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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Design Sketchup

Hello jocks and jockettes… it has been awhile since my last project, still I've been keeping busy. This is the first entry in a new series on the Arched Bed. If you've seen the copper patina gates you know where I got the idea, or as my brother said, "you're turning your gate into a bed."



The backstory is I had built a bed a couple years ago but since that time we got a Sleep Number bed. Well the new mattresses are each 10" tall so the old bed is like sleeping on stilts. What a great excuse to build a new bed, huh? Well I wanted to make a kind of a platform bed with curved corners on the footboard to minimize the chance and severity of collisions with my shins. I also wanted to try to match my nightsands, experiement further with bending wood, and incorporate the copper patina panel. I also wanted to learn more about Sketchup. The bed is made out of maple with a jatoba toprail. At least it will have a jatoba toprail when I can find a piece. The side rails and footboard are 1" x 8". The corners of the footrail are bent around a 2 1/2" radius. So how do you bend 1" thick maple around a 2 1/2" radius? See hint below.





If anyone wants a copy of the sketchup file please let me know. Next entry I'll go into some of the geometry and caculations of the chord, rise, radius, and arch length using a spreadsheet I downloaded from a fellow woodworker and the Sketchup program.

A note of thanks to the hosts of this site, all the folks who take the time to submit blog entries and provide comments and helpful advice, and to all the people who stop by for a look. I get so much out of your contributions this is my way of paying you back and keeping the good vibes going.



 

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Design Sketchup

Hello jocks and jockettes… it has been awhile since my last project, still I've been keeping busy. This is the first entry in a new series on the Arched Bed. If you've seen the copper patina gates you know where I got the idea, or as my brother said, "you're turning your gate into a bed."



The backstory is I had built a bed a couple years ago but since that time we got a Sleep Number bed. Well the new mattresses are each 10" tall so the old bed is like sleeping on stilts. What a great excuse to build a new bed, huh? Well I wanted to make a kind of a platform bed with curved corners on the footboard to minimize the chance and severity of collisions with my shins. I also wanted to try to match my nightsands, experiement further with bending wood, and incorporate the copper patina panel. I also wanted to learn more about Sketchup. The bed is made out of maple with a jatoba toprail. At least it will have a jatoba toprail when I can find a piece. The side rails and footboard are 1" x 8". The corners of the footrail are bent around a 2 1/2" radius. So how do you bend 1" thick maple around a 2 1/2" radius? See hint below.





If anyone wants a copy of the sketchup file please let me know. Next entry I'll go into some of the geometry and caculations of the chord, rise, radius, and arch length using a spreadsheet I downloaded from a fellow woodworker and the Sketchup program.

A note of thanks to the hosts of this site, all the folks who take the time to submit blog entries and provide comments and helpful advice, and to all the people who stop by for a look. I get so much out of your contributions this is my way of paying you back and keeping the good vibes going.



Great sketchup work. Very detail. Like the design of the bed also. Did you draw the mattress or is that an item in sketchup? I'm new to using sketchup,
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Design Sketchup

Hello jocks and jockettes… it has been awhile since my last project, still I've been keeping busy. This is the first entry in a new series on the Arched Bed. If you've seen the copper patina gates you know where I got the idea, or as my brother said, "you're turning your gate into a bed."



The backstory is I had built a bed a couple years ago but since that time we got a Sleep Number bed. Well the new mattresses are each 10" tall so the old bed is like sleeping on stilts. What a great excuse to build a new bed, huh? Well I wanted to make a kind of a platform bed with curved corners on the footboard to minimize the chance and severity of collisions with my shins. I also wanted to try to match my nightsands, experiement further with bending wood, and incorporate the copper patina panel. I also wanted to learn more about Sketchup. The bed is made out of maple with a jatoba toprail. At least it will have a jatoba toprail when I can find a piece. The side rails and footboard are 1" x 8". The corners of the footrail are bent around a 2 1/2" radius. So how do you bend 1" thick maple around a 2 1/2" radius? See hint below.





