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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Intro

Having a nice sound system has always been a priority on my life since I was a teenager in the 1970's. My tastes in music have changed over the years but I still insist on listening to good quality audio equipment. These days I find myself seldom playing CD's anymore, instead I either stream music from the internet, play music ripped to my laptop via iTunes or listen to my local FM radio station. So my audio equipment has dwindled down to just an integrated amp , a tuner, and speakers.

I've always been fascinated with those old radio consoles from the 1930's and 1940's and decided it would be neat to retrofit one of these old cabinets with my audio equipment. So begins my next project and first posting on Lumberjocks.

I came across this 1940's Philco cabinet on ebay which I bought for $40 which I found the art deco design very appealing to match my 1930's built house…. and most important, my wife agrees
Furniture Table Wood Wood stain Flooring


It has a lift up panel where the original tuner went which is a perfect size for the tuner I wish to use. It also has a pull panel that housed a turntable which would be perfect for housing my integrated amp.
Table Wood Flooring Floor Hardwood


The project begins with repairs to the cabinet's framing…
 

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Intro

Having a nice sound system has always been a priority on my life since I was a teenager in the 1970's. My tastes in music have changed over the years but I still insist on listening to good quality audio equipment. These days I find myself seldom playing CD's anymore, instead I either stream music from the internet, play music ripped to my laptop via iTunes or listen to my local FM radio station. So my audio equipment has dwindled down to just an integrated amp , a tuner, and speakers.

I've always been fascinated with those old radio consoles from the 1930's and 1940's and decided it would be neat to retrofit one of these old cabinets with my audio equipment. So begins my next project and first posting on Lumberjocks.

I came across this 1940's Philco cabinet on ebay which I bought for $40 which I found the art deco design very appealing to match my 1930's built house…. and most important, my wife agrees
Furniture Table Wood Wood stain Flooring


It has a lift up panel where the original tuner went which is a perfect size for the tuner I wish to use. It also has a pull panel that housed a turntable which would be perfect for housing my integrated amp.
Table Wood Flooring Floor Hardwood


The project begins with repairs to the cabinet's framing…
Hey, this looks good! I'll follow along.
 

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Intro

Having a nice sound system has always been a priority on my life since I was a teenager in the 1970's. My tastes in music have changed over the years but I still insist on listening to good quality audio equipment. These days I find myself seldom playing CD's anymore, instead I either stream music from the internet, play music ripped to my laptop via iTunes or listen to my local FM radio station. So my audio equipment has dwindled down to just an integrated amp , a tuner, and speakers.

I've always been fascinated with those old radio consoles from the 1930's and 1940's and decided it would be neat to retrofit one of these old cabinets with my audio equipment. So begins my next project and first posting on Lumberjocks.

I came across this 1940's Philco cabinet on ebay which I bought for $40 which I found the art deco design very appealing to match my 1930's built house…. and most important, my wife agrees
Furniture Table Wood Wood stain Flooring


It has a lift up panel where the original tuner went which is a perfect size for the tuner I wish to use. It also has a pull panel that housed a turntable which would be perfect for housing my integrated amp.
Table Wood Flooring Floor Hardwood


The project begins with repairs to the cabinet's framing…
I'll follow along as well. I have a 1946 Philco cabinet similar to yours. BTW, that was a good buy at $40. Did it have the original knobs on it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Intro

Having a nice sound system has always been a priority on my life since I was a teenager in the 1970's. My tastes in music have changed over the years but I still insist on listening to good quality audio equipment. These days I find myself seldom playing CD's anymore, instead I either stream music from the internet, play music ripped to my laptop via iTunes or listen to my local FM radio station. So my audio equipment has dwindled down to just an integrated amp , a tuner, and speakers.

I've always been fascinated with those old radio consoles from the 1930's and 1940's and decided it would be neat to retrofit one of these old cabinets with my audio equipment. So begins my next project and first posting on Lumberjocks.

