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My woodworking addiction only takes place in the garage. Weather in Missouri is rougher than you might think. Hey its in the middle of the country it should not be to hot and not to cold right? CRAP its hot. We get triple digit heat in the summer and minus double digits in the winter and humidity so thick you can bathe in it. My working time in the garage is cut down to 6 months if things go well for me. BUMMER!

Who, living in a location with both hot and cold extremes, has conquered this ?
 

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I live in what is generally known as a 'temperate' climate. Bull'. In winter my garage/shop is freezing (finishes won't go off) and in summer I bake (glue dries when you look at it). In winter I block up all he gaps around the up and over garage door and bring in a fan heater. In summer I have everything open, strip down and if its really bad the fan (without the heat). I won't say I've conquered it but its not conquered me, yet.
 

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I conquered it by moving to N. AZ. Arid, so no rust, temps in the summer are seldom above 90 and then for only a few hours. It does get cold but no where near minus single digits. Shop is easy to heat with a small wall mounted gas heater.
 

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I know what you mean pal.
Living in Chicago, I've gone from cold weather clothes to summer clothes in one day to be able to work out in the garage.
Now, moving to Florida, I'm "re-designing" a lot of my long pants to "work shorts"...LOL
 

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I have conquered this thus far by saving my woodworking for my retirement…. sad…. very sad… OR, when we get our own house and I can setup an A/Ced shop space, whichever one comes first lol.
 

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I live in central KY, where we have a term for humidity, liquid air. I run a 12,000 BTU window unit along with a dehumidifier. I've read that for every 15% gain in relative humidity, that will change the moisture content of a piece of wood by almost 2%. Well worth to $300 investment, if not for my comfort, but for my projects.
 

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I have a wood stove for the winter….fans right now for the summer (though they do not cool it down enough)....Usually in the summer, I can use the shop in the early morning (till it gets hot here too - high 90's mostly but there are weeks to months of 100+) and evening when it cools - luckily we have a cool down at night here.

It certainly does cut down on my shop time though. I am working on putting in some solar cooling - going to try the passive system Dennisgrosen was kind enough to provide to me….underground pipes that cool the air (a simplistic description) - I have the pit started and the piping on hand….so will see what that will give me.

My shop has no insulation as it is a converted horse barn….but it does have trees around it that keep the heat down untill the afternoon. I will insulate and dry wall the inside when I can get the time…that should allow some more time in the shop….but I am not retired yet so will have to do the work during my "leisure" time for all this.
 

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Winter isn't a serious problem for me. I typically heat with a little propane camping heater and it does just fine. Summers on the hot, sticky gulf coast however are another story all together…

To get my shop tolerable, I insulated the ceiling, and the overhead doors, I sealed up the garage doors with that foam rubber strip stuff, and then installed a 14K BTU portable Air Conditioner. Unfortunately I do not have the electrical set up to run everything I need to at once, so the AC tends to cool it off enough to get working, then shut down and run my tools etc…

I need a sub panel in my shop bad… So in my upgrade process, the sheet rock is coming out to do the sub panel and branch circuits, so I might as well insulate the walls at the same time right?
 

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Hey Spaids,
I tried looking at your shop pictures, but couldn't figure out the answer to one of my questions. Is the garage and attached garage? If so, were all the walls and the ceiling insulated? It's my understanding that all walls that are shared with the main living space in a home have to be insulated. The others don't. Once I insulated the rest of my garage, it does stay much more temperate. I can usually work from about 9 am -1 pm before it gets too hot assuming a high of about 95 degrees for that day. the biggest flaw with my setup is a south facing garage and an uninsulated garage door. nothing I can do about that right now though. I have found that the insulation makes a much bigger difference in winter. It seems to keep some heat that leaks from the house.
 

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I live in north mississippi and am also stuck in the garage. Man the temps here are killer,(literally). Its so hot and humid that the utility companies have started reconnecting peoples utilities who neglected to pay their bills. I am using a coupla high velocity fans right now and it definatly helps but Im prolly going to clean the lawn mower shed out this weekend. It already has electricity so Im going to cut a hole and install a window AC unit. Im not to worried about lost energy as it will be an enormous improvement compared to my current conditions. This prolly doesn't help you that much so I guess at this time I am welcoming you to come use my lawn mower shed anytime you want, haha. Good luck and stay hydrated.
 

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I know what you mean. Here in north-central Mass, it seems like I was just peeling my frozen fingers off of the cold cast iron surfaces. Now, I am dripping sweat all over those same surfaces.

I think that May 14 was the nice day this year :).
 

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Fortunately, my garage/shop has central heat/air connected to the house. Stays comfortable all year. I'm going to close off part for a full shop and cut a vent in the side of the duct for the shop. Just think how the folks survived before central heat and air. How did we Baby Boomers survive those early years?????
 

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I certainly know how you feel…I live in North Texas and it's been just around 100 degrees for the past 3 weeks, well above average for June…I am retired now so I limit my time in my garage shop to mornings only…Ron
 

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Well I'm here a little north of Houston and the summers are brutal. I wish I would have insulated the shop, but the money wasn't there. I have 6 box fans running at once and it is still miserable. I think having a metal roof also just makes it like an oven. It was 108 in there at 3:00 on Tuesday. Needless to say I work out there in the mornings and the evenings. Keep the fluids coming.
 

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Live here in Oklahoma, so I understand what your going through. My last 2 shops have been climate controlled by A/C and a gas heater. My new shop will also be climate controlled as well. In the winter when I get ready to do finish work I use a oil filled electric heater and turn off the gas heater till the fumes clear. The shop is already warm when I turn off the gas heater so the electric heater works fine for that short period of time.
 

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Funny you should call where you live Misery. That's exactly what I call it. But the home that we bought was built 5 years ago and the two extended garage is heated and insulated. I had a 30X30 steel building built for a woodworking shop and it's insulated and heated with a 55 gallon barrel that is vented and used to heat and burn up scraps. But I have another problem. My wife has M.S. so we just bought a home in Goodyear, Arizona and should be moving in september. Seems like you can't sell anything around here so looks like we are going to have this place down by Lake of The Ozarks and a home in Arizona. You might get an evap cooler for your shop but it will cool but bring in more moisture.
DeptutyDawg
 

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Our winters in West Texas are really not bad at all. It does get hot in the summer, but our humidity is low, so it's generally tolerable. I have always worked in a shop with nothing but fans and sweat to cool. As long as I've got air moving, I 'm OK.
 
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