If anyone wants a copy of the sketchup file please let me know. Next entry I'll go into some of the geometry and caculations of the chord, rise, radius, and arch length using a spreadsheet I downloaded from a fellow woodworker and the Sketchup program.

A note of thanks to the hosts of this site, all the folks who take the time to submit blog entries and provide comments and helpful advice, and to all the people who stop by for a look. I get so much out of your contributions this is my way of paying you back and keeping the good vibes going.



The mattresses are just rectangles with round corners that are pulled to the 10" height. The pattern on the mattresses is a carpet(?) texture from the materials library. You can probably find a closer match somewhere like the 3D warehouse. The patina panel is from an actual photo I pulled in to the Materials library using the Paintbucket tool. Google/Sketchup has a bunch of great how-to videos. Also search 'Sketchup for Woodworkers'.
 
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Design Sketchup

Hello jocks and jockettes… it has been awhile since my last project, still I've been keeping busy. This is the first entry in a new series on the Arched Bed. If you've seen the copper patina gates you know where I got the idea, or as my brother said, "you're turning your gate into a bed."



The backstory is I had built a bed a couple years ago but since that time we got a Sleep Number bed. Well the new mattresses are each 10" tall so the old bed is like sleeping on stilts. What a great excuse to build a new bed, huh? Well I wanted to make a kind of a platform bed with curved corners on the footboard to minimize the chance and severity of collisions with my shins. I also wanted to try to match my nightsands, experiement further with bending wood, and incorporate the copper patina panel. I also wanted to learn more about Sketchup. The bed is made out of maple with a jatoba toprail. At least it will have a jatoba toprail when I can find a piece. The side rails and footboard are 1" x 8". The corners of the footrail are bent around a 2 1/2" radius. So how do you bend 1" thick maple around a 2 1/2" radius? See hint below.





If anyone wants a copy of the sketchup file please let me know. Next entry I'll go into some of the geometry and caculations of the chord, rise, radius, and arch length using a spreadsheet I downloaded from a fellow woodworker and the Sketchup program.

A note of thanks to the hosts of this site, all the folks who take the time to submit blog entries and provide comments and helpful advice, and to all the people who stop by for a look. I get so much out of your contributions this is my way of paying you back and keeping the good vibes going.



Nice design!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Strike a Chord

I have found that two dimensions are especially helpful in designing arches; the radius of the arch and the length of the boards that make up the arch. If you do a search on 'Woodworking Formulas' with the added keywords Spreadsheets, Arches, and such, you will hit on numerous sites that either have formulas like the one below, or java script calculators on their webpage, or even spreadsheets free to download. One of the best I've found was written by Paul Huntington, an architectural woodworker from Denver. His spreadsheet is very comprehensive and includes calculations for arcs, ring segmens, stairs, helix stairs, springback calculations for bent laminations, dualslope, crown calculations, bigarcs, ellipses, and proportions. Whew! That's a lot of math. Here's a link to the Woodweb.com page where you can download the file.

To calculate the radius or length of an arc you only need two dimensions, the chord and the rise. The chord is any straight line that connects two points on the circumference except the diameter which is a special chord. (if you know the diameter you do not need to calculate the radius). The rise is the perpendicular distance from the middle of the chord to the circumference. The second diagram shows the formula for calculating the radius. You can also use the Dimension Tool in Sketchup to calculate the radius. On this project I used both the spreadsheet and Sketchup to confirm the calculation. The OD radius of the top rail is about 120". Given a 3 1/2" width at the apex, the ID (inner diameter) radius is 116 1/2". This means the ID radius of the cap rail is also 120" and the OD radius of the lower inside rail is 116 1/2". Maybe I should just make the top rail and use that as a form for the cap and inner rails?

Notice that the 84" width of the cap rail in the Sketchup picture is not the actual length of the wood used to make the rail. That length, or the 'Arc Length' is closer to 86". Just download the spreadsheet, it will make more sense than I do. Also check out Paul's discussion on the Woodweb site.




