LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,677 Posts
I am 75% done refurbishing my Jet 15" planer. Once it becomes fully operational, I will have 2 planers in my 2 car garage: Rigid 4551 13" lunchbox planer and the Jet JWP 15" planer. I see other posts of having 2 table saws, 2 of the same hand planes, 2 of this, 2 of that. Is there a reason to keep both planers? I COULD sell off the Rigid, but I am not in any financial need to sell it off. The Rigid is not taking up real estate so much as it's on a fliptop with my 6" jointer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
496 Posts
It's hard to imagine a situation where you would take the time to setup a lunchbox planner including connecting the dust collector hose, running power to it and moving the cart into a place where you could use it when you have a permanent floor standing unit sitting in your shop that all you have to do is power on.

For me in my shop it's a ordeal to setup my lunchbox planner and tear it down afterwards. I don't have it on a cart so I have to dig it out of storage and clear space on my bench to place it than move the dust collector into a spot the hose will reach and run a extension cord to the planner before I can even start to use it. If I had a floor standing planner I doubt I would ever think about touching the lunchbox thing again unless the floor standing unit was broke.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,677 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
what's funny… I have a Bosch 4100 contractor saw. I am currently trying to talk a guy on craigslist down from $500 to $200 or $250 for a Jet JTAS-10-1 table saw in banged up shape (unknown motor, rusted top, etc). If he drops the price.. I'll have a nice Jet planer and a nice Jet saw, with spare planer and saw. I need a 4car garage, me thinks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,548 Posts
After using the 15 inch once…......you ll answer that question yourself ! Enjoy the journey !

- cabmaker
That's kinda what I'm thinking. Even so, for a very thin cut the lunchbox will do it, and the stationary won't. But I sold my lunch box when I got the stationary, and it certainly hasn't been a handicap. But with the serrated feed roller if you don't cut off enough it will leave tracks on the wood on the stationary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
496 Posts
I would probably keep the Bosch saw just to have a portable option. There have been times when being able to take a table saw out of my shop would be useful or possibly to make quick cuts when the main saw is setup to do something else that I don't want to change.

That's a slick design for a planner cart. I have looked at the flip carts before but I don't have the room right now. I'm hoping for a upgrade to my shop space soon with a floor standing planner to go along with it but right now I am out of space in what I have to work with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,677 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Fred.. that is one thing I noticed when I started my tear down: the serrated feed roller. I thought it was a mistaken part, coming from the Rigid's soft infeed roller setup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
935 Posts
Flip top cart was a new one to me. Well done.

Agreed on the 4-car garage. Requirement for my next home. I have an oversized 3-car now, love it, but still wan more space.

Sell the Rigid. Duplicates are great if they are set up for different uses, not so much with a planer. Keep the Jet, buy yourself some good squares/rulers/other expensive little things that will help you daily.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,066 Posts
I have an 18" Woodmaster planer up in the barn where the sawmill is and a 13" Ridgid in the shop where I build stuff. I usually rough plane with the big one and finish plane with the Ridgid (it seems to cut a bit cleaner but I'm taking a lot shallower passes).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,340 Posts
I was going to suggest what Rob beat me to it.

Run the junky, rough stuff through the Ridgid kinda like skip planing.
That way you save the blades on the Jet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,677 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
ooo… good idea on using 2nd planer as painted / dirty lumber, or sacrificial if a concern of knicking blades.
Ok… I'll keep the Rigid. More than enough thoughts on having 2 planers to justify keeping it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
756 Posts
ooo… good idea on using 2nd planer as painted / dirty lumber, or sacrificial if a concern of knicking blades.
Ok… I ll keep the Rigid. More than enough thoughts on having 2 planers to justify keeping it.

- Holbs
I have a 15" planer but have been watching for a cheap used lunchbox planer specifically for this reason.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,194 Posts
Considering the scope and scale of the work we do in my company, you'd think we'd use a large planer. Not so. A 10" Ryobi benchtop is the go-to tool in the shop. We don't even have the 20" Rockwell anymore since it took up too much real estate for a machine that got used twice a year.

Bigger planers can process wood faster but unless you're doing a lot of planing, the time savings is minimal. The segmented rollers mean you have to take off heavier passes and can't sneak up on that perfect thickness. Big planers also don't handle thin stock well and you can't feed a steam-bent curve into a machine that has anti-kickback fingers.

I'd recommend keeping the little one if you even deal with thin stock, curves or want to make tenon stock.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top