Today, I took the rough parts and managed to achieve a few dry fits. The first one was to make sure the dadoes and tenons fit. The second one was to see how it looked with the bow cut out of the bottom piece and with the pre-finished panels installed.

A couple of thoughts: be sure your table saw is waxed properly when cutting tenons like this. It helps if you don't have to use force to push the piece through the saw. I realized I'm already using some of the stuff I learned from watching TheWoodWhisperer's videos on the "Gadget Station". Anal retentive grain-matching being one of them.

As my own worst critic, I will say that I could've done a better job backing up the cuts to prevent chip-out. To make the night stands match the crappy job I did a year ago with the dresser, tear-out wasn't an issue. From now on, in order to take things to a higher level, I will be dealing with this issue better.

I finished the panels with two coats of TransTint Reddish Brown #6003. It's what I used on the bed and dresser, so it'll complete the set. I might be tempted to go over everything with the Mission Oak gel stain that polymerizes into a relatively tough coat. This should brown it down and "antique" it. That would be a major undertaking, but would assuage my angst over such an immature finish as just aniline dye in alcohol.

The next step is to sand all of the parts, and possibly finish them too. I had problems with wiping the finish on the structure without making a darker section on the panels. I will be sanding these to 220, like I did the others, but from now on, I will be sanding to 150. If you've ever felt a 100+ year old Stickley, you can feel the grain. I'd like to go for that tactile faithfulness.

BTW, I beefed up the legs from 3/4 to 1 1/2 (which is where I got my boo-boo). I think this lends a lot of mass to the night stands. I felt it was very successful on the dresser. Why spend so much money and effort on building something with flimsy legs. The way I glued up the legs, you can't even tell that they're two pieces of wood.

Here's where the wax is helpful:


A backer board will help with chipout:


First dry-fit:


Working single-handed:


Second dry-fit:


Notice the labeling (inside, part, etc.):


Alcohol based aniline dye:


All parts need sanding:
Nice looking panel.
 
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