I came across this 1940's Philco cabinet on ebay which I bought for $40 which I found the art deco design very appealing to match my 1930's built house…. and most important, my wife agrees
Furniture Table Wood Wood stain Flooring


It has a lift up panel where the original tuner went which is a perfect size for the tuner I wish to use. It also has a pull panel that housed a turntable which would be perfect for housing my integrated amp.
Table Wood Flooring Floor Hardwood


The project begins with repairs to the cabinet's framing…
I ll follow along as well. I have a 1946 Philco cabinet similar to yours. BTW, that was a good buy at $40. Did it have the original knobs on it?

- Don Broussard
Yup, I thought it was a good buy too…. but I had to drive 170 miles (round trip) to get it… it seems most of these old radio cabinets are $150 and up on eBay depending on their condition.

Yes the knobs were there too. It was an AM/SW tuner, and it had the Beam-of-Light turntable that you could record your own records with, that did not work out so well for Philco. As I understood it, they only made the Beam-of-Light turntable for two years and then discontinued them… today you can't get Beam-of-Light parts. I read about a couple of radio guys that made their own parts for this turntable… but you gotta know what your doing.

Here's a link for details of the radio.

I have a 1976 Onkyo TX-4500 receiver that I bought brand new. I have used it regularly over the years (its now my shop radio) and am rather attached to it. I've never had problems with it except for burnt out indicator light bulbs. Well it recently suddenly stopped working with a loud pop. I brought it to my local vintage radio repair shop. The tech was thrilled to see it and marveled over it. He is in process of completely overhauling it at the moment. To cut down the cost of the overhaul I gave him the components from this Philco console…. knobs and all… to which he was appreciative.

I talked with him about this project to get his thoughts because I know there will be some folks that will object to me retrofitting a piece of radio history. He encouraged me to proceed and pointed out that even though these old vacuum tube radios can be made to work again, the chassis are well aged and even with new electronic parts mounted in them, they are prone to problems that only folks versed in vacuum tube electronics can deal with (you can electrocute yourself working on this old stuff if you don't know what your doing). He also commented that they are not fused and susceptible to fire if something shorts out. They also consume a great deal of power. As long as I was doing something nice with the cabinet, he was all for it.
 

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Intro

Having a nice sound system has always been a priority on my life since I was a teenager in the 1970's. My tastes in music have changed over the years but I still insist on listening to good quality audio equipment. These days I find myself seldom playing CD's anymore, instead I either stream music from the internet, play music ripped to my laptop via iTunes or listen to my local FM radio station. So my audio equipment has dwindled down to just an integrated amp , a tuner, and speakers.

I've always been fascinated with those old radio consoles from the 1930's and 1940's and decided it would be neat to retrofit one of these old cabinets with my audio equipment. So begins my next project and first posting on Lumberjocks.

I came across this 1940's Philco cabinet on ebay which I bought for $40 which I found the art deco design very appealing to match my 1930's built house…. and most important, my wife agrees
Furniture Table Wood Wood stain Flooring


It has a lift up panel where the original tuner went which is a perfect size for the tuner I wish to use. It also has a pull panel that housed a turntable which would be perfect for housing my integrated amp.
Table Wood Flooring Floor Hardwood


The project begins with repairs to the cabinet's framing…
This will be interesting to follow along and see how it turns out. Looking forward to it.
 

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Intro

Having a nice sound system has always been a priority on my life since I was a teenager in the 1970's. My tastes in music have changed over the years but I still insist on listening to good quality audio equipment. These days I find myself seldom playing CD's anymore, instead I either stream music from the internet, play music ripped to my laptop via iTunes or listen to my local FM radio station. So my audio equipment has dwindled down to just an integrated amp , a tuner, and speakers.

I've always been fascinated with those old radio consoles from the 1930's and 1940's and decided it would be neat to retrofit one of these old cabinets with my audio equipment. So begins my next project and first posting on Lumberjocks.

I came across this 1940's Philco cabinet on ebay which I bought for $40 which I found the art deco design very appealing to match my 1930's built house…. and most important, my wife agrees
Furniture Table Wood Wood stain Flooring


It has a lift up panel where the original tuner went which is a perfect size for the tuner I wish to use. It also has a pull panel that housed a turntable which would be perfect for housing my integrated amp.
Table Wood Flooring Floor Hardwood


The project begins with repairs to the cabinet's framing…
Oh, and …

WELCOME to LumberJocks!
 

