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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Taking shape

In the first couple of centuries or so A.D, The Germani tribe was dominant in northern Denmark. Following military victories, it was their tradition to hurl war booty into the nearest bog!

Just near Odense, is a massive bog called Vimose containing a considerable quantity of these war booty sacrifices. In the 1860s excavations took place there and the peaty conditions preserved a large number of wooden objects including two wooden planes, probably made by the Romans, now known as Vimose A and B. Vimose A is in remarkable condition and I am currently making a reconstruction, in boxwood, the same material as the original.

See the December 2008 issue of The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association for a paper on this and other planes from the first millennium AD.

The plane measures only about 10" long x 1.5" wide and has a sole that is hollow which indicates that it was used to make handles for spears and lances.

The replica will eventually be placed in a private museum in Yorkshire.

I am grateful to the most helpful south of England woodturner George Foweraker kindly providing the beautiful piece of boxwood when I couldn't locate a suitable piece. Carving is pretty well new to me, but I was pleased with the way that the boxwood worked.

Here's the progress I've made so far

















I'm awaiting some information on the exact angle of the iron from Denmark's National Museum before I can finish the task…... Some time later Here's the finished plane

Oh, and here's my first Roman Plane..
 

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Taking shape

In the first couple of centuries or so A.D, The Germani tribe was dominant in northern Denmark. Following military victories, it was their tradition to hurl war booty into the nearest bog!

Just near Odense, is a massive bog called Vimose containing a considerable quantity of these war booty sacrifices. In the 1860s excavations took place there and the peaty conditions preserved a large number of wooden objects including two wooden planes, probably made by the Romans, now known as Vimose A and B. Vimose A is in remarkable condition and I am currently making a reconstruction, in boxwood, the same material as the original.

See the December 2008 issue of The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association for a paper on this and other planes from the first millennium AD.

The plane measures only about 10" long x 1.5" wide and has a sole that is hollow which indicates that it was used to make handles for spears and lances.

The replica will eventually be placed in a private museum in Yorkshire.

I am grateful to the most helpful south of England woodturner George Foweraker kindly providing the beautiful piece of boxwood when I couldn't locate a suitable piece. Carving is pretty well new to me, but I was pleased with the way that the boxwood worked.

Here's the progress I've made so far

















I'm awaiting some information on the exact angle of the iron from Denmark's National Museum before I can finish the task…... Some time later Here's the finished plane

Oh, and here's my first Roman Plane..
Ooohhh!!

I loved the last Roman plane. Seeing a new one take shape has me giddy as a school girl!

I am jealous of you for having the right contacts to be able to replicate these objects.
 

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Taking shape

In the first couple of centuries or so A.D, The Germani tribe was dominant in northern Denmark. Following military victories, it was their tradition to hurl war booty into the nearest bog!

Just near Odense, is a massive bog called Vimose containing a considerable quantity of these war booty sacrifices. In the 1860s excavations took place there and the peaty conditions preserved a large number of wooden objects including two wooden planes, probably made by the Romans, now known as Vimose A and B. Vimose A is in remarkable condition and I am currently making a reconstruction, in boxwood, the same material as the original.

See the December 2008 issue of The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association for a paper on this and other planes from the first millennium AD.

The plane measures only about 10" long x 1.5" wide and has a sole that is hollow which indicates that it was used to make handles for spears and lances.

The replica will eventually be placed in a private museum in Yorkshire.

I am grateful to the most helpful south of England woodturner George Foweraker kindly providing the beautiful piece of boxwood when I couldn't locate a suitable piece. Carving is pretty well new to me, but I was pleased with the way that the boxwood worked.

Here's the progress I've made so far

















I'm awaiting some information on the exact angle of the iron from Denmark's National Museum before I can finish the task…... Some time later Here's the finished plane

Oh, and here's my first Roman Plane..
Fascinating!

I'm sure the replica will be much finer than the original!
 

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Taking shape

In the first couple of centuries or so A.D, The Germani tribe was dominant in northern Denmark. Following military victories, it was their tradition to hurl war booty into the nearest bog!

Just near Odense, is a massive bog called Vimose containing a considerable quantity of these war booty sacrifices. In the 1860s excavations took place there and the peaty conditions preserved a large number of wooden objects including two wooden planes, probably made by the Romans, now known as Vimose A and B. Vimose A is in remarkable condition and I am currently making a reconstruction, in boxwood, the same material as the original.