 

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Strike a Chord

I have found that two dimensions are especially helpful in designing arches; the radius of the arch and the length of the boards that make up the arch. If you do a search on 'Woodworking Formulas' with the added keywords Spreadsheets, Arches, and such, you will hit on numerous sites that either have formulas like the one below, or java script calculators on their webpage, or even spreadsheets free to download. One of the best I've found was written by Paul Huntington, an architectural woodworker from Denver. His spreadsheet is very comprehensive and includes calculations for arcs, ring segmens, stairs, helix stairs, springback calculations for bent laminations, dualslope, crown calculations, bigarcs, ellipses, and proportions. Whew! That's a lot of math. Here's a link to the Woodweb.com page where you can download the file.

To calculate the radius or length of an arc you only need two dimensions, the chord and the rise. The chord is any straight line that connects two points on the circumference except the diameter which is a special chord. (if you know the diameter you do not need to calculate the radius). The rise is the perpendicular distance from the middle of the chord to the circumference. The second diagram shows the formula for calculating the radius. You can also use the Dimension Tool in Sketchup to calculate the radius. On this project I used both the spreadsheet and Sketchup to confirm the calculation. The OD radius of the top rail is about 120". Given a 3 1/2" width at the apex, the ID (inner diameter) radius is 116 1/2". This means the ID radius of the cap rail is also 120" and the OD radius of the lower inside rail is 116 1/2". Maybe I should just make the top rail and use that as a form for the cap and inner rails?

Notice that the 84" width of the cap rail in the Sketchup picture is not the actual length of the wood used to make the rail. That length, or the 'Arc Length' is closer to 86". Just download the spreadsheet, it will make more sense than I do. Also check out Paul's discussion on the Woodweb site.




Good info here Tim ! Thanks for posting this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Strike a Chord

I have found that two dimensions are especially helpful in designing arches; the radius of the arch and the length of the boards that make up the arch. If you do a search on 'Woodworking Formulas' with the added keywords Spreadsheets, Arches, and such, you will hit on numerous sites that either have formulas like the one below, or java script calculators on their webpage, or even spreadsheets free to download. One of the best I've found was written by Paul Huntington, an architectural woodworker from Denver. His spreadsheet is very comprehensive and includes calculations for arcs, ring segmens, stairs, helix stairs, springback calculations for bent laminations, dualslope, crown calculations, bigarcs, ellipses, and proportions. Whew! That's a lot of math. Here's a link to the Woodweb.com page where you can download the file.

To calculate the radius or length of an arc you only need two dimensions, the chord and the rise. The chord is any straight line that connects two points on the circumference except the diameter which is a special chord. (if you know the diameter you do not need to calculate the radius). The rise is the perpendicular distance from the middle of the chord to the circumference. The second diagram shows the formula for calculating the radius. You can also use the Dimension Tool in Sketchup to calculate the radius. On this project I used both the spreadsheet and Sketchup to confirm the calculation. The OD radius of the top rail is about 120". Given a 3 1/2" width at the apex, the ID (inner diameter) radius is 116 1/2". This means the ID radius of the cap rail is also 120" and the OD radius of the lower inside rail is 116 1/2". Maybe I should just make the top rail and use that as a form for the cap and inner rails?

Notice that the 84" width of the cap rail in the Sketchup picture is not the actual length of the wood used to make the rail. That length, or the 'Arc Length' is closer to 86". Just download the spreadsheet, it will make more sense than I do. Also check out Paul's discussion on the Woodweb site.