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Intro

Having a nice sound system has always been a priority on my life since I was a teenager in the 1970's. My tastes in music have changed over the years but I still insist on listening to good quality audio equipment. These days I find myself seldom playing CD's anymore, instead I either stream music from the internet, play music ripped to my laptop via iTunes or listen to my local FM radio station. So my audio equipment has dwindled down to just an integrated amp , a tuner, and speakers.

I've always been fascinated with those old radio consoles from the 1930's and 1940's and decided it would be neat to retrofit one of these old cabinets with my audio equipment. So begins my next project and first posting on Lumberjocks.

I came across this 1940's Philco cabinet on ebay which I bought for $40 which I found the art deco design very appealing to match my 1930's built house…. and most important, my wife agrees
Furniture Table Wood Wood stain Flooring


It has a lift up panel where the original tuner went which is a perfect size for the tuner I wish to use. It also has a pull panel that housed a turntable which would be perfect for housing my integrated amp.
Table Wood Flooring Floor Hardwood


The project begins with repairs to the cabinet's framing…
Looking forward to this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The Components

At the heart of this system will be my 10 year old Marantz PM7200 Integrated Amp. It operates as both a Class AB and a Class A Amp. Class A operates much like the vacuum tube amps of yesteryear.
Font Technology Electronic device Audio equipment Electric blue


It will get mounted, face-Up in the front tilt-out panel.

The tuner is a high-end European brand table radio made by Tangent Audio called the Uno. I chose it primarily for its art deco style glass bezel tuner dial. Also because it is simply controlled. It produces an exceptional sound for a table radio, pulls in the local stations (both AM and FM) nicely, has an auxiliary selection for input from Apple Airplay for streaming music, and a stereo output jack in the back to input into the amp. It will fit very nicely under the console's lid.
Output device Gadget Audio equipment Circle Musical instrument


It has a glass bezel, and the knobs have a very solid quality feel to them when you turn them and sort of match the knobs style of old radios. It also has a tuning light indicator that glows or dims indicating how well your dialed-in which was common on old radios like the famous Zenith Magic-Eye.

You can't buy the Uno anymore as Tangent Audio no longer produces them. C.Crane used to distribute them here in the USA. I found this one on eBay for $80.00. Crosley makes a look-a-like called the Solo. I don't know if its the same thing or a cheap look-a-like.

Mounted in the base of the console will be an 8" sub-woofer.

A pair of stereo speakers will be external to the radio console and will site on shelves on the wall. I plan to rebuild the speaker cabinets to match the style of the radio console.
 

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The Components

At the heart of this system will be my 10 year old Marantz PM7200 Integrated Amp. It operates as both a Class AB and a Class A Amp. Class A operates much like the vacuum tube amps of yesteryear.
Font Technology Electronic device Audio equipment Electric blue


It will get mounted, face-Up in the front tilt-out panel.

The tuner is a high-end European brand table radio made by Tangent Audio called the Uno. I chose it primarily for its art deco style glass bezel tuner dial. Also because it is simply controlled. It produces an exceptional sound for a table radio, pulls in the local stations (both AM and FM) nicely, has an auxiliary selection for input from Apple Airplay for streaming music, and a stereo output jack in the back to input into the amp. It will fit very nicely under the console's lid.
Output device Gadget Audio equipment Circle Musical instrument


It has a glass bezel, and the knobs have a very solid quality feel to them when you turn them and sort of match the knobs style of old radios. It also has a tuning light indicator that glows or dims indicating how well your dialed-in which was common on old radios like the famous Zenith Magic-Eye.

You can't buy the Uno anymore as Tangent Audio no longer produces them. C.Crane used to distribute them here in the USA. I found this one on eBay for $80.00. Crosley makes a look-a-like called the Solo. I don't know if its the same thing or a cheap look-a-like.

Mounted in the base of the console will be an 8" sub-woofer.

