LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Interesting barn trusses

A couple of years ago, the family took a roadtrip out to the east coast. I stumbled across these pictures and thought I'd share them, just for the curiosity they present.

While visiting a heritage site called Ministers Island in New Brunswick, we explored the buildings on this site (the summer cottage of Sir William Van Horne, engineer behind building the railroad across Canada).

The buildings on the site were built around 1892, though the original settlement on the island was about 100 years earlier by an Anglican priest (thus the name).

Ok…enough history lessons.

The thing that really intrigued me was when we went into the barn…which is impressive in size alone, but even moreso because of the way it was constructed.

The only skilled workers available in the area at the time were boatbuilders, so this is who Van Horne commissioned to construct the buildings. The result is that the truss architecture in the barn is very unusual and if you know what to look for, you will see dramatic similarities between the truss structure of the roof and the construction of a large turn of the century ship. The boatbuilders knew little of building construction, so they relied on their knowledge of boatbuilding to frame up the barn.

Here are a couple of pictures….they don't do it justice, but it's unusual to look at and impressive to see in person. Certainly not something you'll find in your local subdivision. :)





 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,242 Posts
Interesting barn trusses

A couple of years ago, the family took a roadtrip out to the east coast. I stumbled across these pictures and thought I'd share them, just for the curiosity they present.

While visiting a heritage site called Ministers Island in New Brunswick, we explored the buildings on this site (the summer cottage of Sir William Van Horne, engineer behind building the railroad across Canada).

The buildings on the site were built around 1892, though the original settlement on the island was about 100 years earlier by an Anglican priest (thus the name).

Ok…enough history lessons.

The thing that really intrigued me was when we went into the barn…which is impressive in size alone, but even moreso because of the way it was constructed.

The only skilled workers available in the area at the time were boatbuilders, so this is who Van Horne commissioned to construct the buildings. The result is that the truss architecture in the barn is very unusual and if you know what to look for, you will see dramatic similarities between the truss structure of the roof and the construction of a large turn of the century ship. The boatbuilders knew little of building construction, so they relied on their knowledge of boatbuilding to frame up the barn.

Here are a couple of pictures….they don't do it justice, but it's unusual to look at and impressive to see in person. Certainly not something you'll find in your local subdivision. :)





now that is cool … ive never seen framing like that before. Thanks for sharing
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,052 Posts
Interesting barn trusses

A couple of years ago, the family took a roadtrip out to the east coast. I stumbled across these pictures and thought I'd share them, just for the curiosity they present.

While visiting a heritage site called Ministers Island in New Brunswick, we explored the buildings on this site (the summer cottage of Sir William Van Horne, engineer behind building the railroad across Canada).

The buildings on the site were built around 1892, though the original settlement on the island was about 100 years earlier by an Anglican priest (thus the name).

Ok…enough history lessons.

The thing that really intrigued me was when we went into the barn…which is impressive in size alone, but even moreso because of the way it was constructed.

The only skilled workers available in the area at the time were boatbuilders, so this is who Van Horne commissioned to construct the buildings. The result is that the truss architecture in the barn is very unusual and if you know what to look for, you will see dramatic similarities between the truss structure of the roof and the construction of a large turn of the century ship. The boatbuilders knew little of building construction, so they relied on their knowledge of boatbuilding to frame up the barn.

Here are a couple of pictures….they don't do it justice, but it's unusual to look at and impressive to see in person. Certainly not something you'll find in your local subdivision. :)





That is very neat, could you tell us, were the crossmembers sort of half-lapped and then pegged? Or just pegged.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118,619 Posts
Interesting barn trusses

A couple of years ago, the family took a roadtrip out to the east coast. I stumbled across these pictures and thought I'd share them, just for the curiosity they present.

While visiting a heritage site called Ministers Island in New Brunswick, we explored the buildings on this site (the summer cottage of Sir William Van Horne, engineer behind building the railroad across Canada).

The buildings on the site were built around 1892, though the original settlement on the island was about 100 years earlier by an Anglican priest (thus the name).

Ok…enough history lessons.

The thing that really intrigued me was when we went into the barn…which is impressive in size alone, but even moreso because of the way it was constructed.

The only skilled workers available in the area at the time were boatbuilders, so this is who Van Horne commissioned to construct the buildings. The result is that the truss architecture in the barn is very unusual and if you know what to look for, you will see dramatic similarities between the truss structure of the roof and the construction of a large turn of the century ship. The boatbuilders knew little of building construction, so they relied on their knowledge of boatbuilding to frame up the barn.

Here are a couple of pictures….they don't do it justice, but it's unusual to look at and impressive to see in person. Certainly not something you'll find in your local subdivision. :)





Very cool
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Interesting barn trusses

A couple of years ago, the family took a roadtrip out to the east coast. I stumbled across these pictures and thought I'd share them, just for the curiosity they present.

While visiting a heritage site called Ministers Island in New Brunswick, we explored the buildings on this site (the summer cottage of Sir William Van Horne, engineer behind building the railroad across Canada).

The buildings on the site were built around 1892, though the original settlement on the island was about 100 years earlier by an Anglican priest (thus the name).