Thanks Bra… hope all is well in San Jose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Bending 1" Thick Maple

Curving or wrapping might be better terms. Once again Sketchup is a big help in this process. The plan calls for rounded corners on the footboard so yours truly doesn't bang his shins on them, or when he does it won't be a sharp corner. This is also another good example of the versatility and accuracy of the Mortise Pal jig. The Dimension tool in the Sketchup model measured the outside of the two staves 1 7/8" in order to achieve a 2 1/2" inside radius with 1" thick stock. The other critical dimension is the distance from the outside of the long rail to the inside of the side rail, 1 9/16". With this dimension you can calculate the outside length of the long bottom rail to produce a given inside bed width so the mattress fits. In this case I'm fitting a California King, 72" x 84", so I'm making the inside width 72 1/2".



The other critical design consideration is how to attach the side rails to the headboard and footboard. For this project I'm using countertop connectors and will install metal pins with metal receiving sleeves above and below the connector to keep the rails in alignment. The side rail will also have a short piece that sits on the footboard slat to hold it in place during assembly.



In this picture you can see the shims I cut to set the mortise jig on an angle so the mortises are perpendicular to the beveled sides. Believe me it produced a very tight and accurate fit. The second picture shows how I cut the mortises in the long footrail. And further below you can see some shots of the footboard. You can click on my Homepage/Reviews to see my review of the Mortise Pal and links to their website.

And next up on The New California Workshop I'll show the templates and glue up of the three arches.







 

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Bending 1" Thick Maple

Curving or wrapping might be better terms. Once again Sketchup is a big help in this process. The plan calls for rounded corners on the footboard so yours truly doesn't bang his shins on them, or when he does it won't be a sharp corner. This is also another good example of the versatility and accuracy of the Mortise Pal jig. The Dimension tool in the Sketchup model measured the outside of the two staves 1 7/8" in order to achieve a 2 1/2" inside radius with 1" thick stock. The other critical dimension is the distance from the outside of the long rail to the inside of the side rail, 1 9/16". With this dimension you can calculate the outside length of the long bottom rail to produce a given inside bed width so the mattress fits. In this case I'm fitting a California King, 72" x 84", so I'm making the inside width 72 1/2".



The other critical design consideration is how to attach the side rails to the headboard and footboard. For this project I'm using countertop connectors and will install metal pins with metal receiving sleeves above and below the connector to keep the rails in alignment. The side rail will also have a short piece that sits on the footboard slat to hold it in place during assembly.



In this picture you can see the shims I cut to set the mortise jig on an angle so the mortises are perpendicular to the beveled sides. Believe me it produced a very tight and accurate fit. The second picture shows how I cut the mortises in the long footrail. And further below you can see some shots of the footboard. You can click on my Homepage/Reviews to see my review of the Mortise Pal and links to their website.

And next up on The New California Workshop I'll show the templates and glue up of the three arches.







really nice crisp work
 

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Bending 1" Thick Maple

Curving or wrapping might be better terms. Once again Sketchup is a big help in this process. The plan calls for rounded corners on the footboard so yours truly doesn't bang his shins on them, or when he does it won't be a sharp corner. This is also another good example of the versatility and accuracy of the Mortise Pal jig. The Dimension tool in the Sketchup model measured the outside of the two staves 1 7/8" in order to achieve a 2 1/2" inside radius with 1" thick stock. The other critical dimension is the distance from the outside of the long rail to the inside of the side rail, 1 9/16". With this dimension you can calculate the outside length of the long bottom rail to produce a given inside bed width so the mattress fits. In this case I'm fitting a California King, 72" x 84", so I'm making the inside width 72 1/2".



The other critical design consideration is how to attach the side rails to the headboard and footboard. For this project I'm using countertop connectors and will install metal pins with metal receiving sleeves above and below the connector to keep the rails in alignment. The side rail will also have a short piece that sits on the footboard slat to hold it in place during assembly.



In this picture you can see the shims I cut to set the mortise jig on an angle so the mortises are perpendicular to the beveled sides. Believe me it produced a very tight and accurate fit. The second picture shows how I cut the mortises in the long footrail. And further below you can see some shots of the footboard. You can click on my Homepage/Reviews to see my review of the Mortise Pal and links to their website.

And next up on The New California Workshop I'll show the templates and glue up of the three arches.