A pair of stereo speakers will be external to the radio console and will site on shelves on the wall. I plan to rebuild the speaker cabinets to match the style of the radio console.
Making progress! I used to have a Sansei 9090dB and I miss that amplifier. It was just SO clean. That Uno unit looks pretty sharp. Modern techology with a retro look.
 

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The Components

At the heart of this system will be my 10 year old Marantz PM7200 Integrated Amp. It operates as both a Class AB and a Class A Amp. Class A operates much like the vacuum tube amps of yesteryear.
Font Technology Electronic device Audio equipment Electric blue


It will get mounted, face-Up in the front tilt-out panel.

The tuner is a high-end European brand table radio made by Tangent Audio called the Uno. I chose it primarily for its art deco style glass bezel tuner dial. Also because it is simply controlled. It produces an exceptional sound for a table radio, pulls in the local stations (both AM and FM) nicely, has an auxiliary selection for input from Apple Airplay for streaming music, and a stereo output jack in the back to input into the amp. It will fit very nicely under the console's lid.
Output device Gadget Audio equipment Circle Musical instrument


It has a glass bezel, and the knobs have a very solid quality feel to them when you turn them and sort of match the knobs style of old radios. It also has a tuning light indicator that glows or dims indicating how well your dialed-in which was common on old radios like the famous Zenith Magic-Eye.

You can't buy the Uno anymore as Tangent Audio no longer produces them. C.Crane used to distribute them here in the USA. I found this one on eBay for $80.00. Crosley makes a look-a-like called the Solo. I don't know if its the same thing or a cheap look-a-like.

Mounted in the base of the console will be an 8" sub-woofer.

A pair of stereo speakers will be external to the radio console and will site on shelves on the wall. I plan to rebuild the speaker cabinets to match the style of the radio console.
Double post.
 

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The Components

At the heart of this system will be my 10 year old Marantz PM7200 Integrated Amp. It operates as both a Class AB and a Class A Amp. Class A operates much like the vacuum tube amps of yesteryear.
Font Technology Electronic device Audio equipment Electric blue


It will get mounted, face-Up in the front tilt-out panel.

The tuner is a high-end European brand table radio made by Tangent Audio called the Uno. I chose it primarily for its art deco style glass bezel tuner dial. Also because it is simply controlled. It produces an exceptional sound for a table radio, pulls in the local stations (both AM and FM) nicely, has an auxiliary selection for input from Apple Airplay for streaming music, and a stereo output jack in the back to input into the amp. It will fit very nicely under the console's lid.
Output device Gadget Audio equipment Circle Musical instrument


It has a glass bezel, and the knobs have a very solid quality feel to them when you turn them and sort of match the knobs style of old radios. It also has a tuning light indicator that glows or dims indicating how well your dialed-in which was common on old radios like the famous Zenith Magic-Eye.

You can't buy the Uno anymore as Tangent Audio no longer produces them. C.Crane used to distribute them here in the USA. I found this one on eBay for $80.00. Crosley makes a look-a-like called the Solo. I don't know if its the same thing or a cheap look-a-like.

Mounted in the base of the console will be an 8" sub-woofer.

A pair of stereo speakers will be external to the radio console and will site on shelves on the wall. I plan to rebuild the speaker cabinets to match the style of the radio console.
I have an Advent tuner/amp that I bought in 1972. Have been thru 3 sets of speakers, but the Advent still works great
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The Components

At the heart of this system will be my 10 year old Marantz PM7200 Integrated Amp. It operates as both a Class AB and a Class A Amp. Class A operates much like the vacuum tube amps of yesteryear.
Font Technology Electronic device Audio equipment Electric blue


It will get mounted, face-Up in the front tilt-out panel.

The tuner is a high-end European brand table radio made by Tangent Audio called the Uno. I chose it primarily for its art deco style glass bezel tuner dial. Also because it is simply controlled. It produces an exceptional sound for a table radio, pulls in the local stations (both AM and FM) nicely, has an auxiliary selection for input from Apple Airplay for streaming music, and a stereo output jack in the back to input into the amp. It will fit very nicely under the console's lid.
Output device Gadget Audio equipment Circle Musical instrument


It has a glass bezel, and the knobs have a very solid quality feel to them when you turn them and sort of match the knobs style of old radios. It also has a tuning light indicator that glows or dims indicating how well your dialed-in which was common on old radios like the famous Zenith Magic-Eye.