See the December 2008 issue of The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association for a paper on this and other planes from the first millennium AD.

The plane measures only about 10" long x 1.5" wide and has a sole that is hollow which indicates that it was used to make handles for spears and lances.

The replica will eventually be placed in a private museum in Yorkshire.

I am grateful to the most helpful south of England woodturner George Foweraker kindly providing the beautiful piece of boxwood when I couldn't locate a suitable piece. Carving is pretty well new to me, but I was pleased with the way that the boxwood worked.

Here's the progress I've made so far

















I'm awaiting some information on the exact angle of the iron from Denmark's National Museum before I can finish the task…... Some time later Here's the finished plane

Oh, and here's my first Roman Plane..
Stewart. A fantstik trip you are taking.. I'm very glad that you are doing this for a museaum.
 

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Taking shape

In the first couple of centuries or so A.D, The Germani tribe was dominant in northern Denmark. Following military victories, it was their tradition to hurl war booty into the nearest bog!

Just near Odense, is a massive bog called Vimose containing a considerable quantity of these war booty sacrifices. In the 1860s excavations took place there and the peaty conditions preserved a large number of wooden objects including two wooden planes, probably made by the Romans, now known as Vimose A and B. Vimose A is in remarkable condition and I am currently making a reconstruction, in boxwood, the same material as the original.

See the December 2008 issue of The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association for a paper on this and other planes from the first millennium AD.

The plane measures only about 10" long x 1.5" wide and has a sole that is hollow which indicates that it was used to make handles for spears and lances.

The replica will eventually be placed in a private museum in Yorkshire.

I am grateful to the most helpful south of England woodturner George Foweraker kindly providing the beautiful piece of boxwood when I couldn't locate a suitable piece. Carving is pretty well new to me, but I was pleased with the way that the boxwood worked.

Here's the progress I've made so far

















I'm awaiting some information on the exact angle of the iron from Denmark's National Museum before I can finish the task…... Some time later Here's the finished plane

Oh, and here's my first Roman Plane..
hope you will give us a demo before the museum gets it!
 

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Taking shape

In the first couple of centuries or so A.D, The Germani tribe was dominant in northern Denmark. Following military victories, it was their tradition to hurl war booty into the nearest bog!

Just near Odense, is a massive bog called Vimose containing a considerable quantity of these war booty sacrifices. In the 1860s excavations took place there and the peaty conditions preserved a large number of wooden objects including two wooden planes, probably made by the Romans, now known as Vimose A and B. Vimose A is in remarkable condition and I am currently making a reconstruction, in boxwood, the same material as the original.

See the December 2008 issue of The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association for a paper on this and other planes from the first millennium AD.

The plane measures only about 10" long x 1.5" wide and has a sole that is hollow which indicates that it was used to make handles for spears and lances.

The replica will eventually be placed in a private museum in Yorkshire.

I am grateful to the most helpful south of England woodturner George Foweraker kindly providing the beautiful piece of boxwood when I couldn't locate a suitable piece. Carving is pretty well new to me, but I was pleased with the way that the boxwood worked.

Here's the progress I've made so far

















I'm awaiting some information on the exact angle of the iron from Denmark's National Museum before I can finish the task…... Some time later Here's the finished plane

Oh, and here's my first Roman Plane..
Another great job Stewart. Those Romans sure were craftsmen.
 

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Taking shape

In the first couple of centuries or so A.D, The Germani tribe was dominant in northern Denmark. Following military victories, it was their tradition to hurl war booty into the nearest bog!

Just near Odense, is a massive bog called Vimose containing a considerable quantity of these war booty sacrifices. In the 1860s excavations took place there and the peaty conditions preserved a large number of wooden objects including two wooden planes, probably made by the Romans, now known as Vimose A and B. Vimose A is in remarkable condition and I am currently making a reconstruction, in boxwood, the same material as the original.

See the December 2008 issue of The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association for a paper on this and other planes from the first millennium AD.

The plane measures only about 10" long x 1.5" wide and has a sole that is hollow which indicates that it was used to make handles for spears and lances.

The replica will eventually be placed in a private museum in Yorkshire.