I have a bed project in my future so I'm looking around here for ideas. I really like your design and I commend you on your detail work in SketchUp. I'm new to using SketchUp but seem to be catching on to the idea quickly enough, that is to say I can do the basics. I'll be watching your blog as I'm really interested to see the finished bed! Nice job so far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Bending 1" Thick Maple

Curving or wrapping might be better terms. Once again Sketchup is a big help in this process. The plan calls for rounded corners on the footboard so yours truly doesn't bang his shins on them, or when he does it won't be a sharp corner. This is also another good example of the versatility and accuracy of the Mortise Pal jig. The Dimension tool in the Sketchup model measured the outside of the two staves 1 7/8" in order to achieve a 2 1/2" inside radius with 1" thick stock. The other critical dimension is the distance from the outside of the long rail to the inside of the side rail, 1 9/16". With this dimension you can calculate the outside length of the long bottom rail to produce a given inside bed width so the mattress fits. In this case I'm fitting a California King, 72" x 84", so I'm making the inside width 72 1/2".



The other critical design consideration is how to attach the side rails to the headboard and footboard. For this project I'm using countertop connectors and will install metal pins with metal receiving sleeves above and below the connector to keep the rails in alignment. The side rail will also have a short piece that sits on the footboard slat to hold it in place during assembly.



In this picture you can see the shims I cut to set the mortise jig on an angle so the mortises are perpendicular to the beveled sides. Believe me it produced a very tight and accurate fit. The second picture shows how I cut the mortises in the long footrail. And further below you can see some shots of the footboard. You can click on my Homepage/Reviews to see my review of the Mortise Pal and links to their website.

And next up on The New California Workshop I'll show the templates and glue up of the three arches.







Thanks Dan.

captkerk… thanks. Be sure to check out the Sketchup for Woodworkers page. Just Google 'Sketchup for Woodworkers'. They also have a bunch of good videos on the Sketchup Tutorial page and there are a ton of them on YouTube. When I get breaks I've been watching them on my iPhone. Pretty cool. You can also search on specific topics like 'Sketchup/Layers/Video' or 'Sketchup/Inferencing'. Let me kinow if you want a copy of this model.
 

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Bending 1" Thick Maple

Curving or wrapping might be better terms. Once again Sketchup is a big help in this process. The plan calls for rounded corners on the footboard so yours truly doesn't bang his shins on them, or when he does it won't be a sharp corner. This is also another good example of the versatility and accuracy of the Mortise Pal jig. The Dimension tool in the Sketchup model measured the outside of the two staves 1 7/8" in order to achieve a 2 1/2" inside radius with 1" thick stock. The other critical dimension is the distance from the outside of the long rail to the inside of the side rail, 1 9/16". With this dimension you can calculate the outside length of the long bottom rail to produce a given inside bed width so the mattress fits. In this case I'm fitting a California King, 72" x 84", so I'm making the inside width 72 1/2".



The other critical design consideration is how to attach the side rails to the headboard and footboard. For this project I'm using countertop connectors and will install metal pins with metal receiving sleeves above and below the connector to keep the rails in alignment. The side rail will also have a short piece that sits on the footboard slat to hold it in place during assembly.



In this picture you can see the shims I cut to set the mortise jig on an angle so the mortises are perpendicular to the beveled sides. Believe me it produced a very tight and accurate fit. The second picture shows how I cut the mortises in the long footrail. And further below you can see some shots of the footboard. You can click on my Homepage/Reviews to see my review of the Mortise Pal and links to their website.

And next up on The New California Workshop I'll show the templates and glue up of the three arches.