You can't buy the Uno anymore as Tangent Audio no longer produces them. C.Crane used to distribute them here in the USA. I found this one on eBay for $80.00. Crosley makes a look-a-like called the Solo. I don't know if its the same thing or a cheap look-a-like.

Mounted in the base of the console will be an 8" sub-woofer.

A pair of stereo speakers will be external to the radio console and will site on shelves on the wall. I plan to rebuild the speaker cabinets to match the style of the radio console.
Making progress! I used to have a Sansei 9090dB and I miss that amplifier.
I have an Advent tuner/amp that I bought in 1972. Have been thru 3 sets of speakers, but the Advent still works great
A friend had the very same Sansei… they were popular and good. I remember Advent being pretty darn popular too. The technician repairing my Onkyo said that he thinks the audio components of the 70's were the last of the ones worth repairing. With Audio equipment made after the 70's… when they break, you throw them away and buy new.
 

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The Components

At the heart of this system will be my 10 year old Marantz PM7200 Integrated Amp. It operates as both a Class AB and a Class A Amp. Class A operates much like the vacuum tube amps of yesteryear.
Font Technology Electronic device Audio equipment Electric blue


It will get mounted, face-Up in the front tilt-out panel.

The tuner is a high-end European brand table radio made by Tangent Audio called the Uno. I chose it primarily for its art deco style glass bezel tuner dial. Also because it is simply controlled. It produces an exceptional sound for a table radio, pulls in the local stations (both AM and FM) nicely, has an auxiliary selection for input from Apple Airplay for streaming music, and a stereo output jack in the back to input into the amp. It will fit very nicely under the console's lid.
Output device Gadget Audio equipment Circle Musical instrument


It has a glass bezel, and the knobs have a very solid quality feel to them when you turn them and sort of match the knobs style of old radios. It also has a tuning light indicator that glows or dims indicating how well your dialed-in which was common on old radios like the famous Zenith Magic-Eye.

You can't buy the Uno anymore as Tangent Audio no longer produces them. C.Crane used to distribute them here in the USA. I found this one on eBay for $80.00. Crosley makes a look-a-like called the Solo. I don't know if its the same thing or a cheap look-a-like.

Mounted in the base of the console will be an 8" sub-woofer.

A pair of stereo speakers will be external to the radio console and will site on shelves on the wall. I plan to rebuild the speaker cabinets to match the style of the radio console.
I hear you about the audio of the late 60s and early 70s. I also have the Sansui turntable that I got at the same time.
I also bought a pair of Cerwin Vega speakers that day. They were MASSIVELY heavy! But they lasted me till 1996, when the speaker cones finally gave up the ghost. I've gone thru 2 different sets of Radio Shack speakers since then. Neither has been anywhere near as nice sounding as those Vegas
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Repairs

I began the project this weekend with repairs…. nothing too exciting here. The first problem I addressed was the lower frame which was falling apart. On the back side of the console cabinet there is a screw block holding a rail to the side of the cabinet. A screw was missing and the rail had come loose.

Window Wood Building Fixture Interior design


Check out the huge adjustable double loop AM antenna… going to keep that and use it for the tuner for better AM reception… looking forward to listening to a few baseball games.

All this needed was some glue and a new screw. I glued it up, clamped it in place and installed a new screw…. pretty straight forward.

Next was the top. The veneer was in tough shape and was delaminating here and there.
Wood Table Wood stain Rectangle Hardwood


The top was also separating along a seam of two pieces joined together to form the edge molding.
Table Wood Rectangle Wood stain Floor


Brown Wood Rectangle Wood stain Flooring


To repair this I pried the seam apart enough to get a glue injector in there, and glued and clamped it until dry.
Wood Hardwood Wood stain Table Rectangle


Wood Gas Machine Engineering Metal


Table Furniture Cabinetry Wood Floor


I decided instead of trying to repair the veneer on the top, I would replace it instead. So I used a heat gun and putty knife to remove the old veneer…. it was in such bad shape it simply and easily peeled off. Looks like the substrate is poplar…. took a few swipes off that surface with my block plane to clean it up and flatten it.

