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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In the beginning...

Many moons ago(ok, only about a year ago) I picked up my first issue of Woodworing Magazine at the local bookseller, entranced by the beautiful wall cabinet that graced it's front cover(below.) I purchased it before I had most of my tooling and knew someday I would build it.



I began studying the article, every photo, every drawing, memorizing dimensions and going through the build in my mind. I built a true to life sketchup model (see image below) based on the dimensions in the magazine so I could better understand how the whole project would come together.



Here I am, a year later, and finally beginning the build. I finally committed to building it when thinking of what to get my father for Christmas.(He's one of those, already has one of everything types) My father collects antique furniture and case pieces primarily in Walnut from both early American and European makers. Unfortunately, I can't afford walnut as used in the magazine, or in the furniture he collects, but from what I've seen available locally at a reasonable price, birch seems to have a fairly similar grain pattern. Now while I know it's not nearly as nice as walnut, given my resources, it's the best I can do.

In the next part, we'll start milling our stock and prepping for the face frame joinery… Stay tuned.
 

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In the beginning...

Many moons ago(ok, only about a year ago) I picked up my first issue of Woodworing Magazine at the local bookseller, entranced by the beautiful wall cabinet that graced it's front cover(below.) I purchased it before I had most of my tooling and knew someday I would build it.



I began studying the article, every photo, every drawing, memorizing dimensions and going through the build in my mind. I built a true to life sketchup model (see image below) based on the dimensions in the magazine so I could better understand how the whole project would come together.



Here I am, a year later, and finally beginning the build. I finally committed to building it when thinking of what to get my father for Christmas.(He's one of those, already has one of everything types) My father collects antique furniture and case pieces primarily in Walnut from both early American and European makers. Unfortunately, I can't afford walnut as used in the magazine, or in the furniture he collects, but from what I've seen available locally at a reasonable price, birch seems to have a fairly similar grain pattern. Now while I know it's not nearly as nice as walnut, given my resources, it's the best I can do.

In the next part, we'll start milling our stock and prepping for the face frame joinery… Stay tuned.
Hey Mark
That's the way it works sometimes. look forward to progress
 

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In the beginning...

Many moons ago(ok, only about a year ago) I picked up my first issue of Woodworing Magazine at the local bookseller, entranced by the beautiful wall cabinet that graced it's front cover(below.) I purchased it before I had most of my tooling and knew someday I would build it.



I began studying the article, every photo, every drawing, memorizing dimensions and going through the build in my mind. I built a true to life sketchup model (see image below) based on the dimensions in the magazine so I could better understand how the whole project would come together.



Here I am, a year later, and finally beginning the build. I finally committed to building it when thinking of what to get my father for Christmas.(He's one of those, already has one of everything types) My father collects antique furniture and case pieces primarily in Walnut from both early American and European makers. Unfortunately, I can't afford walnut as used in the magazine, or in the furniture he collects, but from what I've seen available locally at a reasonable price, birch seems to have a fairly similar grain pattern. Now while I know it's not nearly as nice as walnut, given my resources, it's the best I can do.

In the next part, we'll start milling our stock and prepping for the face frame joinery… Stay tuned.
That's a great project. Can't wait to see it come to fruition from your Sketchup drawing.
 

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In the beginning...

Many moons ago(ok, only about a year ago) I picked up my first issue of Woodworing Magazine at the local bookseller, entranced by the beautiful wall cabinet that graced it's front cover(below.) I purchased it before I had most of my tooling and knew someday I would build it.



I began studying the article, every photo, every drawing, memorizing dimensions and going through the build in my mind. I built a true to life sketchup model (see image below) based on the dimensions in the magazine so I could better understand how the whole project would come together.



Here I am, a year later, and finally beginning the build. I finally committed to building it when thinking of what to get my father for Christmas.(He's one of those, already has one of everything types) My father collects antique furniture and case pieces primarily in Walnut from both early American and European makers. Unfortunately, I can't afford walnut as used in the magazine, or in the furniture he collects, but from what I've seen available locally at a reasonable price, birch seems to have a fairly similar grain pattern. Now while I know it's not nearly as nice as walnut, given my resources, it's the best I can do.

In the next part, we'll start milling our stock and prepping for the face frame joinery… Stay tuned.
Birch can work out quite well.

You might try downsizing the embedded picture one size. It looks like it runs off the screen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
In the beginning...

Many moons ago(ok, only about a year ago) I picked up my first issue of Woodworing Magazine at the local bookseller, entranced by the beautiful wall cabinet that graced it's front cover(below.) I purchased it before I had most of my tooling and knew someday I would build it.



I began studying the article, every photo, every drawing, memorizing dimensions and going through the build in my mind. I built a true to life sketchup model (see image below) based on the dimensions in the magazine so I could better understand how the whole project would come together.



Here I am, a year later, and finally beginning the build. I finally committed to building it when thinking of what to get my father for Christmas.(He's one of those, already has one of everything types) My father collects antique furniture and case pieces primarily in Walnut from both early American and European makers. Unfortunately, I can't afford walnut as used in the magazine, or in the furniture he collects, but from what I've seen available locally at a reasonable price, birch seems to have a fairly similar grain pattern. Now while I know it's not nearly as nice as walnut, given my resources, it's the best I can do.