Thanks for the tips. I'll be sure to check out some of the tutorials
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Temple of Templates

Yeah well you've got to name it something. There are three arches in this project. I figured I could use the middle arch as a form for both the top (cap) arch and the bottom or inside arch. The plan was to make a template of the middle arch and matching bending forms for that part using a jigsaw for the rough cut and a flush trim bit to make the plywood uniform. So back to the second entry in this series. Calculating by both Sketchup and the Chord/Rise equation gave an outside radius (the top of the middle arch) of about 120". Since the headboard posts are 3 1/2" wide I wanted to make the arches match this width so the inside radius is 116 1/2". This is a lesson I learned from another Lumberjock jlsmith5963 regarding segmented arches. There are a number of ways to cut an arch's radius, but I still prefer to use a router and swing arm.

I lined up my workbench perpendicular to the assembly table and used one of the large holes as a pivot. I scrounged around and found a drain pipe and shimmed it with duct tape for a better fit. I used a 1/4" diameter router bit so the center of the holes were placed 3 1/2" apart plus and minus 1/8". The outside radius was cut with the inside or bottom of the bit while the inside radius was cut with the outside or top of the bit (relative to the pivot). Whew… to technical. The end result of all the cutting would produce three pieces so I screwed them all down to a a scrap sheet of mdf making sure the screws would not be in the way of the cutter. After cutting the top arch I repositioned the pivot in the hole to cut the inside arch.

After a little light sanding the pattern was smooth and it was an easy task to mark the curves in the plywood, rough cut the line, and smooth it to a perfect match with the flush trim bit. Next up on the New California Workshop, the first lamination is cut and glued.







 

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Temple of Templates

Yeah well you've got to name it something. There are three arches in this project. I figured I could use the middle arch as a form for both the top (cap) arch and the bottom or inside arch. The plan was to make a template of the middle arch and matching bending forms for that part using a jigsaw for the rough cut and a flush trim bit to make the plywood uniform. So back to the second entry in this series. Calculating by both Sketchup and the Chord/Rise equation gave an outside radius (the top of the middle arch) of about 120". Since the headboard posts are 3 1/2" wide I wanted to make the arches match this width so the inside radius is 116 1/2". This is a lesson I learned from another Lumberjock jlsmith5963 regarding segmented arches. There are a number of ways to cut an arch's radius, but I still prefer to use a router and swing arm.

I lined up my workbench perpendicular to the assembly table and used one of the large holes as a pivot. I scrounged around and found a drain pipe and shimmed it with duct tape for a better fit. I used a 1/4" diameter router bit so the center of the holes were placed 3 1/2" apart plus and minus 1/8". The outside radius was cut with the inside or bottom of the bit while the inside radius was cut with the outside or top of the bit (relative to the pivot). Whew… to technical. The end result of all the cutting would produce three pieces so I screwed them all down to a a scrap sheet of mdf making sure the screws would not be in the way of the cutter. After cutting the top arch I repositioned the pivot in the hole to cut the inside arch.

After a little light sanding the pattern was smooth and it was an easy task to mark the curves in the plywood, rough cut the line, and smooth it to a perfect match with the flush trim bit. Next up on the New California Workshop, the first lamination is cut and glued.







It is always fun to push the limits of the shop with production jigs and fixtures. It feels like you are doing real manly woodworking.
 

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Temple of Templates

Yeah well you've got to name it something. There are three arches in this project. I figured I could use the middle arch as a form for both the top (cap) arch and the bottom or inside arch. The plan was to make a template of the middle arch and matching bending forms for that part using a jigsaw for the rough cut and a flush trim bit to make the plywood uniform. So back to the second entry in this series. Calculating by both Sketchup and the Chord/Rise equation gave an outside radius (the top of the middle arch) of about 120". Since the headboard posts are 3 1/2" wide I wanted to make the arches match this width so the inside radius is 116 1/2". This is a lesson I learned from another Lumberjock jlsmith5963 regarding segmented arches. There are a number of ways to cut an arch's radius, but I still prefer to use a router and swing arm.