Shelf Wood Wheel Shelving Automotive exterior
 

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Repairs

I began the project this weekend with repairs…. nothing too exciting here. The first problem I addressed was the lower frame which was falling apart. On the back side of the console cabinet there is a screw block holding a rail to the side of the cabinet. A screw was missing and the rail had come loose.

Window Wood Building Fixture Interior design


Check out the huge adjustable double loop AM antenna… going to keep that and use it for the tuner for better AM reception… looking forward to listening to a few baseball games.

All this needed was some glue and a new screw. I glued it up, clamped it in place and installed a new screw…. pretty straight forward.

Next was the top. The veneer was in tough shape and was delaminating here and there.
Wood Table Wood stain Rectangle Hardwood


The top was also separating along a seam of two pieces joined together to form the edge molding.
Table Wood Rectangle Wood stain Floor


Brown Wood Rectangle Wood stain Flooring


To repair this I pried the seam apart enough to get a glue injector in there, and glued and clamped it until dry.
Wood Hardwood Wood stain Table Rectangle


Wood Gas Machine Engineering Metal


Table Furniture Cabinetry Wood Floor


I decided instead of trying to repair the veneer on the top, I would replace it instead. So I used a heat gun and putty knife to remove the old veneer…. it was in such bad shape it simply and easily peeled off. Looks like the substrate is poplar…. took a few swipes off that surface with my block plane to clean it up and flatten it.

Shelf Wood Wheel Shelving Automotive exterior
Very cool project. This looks very similar to an RCA that my folks owned and I remember listening to when I was a kid.

Unfortunately, it saw its demise about 12 years ago when my folks had a really bad sewer backup in their basement. The old radio had to be discarded along with a lot of other stuff because of sewage contamination.
What a shame….

Anyway, I highly anticipate seeing your completed restoration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
More Repairs

After gluing and clamping down the top piece to the frame on the outside edges, I found that the inside edges, by where the radio control panel is, on both sides, started to crack, separate and lift.
Wood Wood stain Hardwood Gas Plywood


To repair this, I was concerned that if I pried this area open enough to insert a glue injector, I would do more harm than good. I felt that if I opened up the crack by sawing a kerf, and filled the kerf with thickened epoxy that would act as both a filler and an adhesive, that didn't need clamping, would be a good solution… so that's the path I chose.

First I made a kerf (on both sides of the control panel) with my Japanese pull saw.
Wood Flooring Hardwood Wood stain Art


Then I injected some thickened epoxy in the two kerfs.
Table Wood Desk Fender Automotive exterior


Then I cleaned it up and left it alone to cure.
Wood Cabinetry Wood stain Hardwood Varnish


Wood Motor vehicle Automotive wheel system Automotive exterior Hardwood


Also, after removing the veneer from the top substrate, splits were revealed that needed attention… I used the same method to repair the splits. The epoxy should help to prevent these splits from splitting further as well as filling the void created by the split.
Automotive tire Wood Artifact Tire Bumper


Wood Automotive wheel system Hardwood Automotive exterior Automotive tire


Automotive tire Wood Thigh Hood Bumper


Wood Floor Wood stain Composite material Flooring


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Plywood Flooring


Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Wood Table Wood stain Flooring Hardwood


These epoxy filled splits are no concern visually as I plan to put new mahogany veneer down on the top and to paint the edge molding black.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
New Face

This weekend had me working on replacing the face of the console where the tuner is mounted. The old face came out easily… just had to remove about a dozen screws and give it a few taps to loosen it up. It wasn't glued, but the original lacquer finish held it in place some.

Then I had to come up with a way to mount the new radio. I took the new radio out of its case. It came out pretty easily. Just four screws held it together and another pair of screws secured to a pair or retaining clips. I discovered the radio was essentially two parts… the tuner, and the amp. They were held together by four screws that sort of clamped itself together inside the case.