Ok…enough history lessons.

The thing that really intrigued me was when we went into the barn…which is impressive in size alone, but even moreso because of the way it was constructed.

The only skilled workers available in the area at the time were boatbuilders, so this is who Van Horne commissioned to construct the buildings. The result is that the truss architecture in the barn is very unusual and if you know what to look for, you will see dramatic similarities between the truss structure of the roof and the construction of a large turn of the century ship. The boatbuilders knew little of building construction, so they relied on their knowledge of boatbuilding to frame up the barn.

Here are a couple of pictures….they don't do it justice, but it's unusual to look at and impressive to see in person. Certainly not something you'll find in your local subdivision. :)





I believe they were just pegged.

If you look at the joint between the vertical supports and the ones that are leaning a few degrees off vertical you'll also see some iron rings around the angled butt joints…I'm not sure if this is typical boatbuilding joinery or not, but it's a novel idea and forces a tighter joint as the weight of the roof pushes them down.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
25,692 Posts
Interesting barn trusses

A couple of years ago, the family took a roadtrip out to the east coast. I stumbled across these pictures and thought I'd share them, just for the curiosity they present.

While visiting a heritage site called Ministers Island in New Brunswick, we explored the buildings on this site (the summer cottage of Sir William Van Horne, engineer behind building the railroad across Canada).

The buildings on the site were built around 1892, though the original settlement on the island was about 100 years earlier by an Anglican priest (thus the name).

Ok…enough history lessons.

The thing that really intrigued me was when we went into the barn…which is impressive in size alone, but even moreso because of the way it was constructed.

The only skilled workers available in the area at the time were boatbuilders, so this is who Van Horne commissioned to construct the buildings. The result is that the truss architecture in the barn is very unusual and if you know what to look for, you will see dramatic similarities between the truss structure of the roof and the construction of a large turn of the century ship. The boatbuilders knew little of building construction, so they relied on their knowledge of boatbuilding to frame up the barn.

Here are a couple of pictures….they don't do it justice, but it's unusual to look at and impressive to see in person. Certainly not something you'll find in your local subdivision. :)





Interesting to see how they framed that barn. Lost a lot of hay storage space compared to how Gothic rofs are farmed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
Interesting barn trusses

A couple of years ago, the family took a roadtrip out to the east coast. I stumbled across these pictures and thought I'd share them, just for the curiosity they present.

While visiting a heritage site called Ministers Island in New Brunswick, we explored the buildings on this site (the summer cottage of Sir William Van Horne, engineer behind building the railroad across Canada).

The buildings on the site were built around 1892, though the original settlement on the island was about 100 years earlier by an Anglican priest (thus the name).

Ok…enough history lessons.

The thing that really intrigued me was when we went into the barn…which is impressive in size alone, but even moreso because of the way it was constructed.

The only skilled workers available in the area at the time were boatbuilders, so this is who Van Horne commissioned to construct the buildings. The result is that the truss architecture in the barn is very unusual and if you know what to look for, you will see dramatic similarities between the truss structure of the roof and the construction of a large turn of the century ship. The boatbuilders knew little of building construction, so they relied on their knowledge of boatbuilding to frame up the barn.

Here are a couple of pictures….they don't do it justice, but it's unusual to look at and impressive to see in person. Certainly not something you'll find in your local subdivision. :)





Quite neat! Thanks for sharing. When you think about it, what is a barn but a boat turned upside down? Ok, well there are some differences, but it's probably what these guys were saying to each other.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The boathouse, wooden wheels and giant grinding wheels

This past weekend, I was giving my nephew a tour of the old boathouse at my parents' cottage. It occurred to me that it was interesting to see the very rustic construction techniques used, so I began snapping pictures, thinking I'd discuss them here a little bit.

In the process, I stumbled across a few things I hadn't seen in years and a few that I never noticed before.

Here are a couple of pictures of the inside construction, didn't think to show the outside, which is rather dilapidated now…and may well collapse one of these winters.







We're not sure when this building was built, but a rough estimate would be pre-WWII.

The boathouse sits out on stone and wooden cribs over the water. Boats were pulled in and out through the doors in the first picture and used this roller.



As a kid, I remember trying to use an old grinding wheel to sharpen a hatchet, so I went looking for it as well and found not only the hand cranked wheel, but another that has a pulley system attached to it.





These may well make their way back home to my shop if I can work out a way to actually use them….I certainly don't need more big heavy 'stuff' to fill space my workshop.

To my great delight, I stumbled across a pair of old wooden wheels and an old toolbox as well that I had never noticed before. These might migrate back to my workshop as decoration on the walls someday. The system of building up the wheels is pretty intricate and clever. I may well spend some time investigating these in more depth.











The toolbox itself seems to be a very utilitarian box, but it has undergone quite a bit of wear and tear. Not the least of which probably came from the mice and squirrels that have used it as a their own person cottage/outhouse.





Hope you enjoyed these…..if anyone knows more about the wheels, I'd be really interested to know the historical details of this type of wheel. Same for the grinding wheels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,391 Posts
The boathouse, wooden wheels and giant grinding wheels

This past weekend, I was giving my nephew a tour of the old boathouse at my parents' cottage. It occurred to me that it was interesting to see the very rustic construction techniques used, so I began snapping pictures, thinking I'd discuss them here a little bit.