I am grateful to the most helpful south of England woodturner George Foweraker kindly providing the beautiful piece of boxwood when I couldn't locate a suitable piece. Carving is pretty well new to me, but I was pleased with the way that the boxwood worked.

Here's the progress I've made so far

















I'm awaiting some information on the exact angle of the iron from Denmark's National Museum before I can finish the task…... Some time later Here's the finished plane

Oh, and here's my first Roman Plane..
WOW
 

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Taking shape

In the first couple of centuries or so A.D, The Germani tribe was dominant in northern Denmark. Following military victories, it was their tradition to hurl war booty into the nearest bog!

Just near Odense, is a massive bog called Vimose containing a considerable quantity of these war booty sacrifices. In the 1860s excavations took place there and the peaty conditions preserved a large number of wooden objects including two wooden planes, probably made by the Romans, now known as Vimose A and B. Vimose A is in remarkable condition and I am currently making a reconstruction, in boxwood, the same material as the original.

See the December 2008 issue of The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association for a paper on this and other planes from the first millennium AD.

The plane measures only about 10" long x 1.5" wide and has a sole that is hollow which indicates that it was used to make handles for spears and lances.

The replica will eventually be placed in a private museum in Yorkshire.

I am grateful to the most helpful south of England woodturner George Foweraker kindly providing the beautiful piece of boxwood when I couldn't locate a suitable piece. Carving is pretty well new to me, but I was pleased with the way that the boxwood worked.

Here's the progress I've made so far

















I'm awaiting some information on the exact angle of the iron from Denmark's National Museum before I can finish the task…... Some time later Here's the finished plane

Oh, and here's my first Roman Plane..
Amazing! I love history and recreating period crafts, so this is right up my alley.

badger
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Taking shape

In the first couple of centuries or so A.D, The Germani tribe was dominant in northern Denmark. Following military victories, it was their tradition to hurl war booty into the nearest bog!

Just near Odense, is a massive bog called Vimose containing a considerable quantity of these war booty sacrifices. In the 1860s excavations took place there and the peaty conditions preserved a large number of wooden objects including two wooden planes, probably made by the Romans, now known as Vimose A and B. Vimose A is in remarkable condition and I am currently making a reconstruction, in boxwood, the same material as the original.

See the December 2008 issue of The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association for a paper on this and other planes from the first millennium AD.

The plane measures only about 10" long x 1.5" wide and has a sole that is hollow which indicates that it was used to make handles for spears and lances.

The replica will eventually be placed in a private museum in Yorkshire.

I am grateful to the most helpful south of England woodturner George Foweraker kindly providing the beautiful piece of boxwood when I couldn't locate a suitable piece. Carving is pretty well new to me, but I was pleased with the way that the boxwood worked.

Here's the progress I've made so far

















I'm awaiting some information on the exact angle of the iron from Denmark's National Museum before I can finish the task…... Some time later Here's the finished plane

Oh, and here's my first Roman Plane..
Glad it's given some pleasure folks. It'll certainly get some use before the handover kiwi1969; I'll report back. I often use the one with the metal soleplate.
 

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Taking shape

In the first couple of centuries or so A.D, The Germani tribe was dominant in northern Denmark. Following military victories, it was their tradition to hurl war booty into the nearest bog!

Just near Odense, is a massive bog called Vimose containing a considerable quantity of these war booty sacrifices. In the 1860s excavations took place there and the peaty conditions preserved a large number of wooden objects including two wooden planes, probably made by the Romans, now known as Vimose A and B. Vimose A is in remarkable condition and I am currently making a reconstruction, in boxwood, the same material as the original.

See the December 2008 issue of The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association for a paper on this and other planes from the first millennium AD.

The plane measures only about 10" long x 1.5" wide and has a sole that is hollow which indicates that it was used to make handles for spears and lances.

The replica will eventually be placed in a private museum in Yorkshire.

I am grateful to the most helpful south of England woodturner George Foweraker kindly providing the beautiful piece of boxwood when I couldn't locate a suitable piece. Carving is pretty well new to me, but I was pleased with the way that the boxwood worked.

Here's the progress I've made so far

















I'm awaiting some information on the exact angle of the iron from Denmark's National Museum before I can finish the task…... Some time later Here's the finished plane

Oh, and here's my first Roman Plane..
Other than that article (which I am working on getting a copy of eventually) what are some good sources for information and pictures of early (medieval or roman) planes and woodworking tools?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Taking shape

In the first couple of centuries or so A.D, The Germani tribe was dominant in northern Denmark. Following military victories, it was their tradition to hurl war booty into the nearest bog!