Audio equipment Electrical wiring Gas Camera lens Circuit component


Now knowing how it assembled together, I came up with a way to mount it to the new face using the four screw mounts.

Rectangle Flooring Floor Tableware Wood


Wood Camera lens Cameras & optics Rectangle Gas


To make the face I began with some scrap ¼" marine plywood I had in the shop and glued a 1/16" thick mahogany veneer to it that was left over from my last project (I need to make myself a veneer press one of these days). This is thinner that the original face, but the marine plywood is better quality and stronger even though its thinner.

Wood Flooring Hardwood Gas Machine


Brown Rectangle Wood Wood stain Flooring


Then I trimmed it to size and cut bevels to match the old face and also made a cutout to mount the new radio.

Wood Rectangle Floor Composite material Gas


The old face was made with a spline to join the front and top together. This was doable because the face was ⅜" thick. I felt my new face was too thin to use a spline so I put my boat building skills to work and epoxied them together utilizing an epoxy fillet.

First I made a clamping mold.
Wheel Wood Flooring Tire Floor


Then I taped the two pieces together with packing tape that acted as both a hinge and a means to temporarily hold the two pieces together.
Wood Flooring Floor Table Automotive design


Wood Rectangle Composite material Automotive exterior Gas


Then I applied thickened epoxy to the seam, folded it in place in the mold, clamped it, then applied the epoxy fillet. Note that I also laid down some packing tape to the mold so that I didn't accidentally epoxy the face to the mold.

Wood Floor Flooring Bumper Gas


After curing for 24 hours it came out pretty decent.

Wheel Tire Road surface Wood Asphalt


Wood Rectangle Asphalt Automotive exterior Composite material


Wood Composite material Gas Flooring Hardwood
 

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New Face

This weekend had me working on replacing the face of the console where the tuner is mounted. The old face came out easily… just had to remove about a dozen screws and give it a few taps to loosen it up. It wasn't glued, but the original lacquer finish held it in place some.

Then I had to come up with a way to mount the new radio. I took the new radio out of its case. It came out pretty easily. Just four screws held it together and another pair of screws secured to a pair or retaining clips. I discovered the radio was essentially two parts… the tuner, and the amp. They were held together by four screws that sort of clamped itself together inside the case.

Audio equipment Electrical wiring Gas Camera lens Circuit component


Now knowing how it assembled together, I came up with a way to mount it to the new face using the four screw mounts.

Rectangle Flooring Floor Tableware Wood


Wood Camera lens Cameras & optics Rectangle Gas


To make the face I began with some scrap ¼" marine plywood I had in the shop and glued a 1/16" thick mahogany veneer to it that was left over from my last project (I need to make myself a veneer press one of these days). This is thinner that the original face, but the marine plywood is better quality and stronger even though its thinner.

Wood Flooring Hardwood Gas Machine


Brown Rectangle Wood Wood stain Flooring


Then I trimmed it to size and cut bevels to match the old face and also made a cutout to mount the new radio.

Wood Rectangle Floor Composite material Gas


The old face was made with a spline to join the front and top together. This was doable because the face was ⅜" thick. I felt my new face was too thin to use a spline so I put my boat building skills to work and epoxied them together utilizing an epoxy fillet.

First I made a clamping mold.
Wheel Wood Flooring Tire Floor


Then I taped the two pieces together with packing tape that acted as both a hinge and a means to temporarily hold the two pieces together.
Wood Flooring Floor Table Automotive design


Wood Rectangle Composite material Automotive exterior Gas


Then I applied thickened epoxy to the seam, folded it in place in the mold, clamped it, then applied the epoxy fillet. Note that I also laid down some packing tape to the mold so that I didn't accidentally epoxy the face to the mold.

Wood Floor Flooring Bumper Gas


After curing for 24 hours it came out pretty decent.

Wheel Tire Road surface Wood Asphalt


Wood Rectangle Asphalt Automotive exterior Composite material


Wood Composite material Gas Flooring Hardwood
That is going to look really sharp when all is said and done. Look forward to seeing the outcome of this project.
 