I lined up my workbench perpendicular to the assembly table and used one of the large holes as a pivot. I scrounged around and found a drain pipe and shimmed it with duct tape for a better fit. I used a 1/4" diameter router bit so the center of the holes were placed 3 1/2" apart plus and minus 1/8". The outside radius was cut with the inside or bottom of the bit while the inside radius was cut with the outside or top of the bit (relative to the pivot). Whew… to technical. The end result of all the cutting would produce three pieces so I screwed them all down to a a scrap sheet of mdf making sure the screws would not be in the way of the cutter. After cutting the top arch I repositioned the pivot in the hole to cut the inside arch.

After a little light sanding the pattern was smooth and it was an easy task to mark the curves in the plywood, rough cut the line, and smooth it to a perfect match with the flush trim bit. Next up on the New California Workshop, the first lamination is cut and glued.







The only arches I can think about in my small shop are the aching kind on my feet. You did very well on this challenging part of your project. I hope you will post it when finished.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Learning Curve

So after building the giant forms I'm finally ready for the first glue lamination. Since this arch section is made out of 8/4 maple I decided to resaw on the tablesaw. I used a thin kerf blade and set a Grip-Tite about 1/4" opposite the fence as a stop. I've turned the saw 180 degrees in the shop so I can keep the jointer out and have better (central) access to the dust collector. So far it is working great. As you can see from the pictures the form was large and the arch came out pretty good for a first attempt. And, once again, you can't have to many clamps.







 

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Learning Curve

So after building the giant forms I'm finally ready for the first glue lamination. Since this arch section is made out of 8/4 maple I decided to resaw on the tablesaw. I used a thin kerf blade and set a Grip-Tite about 1/4" opposite the fence as a stop. I've turned the saw 180 degrees in the shop so I can keep the jointer out and have better (central) access to the dust collector. So far it is working great. As you can see from the pictures the form was large and the arch came out pretty good for a first attempt. And, once again, you can't have to many clamps.







The arch came out great. It really isn't easy to work with such big pieces, but you have organized it really well. I would also like to compliment you on a very orderly and well-equipped shop.
 

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Learning Curve

So after building the giant forms I'm finally ready for the first glue lamination. Since this arch section is made out of 8/4 maple I decided to resaw on the tablesaw. I used a thin kerf blade and set a Grip-Tite about 1/4" opposite the fence as a stop. I've turned the saw 180 degrees in the shop so I can keep the jointer out and have better (central) access to the dust collector. So far it is working great. As you can see from the pictures the form was large and the arch came out pretty good for a first attempt. And, once again, you can't have to many clamps.







Looking great! I will stay tuned to your blogs…
 

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Learning Curve

So after building the giant forms I'm finally ready for the first glue lamination. Since this arch section is made out of 8/4 maple I decided to resaw on the tablesaw. I used a thin kerf blade and set a Grip-Tite about 1/4" opposite the fence as a stop. I've turned the saw 180 degrees in the shop so I can keep the jointer out and have better (central) access to the dust collector. So far it is working great. As you can see from the pictures the form was large and the arch came out pretty good for a first attempt. And, once again, you can't have to many clamps.







This sure is coming along nicely !I'm glad your posting it step by step I can't wait to see it when your done.

I like your roller stand were did you get it?

Thanks for posting this!
 

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Learning Curve

So after building the giant forms I'm finally ready for the first glue lamination. Since this arch section is made out of 8/4 maple I decided to resaw on the tablesaw. I used a thin kerf blade and set a Grip-Tite about 1/4" opposite the fence as a stop. I've turned the saw 180 degrees in the shop so I can keep the jointer out and have better (central) access to the dust collector. So far it is working great. As you can see from the pictures the form was large and the arch came out pretty good for a first attempt. And, once again, you can't have to many clamps.







Looks great! Quick technique question: Did you have much in the way of saw marks on the strips after cutting them down on the table saw? If so, did they create an issue when gluing up the lamination? Or did you sand or joint out the saw marks?

I just tried my hand at bent laminations and since I wasn't sure if the saw marks would be an issue, I made sure to joint and plane each piece. I have another one to do, this time with thinner pieces, so planing won't be an option, but I'm wondering if I will need to sand them down or not.
 
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