Just near Odense, is a massive bog called Vimose containing a considerable quantity of these war booty sacrifices. In the 1860s excavations took place there and the peaty conditions preserved a large number of wooden objects including two wooden planes, probably made by the Romans, now known as Vimose A and B. Vimose A is in remarkable condition and I am currently making a reconstruction, in boxwood, the same material as the original.

See the December 2008 issue of The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association for a paper on this and other planes from the first millennium AD.

The plane measures only about 10" long x 1.5" wide and has a sole that is hollow which indicates that it was used to make handles for spears and lances.

The replica will eventually be placed in a private museum in Yorkshire.

I am grateful to the most helpful south of England woodturner George Foweraker kindly providing the beautiful piece of boxwood when I couldn't locate a suitable piece. Carving is pretty well new to me, but I was pleased with the way that the boxwood worked.

Here's the progress I've made so far

















I'm awaiting some information on the exact angle of the iron from Denmark's National Museum before I can finish the task…... Some time later Here's the finished plane

Oh, and here's my first Roman Plane..
Here are some bits and pieces that might be of use Badger...

http://villagecarpenter.blogspot.com/2008/03/roman-woodworking.html

http://toolemerablog.typepad.com/toolemera/2007/12/roman-woodworki.html

http://www.nytimes.com/1997/05/11/nyregion/the-various-uses-for-wood-planes.html

http://blog.woodworking-magazine.com/blog/Friends+Krenovians++Countrymen.aspx

http://blog.woodworking-magazine.com/blog/Romanstyle+Handplane+Completato.aspx

W.L. Goodman's "The History of Woodworking Tools."

http://books.google.com/books?id=DDh5yOgfnuoC&pg=PA358&vq=goodmanham&dq=roman+plane&source=gbs_search_s&sig=BwaKLTzZGB7ecQDYd3gsY29Tu1o#PPA43,M1
 

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Taking shape

In the first couple of centuries or so A.D, The Germani tribe was dominant in northern Denmark. Following military victories, it was their tradition to hurl war booty into the nearest bog!

Just near Odense, is a massive bog called Vimose containing a considerable quantity of these war booty sacrifices. In the 1860s excavations took place there and the peaty conditions preserved a large number of wooden objects including two wooden planes, probably made by the Romans, now known as Vimose A and B. Vimose A is in remarkable condition and I am currently making a reconstruction, in boxwood, the same material as the original.

See the December 2008 issue of The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association for a paper on this and other planes from the first millennium AD.

The plane measures only about 10" long x 1.5" wide and has a sole that is hollow which indicates that it was used to make handles for spears and lances.

The replica will eventually be placed in a private museum in Yorkshire.

I am grateful to the most helpful south of England woodturner George Foweraker kindly providing the beautiful piece of boxwood when I couldn't locate a suitable piece. Carving is pretty well new to me, but I was pleased with the way that the boxwood worked.

Here's the progress I've made so far

















I'm awaiting some information on the exact angle of the iron from Denmark's National Museum before I can finish the task…... Some time later Here's the finished plane

Oh, and here's my first Roman Plane..
Thanks! I'll take a look through those.
 

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Taking shape

In the first couple of centuries or so A.D, The Germani tribe was dominant in northern Denmark. Following military victories, it was their tradition to hurl war booty into the nearest bog!

Just near Odense, is a massive bog called Vimose containing a considerable quantity of these war booty sacrifices. In the 1860s excavations took place there and the peaty conditions preserved a large number of wooden objects including two wooden planes, probably made by the Romans, now known as Vimose A and B. Vimose A is in remarkable condition and I am currently making a reconstruction, in boxwood, the same material as the original.

See the December 2008 issue of The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association for a paper on this and other planes from the first millennium AD.

The plane measures only about 10" long x 1.5" wide and has a sole that is hollow which indicates that it was used to make handles for spears and lances.

The replica will eventually be placed in a private museum in Yorkshire.

I am grateful to the most helpful south of England woodturner George Foweraker kindly providing the beautiful piece of boxwood when I couldn't locate a suitable piece. Carving is pretty well new to me, but I was pleased with the way that the boxwood worked.