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New Face

This weekend had me working on replacing the face of the console where the tuner is mounted. The old face came out easily… just had to remove about a dozen screws and give it a few taps to loosen it up. It wasn't glued, but the original lacquer finish held it in place some.

Then I had to come up with a way to mount the new radio. I took the new radio out of its case. It came out pretty easily. Just four screws held it together and another pair of screws secured to a pair or retaining clips. I discovered the radio was essentially two parts… the tuner, and the amp. They were held together by four screws that sort of clamped itself together inside the case.



Now knowing how it assembled together, I came up with a way to mount it to the new face using the four screw mounts.





To make the face I began with some scrap ¼" marine plywood I had in the shop and glued a 1/16" thick mahogany veneer to it that was left over from my last project (I need to make myself a veneer press one of these days). This is thinner that the original face, but the marine plywood is better quality and stronger even though its thinner.





Then I trimmed it to size and cut bevels to match the old face and also made a cutout to mount the new radio.



The old face was made with a spline to join the front and top together. This was doable because the face was ⅜" thick. I felt my new face was too thin to use a spline so I put my boat building skills to work and epoxied them together utilizing an epoxy fillet.

First I made a clamping mold.


Then I taped the two pieces together with packing tape that acted as both a hinge and a means to temporarily hold the two pieces together.




Then I applied thickened epoxy to the seam, folded it in place in the mold, clamped it, then applied the epoxy fillet. Note that I also laid down some packing tape to the mold so that I didn't accidentally epoxy the face to the mold.



After curing for 24 hours it came out pretty decent.





Very nice work, you've got serious skill on display. Thanks for posting!
 

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New Face

This weekend had me working on replacing the face of the console where the tuner is mounted. The old face came out easily… just had to remove about a dozen screws and give it a few taps to loosen it up. It wasn't glued, but the original lacquer finish held it in place some.

Then I had to come up with a way to mount the new radio. I took the new radio out of its case. It came out pretty easily. Just four screws held it together and another pair of screws secured to a pair or retaining clips. I discovered the radio was essentially two parts… the tuner, and the amp. They were held together by four screws that sort of clamped itself together inside the case.

Audio equipment Electrical wiring Gas Camera lens Circuit component


Now knowing how it assembled together, I came up with a way to mount it to the new face using the four screw mounts.

Rectangle Flooring Floor Tableware Wood


Wood Camera lens Cameras & optics Rectangle Gas


To make the face I began with some scrap ¼" marine plywood I had in the shop and glued a 1/16" thick mahogany veneer to it that was left over from my last project (I need to make myself a veneer press one of these days). This is thinner that the original face, but the marine plywood is better quality and stronger even though its thinner.

Wood Flooring Hardwood Gas Machine


Brown Rectangle Wood Wood stain Flooring


Then I trimmed it to size and cut bevels to match the old face and also made a cutout to mount the new radio.

Wood Rectangle Floor Composite material Gas


The old face was made with a spline to join the front and top together. This was doable because the face was ⅜" thick. I felt my new face was too thin to use a spline so I put my boat building skills to work and epoxied them together utilizing an epoxy fillet.

First I made a clamping mold.
Wheel Wood Flooring Tire Floor


Then I taped the two pieces together with packing tape that acted as both a hinge and a means to temporarily hold the two pieces together.
Wood Flooring Floor Table Automotive design


Wood Rectangle Composite material Automotive exterior Gas


Then I applied thickened epoxy to the seam, folded it in place in the mold, clamped it, then applied the epoxy fillet. Note that I also laid down some packing tape to the mold so that I didn't accidentally epoxy the face to the mold.

Wood Floor Flooring Bumper Gas


After curing for 24 hours it came out pretty decent.

Wheel Tire Road surface Wood Asphalt


Wood Rectangle Asphalt Automotive exterior Composite material


Wood Composite material Gas Flooring Hardwood
Great job Pags! I have a table top version I've been wanting to rehab and didn't know where to start and you've given me some ideas. Thanks!
 

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