In the process, I stumbled across a few things I hadn't seen in years and a few that I never noticed before.

Here are a couple of pictures of the inside construction, didn't think to show the outside, which is rather dilapidated now…and may well collapse one of these winters.







We're not sure when this building was built, but a rough estimate would be pre-WWII.

The boathouse sits out on stone and wooden cribs over the water. Boats were pulled in and out through the doors in the first picture and used this roller.



As a kid, I remember trying to use an old grinding wheel to sharpen a hatchet, so I went looking for it as well and found not only the hand cranked wheel, but another that has a pulley system attached to it.





These may well make their way back home to my shop if I can work out a way to actually use them….I certainly don't need more big heavy 'stuff' to fill space my workshop.

To my great delight, I stumbled across a pair of old wooden wheels and an old toolbox as well that I had never noticed before. These might migrate back to my workshop as decoration on the walls someday. The system of building up the wheels is pretty intricate and clever. I may well spend some time investigating these in more depth.











The toolbox itself seems to be a very utilitarian box, but it has undergone quite a bit of wear and tear. Not the least of which probably came from the mice and squirrels that have used it as a their own person cottage/outhouse.





Hope you enjoyed these…..if anyone knows more about the wheels, I'd be really interested to know the historical details of this type of wheel. Same for the grinding wheels.
Nice olde stuff! Were the whells possibly used as part of a system to lift small boats out of the water?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
776 Posts
The boathouse, wooden wheels and giant grinding wheels

This past weekend, I was giving my nephew a tour of the old boathouse at my parents' cottage. It occurred to me that it was interesting to see the very rustic construction techniques used, so I began snapping pictures, thinking I'd discuss them here a little bit.

In the process, I stumbled across a few things I hadn't seen in years and a few that I never noticed before.

Here are a couple of pictures of the inside construction, didn't think to show the outside, which is rather dilapidated now…and may well collapse one of these winters.







We're not sure when this building was built, but a rough estimate would be pre-WWII.

The boathouse sits out on stone and wooden cribs over the water. Boats were pulled in and out through the doors in the first picture and used this roller.



As a kid, I remember trying to use an old grinding wheel to sharpen a hatchet, so I went looking for it as well and found not only the hand cranked wheel, but another that has a pulley system attached to it.





These may well make their way back home to my shop if I can work out a way to actually use them….I certainly don't need more big heavy 'stuff' to fill space my workshop.

To my great delight, I stumbled across a pair of old wooden wheels and an old toolbox as well that I had never noticed before. These might migrate back to my workshop as decoration on the walls someday. The system of building up the wheels is pretty intricate and clever. I may well spend some time investigating these in more depth.











The toolbox itself seems to be a very utilitarian box, but it has undergone quite a bit of wear and tear. Not the least of which probably came from the mice and squirrels that have used it as a their own person cottage/outhouse.





Hope you enjoyed these…..if anyone knows more about the wheels, I'd be really interested to know the historical details of this type of wheel. Same for the grinding wheels.
Be careful with the grinding wheels as they may be cracked and explode if you go to use them so I wouldn't I would throw them out or decoration only !!!!!! BTW nice pictures Thanks for posting :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,167 Posts
The boathouse, wooden wheels and giant grinding wheels

This past weekend, I was giving my nephew a tour of the old boathouse at my parents' cottage. It occurred to me that it was interesting to see the very rustic construction techniques used, so I began snapping pictures, thinking I'd discuss them here a little bit.

In the process, I stumbled across a few things I hadn't seen in years and a few that I never noticed before.

Here are a couple of pictures of the inside construction, didn't think to show the outside, which is rather dilapidated now…and may well collapse one of these winters.







We're not sure when this building was built, but a rough estimate would be pre-WWII.

The boathouse sits out on stone and wooden cribs over the water. Boats were pulled in and out through the doors in the first picture and used this roller.



As a kid, I remember trying to use an old grinding wheel to sharpen a hatchet, so I went looking for it as well and found not only the hand cranked wheel, but another that has a pulley system attached to it.





These may well make their way back home to my shop if I can work out a way to actually use them….I certainly don't need more big heavy 'stuff' to fill space my workshop.

To my great delight, I stumbled across a pair of old wooden wheels and an old toolbox as well that I had never noticed before. These might migrate back to my workshop as decoration on the walls someday. The system of building up the wheels is pretty intricate and clever. I may well spend some time investigating these in more depth.











The toolbox itself seems to be a very utilitarian box, but it has undergone quite a bit of wear and tear. Not the least of which probably came from the mice and squirrels that have used it as a their own person cottage/outhouse.





Hope you enjoyed these…..if anyone knows more about the wheels, I'd be really interested to know the historical details of this type of wheel. Same for the grinding wheels.
I love looking at the old wood and tools, what a great find. You should be able to use the hand crank stone as you control the speed. The other one could be used if you run it slow with out much trouble. They where not made for the high speed motors of today.

Thanks for sharing with us.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top