Here's the progress I've made so far

















I'm awaiting some information on the exact angle of the iron from Denmark's National Museum before I can finish the task…... Some time later Here's the finished plane

Oh, and here's my first Roman Plane..
I really like this plane. Quite beautiful. You have done an excellent job on the reproduction.
 

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Taking shape

In the first couple of centuries or so A.D, The Germani tribe was dominant in northern Denmark. Following military victories, it was their tradition to hurl war booty into the nearest bog!

Just near Odense, is a massive bog called Vimose containing a considerable quantity of these war booty sacrifices. In the 1860s excavations took place there and the peaty conditions preserved a large number of wooden objects including two wooden planes, probably made by the Romans, now known as Vimose A and B. Vimose A is in remarkable condition and I am currently making a reconstruction, in boxwood, the same material as the original.

See the December 2008 issue of The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association for a paper on this and other planes from the first millennium AD.

The plane measures only about 10" long x 1.5" wide and has a sole that is hollow which indicates that it was used to make handles for spears and lances.

The replica will eventually be placed in a private museum in Yorkshire.

I am grateful to the most helpful south of England woodturner George Foweraker kindly providing the beautiful piece of boxwood when I couldn't locate a suitable piece. Carving is pretty well new to me, but I was pleased with the way that the boxwood worked.

Here's the progress I've made so far

















I'm awaiting some information on the exact angle of the iron from Denmark's National Museum before I can finish the task…... Some time later Here's the finished plane

Oh, and here's my first Roman Plane..
Great job , Stewart….did you ever finish it ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Taking shape

In the first couple of centuries or so A.D, The Germani tribe was dominant in northern Denmark. Following military victories, it was their tradition to hurl war booty into the nearest bog!

Just near Odense, is a massive bog called Vimose containing a considerable quantity of these war booty sacrifices. In the 1860s excavations took place there and the peaty conditions preserved a large number of wooden objects including two wooden planes, probably made by the Romans, now known as Vimose A and B. Vimose A is in remarkable condition and I am currently making a reconstruction, in boxwood, the same material as the original.

See the December 2008 issue of The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association for a paper on this and other planes from the first millennium AD.

The plane measures only about 10" long x 1.5" wide and has a sole that is hollow which indicates that it was used to make handles for spears and lances.

The replica will eventually be placed in a private museum in Yorkshire.

I am grateful to the most helpful south of England woodturner George Foweraker kindly providing the beautiful piece of boxwood when I couldn't locate a suitable piece. Carving is pretty well new to me, but I was pleased with the way that the boxwood worked.

Here's the progress I've made so far

















I'm awaiting some information on the exact angle of the iron from Denmark's National Museum before I can finish the task…... Some time later Here's the finished plane

Oh, and here's my first Roman Plane..
Hello Dusty56 . Here is the finished plane. I should have provided a link before now!
 

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Taking shape

In the first couple of centuries or so A.D, The Germani tribe was dominant in northern Denmark. Following military victories, it was their tradition to hurl war booty into the nearest bog!

Just near Odense, is a massive bog called Vimose containing a considerable quantity of these war booty sacrifices. In the 1860s excavations took place there and the peaty conditions preserved a large number of wooden objects including two wooden planes, probably made by the Romans, now known as Vimose A and B. Vimose A is in remarkable condition and I am currently making a reconstruction, in boxwood, the same material as the original.

See the December 2008 issue of The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association for a paper on this and other planes from the first millennium AD.

The plane measures only about 10" long x 1.5" wide and has a sole that is hollow which indicates that it was used to make handles for spears and lances.

The replica will eventually be placed in a private museum in Yorkshire.

I am grateful to the most helpful south of England woodturner George Foweraker kindly providing the beautiful piece of boxwood when I couldn't locate a suitable piece. Carving is pretty well new to me, but I was pleased with the way that the boxwood worked.

Here's the progress I've made so far

















I'm awaiting some information on the exact angle of the iron from Denmark's National Museum before I can finish the task…... Some time later Here's the finished plane

Oh, and here's my first Roman Plane..
Thanks for the link , Stewart…it certainly came out nice : ) While I have your attention , Sir ….Happy Holidays to you and yours and keep up the fantastic craftsmanship !
 
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