In the next part, we'll start milling our stock and prepping for the face frame joinery… Stay tuned.
Todd, thank you for pointing that out, I've cropped the dead space off on the sides and it appears to fit within the bounds of the page now. :)
 

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In the beginning...

Many moons ago(ok, only about a year ago) I picked up my first issue of Woodworing Magazine at the local bookseller, entranced by the beautiful wall cabinet that graced it's front cover(below.) I purchased it before I had most of my tooling and knew someday I would build it.



I began studying the article, every photo, every drawing, memorizing dimensions and going through the build in my mind. I built a true to life sketchup model (see image below) based on the dimensions in the magazine so I could better understand how the whole project would come together.



Here I am, a year later, and finally beginning the build. I finally committed to building it when thinking of what to get my father for Christmas.(He's one of those, already has one of everything types) My father collects antique furniture and case pieces primarily in Walnut from both early American and European makers. Unfortunately, I can't afford walnut as used in the magazine, or in the furniture he collects, but from what I've seen available locally at a reasonable price, birch seems to have a fairly similar grain pattern. Now while I know it's not nearly as nice as walnut, given my resources, it's the best I can do.

In the next part, we'll start milling our stock and prepping for the face frame joinery… Stay tuned.
Good model, Mark. I'm looking forward to watching the progress while you build the cupboard. Just for the heck of it, I took your model and reoriented the wood grain of some of the components. I hope you don't mind.



I like the dynamic components!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
In the beginning...

Many moons ago(ok, only about a year ago) I picked up my first issue of Woodworing Magazine at the local bookseller, entranced by the beautiful wall cabinet that graced it's front cover(below.) I purchased it before I had most of my tooling and knew someday I would build it.



I began studying the article, every photo, every drawing, memorizing dimensions and going through the build in my mind. I built a true to life sketchup model (see image below) based on the dimensions in the magazine so I could better understand how the whole project would come together.



Here I am, a year later, and finally beginning the build. I finally committed to building it when thinking of what to get my father for Christmas.(He's one of those, already has one of everything types) My father collects antique furniture and case pieces primarily in Walnut from both early American and European makers. Unfortunately, I can't afford walnut as used in the magazine, or in the furniture he collects, but from what I've seen available locally at a reasonable price, birch seems to have a fairly similar grain pattern. Now while I know it's not nearly as nice as walnut, given my resources, it's the best I can do.

In the next part, we'll start milling our stock and prepping for the face frame joinery… Stay tuned.
Jack,
I like your texturing job much better ;-) I have a habit of just throwing texture on a model to break up the sterile look of the shaded model without regard to things like grain orientation or scaling. The dynamic components aspect of the model is pretty cool, it was just a fun addition at the end… I planned on adding the rat tail hinges(in two pieces so they would animate with the door,) knobs on the drawer, and the keyhole in the left door stile, but never found the time. I can't wait until I have the completed project in front of me. I have a feeling I'll be building a second for myself when time/money permits.

P.S. I just took a look at your site, outstanding! What do you use for rendering such photo-realistic images of models?
 

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In the beginning...

Many moons ago(ok, only about a year ago) I picked up my first issue of Woodworing Magazine at the local bookseller, entranced by the beautiful wall cabinet that graced it's front cover(below.) I purchased it before I had most of my tooling and knew someday I would build it.



I began studying the article, every photo, every drawing, memorizing dimensions and going through the build in my mind. I built a true to life sketchup model (see image below) based on the dimensions in the magazine so I could better understand how the whole project would come together.



Here I am, a year later, and finally beginning the build. I finally committed to building it when thinking of what to get my father for Christmas.(He's one of those, already has one of everything types) My father collects antique furniture and case pieces primarily in Walnut from both early American and European makers. Unfortunately, I can't afford walnut as used in the magazine, or in the furniture he collects, but from what I've seen available locally at a reasonable price, birch seems to have a fairly similar grain pattern. Now while I know it's not nearly as nice as walnut, given my resources, it's the best I can do.

In the next part, we'll start milling our stock and prepping for the face frame joinery… Stay tuned.
Looks beautiful! Hope the project comes out even better!
 
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In the beginning...

Many moons ago(ok, only about a year ago) I picked up my first issue of Woodworing Magazine at the local bookseller, entranced by the beautiful wall cabinet that graced it's front cover(below.) I purchased it before I had most of my tooling and knew someday I would build it.



I began studying the article, every photo, every drawing, memorizing dimensions and going through the build in my mind. I built a true to life sketchup model (see image below) based on the dimensions in the magazine so I could better understand how the whole project would come together.



Here I am, a year later, and finally beginning the build. I finally committed to building it when thinking of what to get my father for Christmas.(He's one of those, already has one of everything types) My father collects antique furniture and case pieces primarily in Walnut from both early American and European makers. Unfortunately, I can't afford walnut as used in the magazine, or in the furniture he collects, but from what I've seen available locally at a reasonable price, birch seems to have a fairly similar grain pattern. Now while I know it's not nearly as nice as walnut, given my resources, it's the best I can do.

In the next part, we'll start milling our stock and prepping for the face frame joinery… Stay tuned.
This is going to be a beautiful cupboard!
 

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In the beginning...

Many moons ago(ok, only about a year ago) I picked up my first issue of Woodworing Magazine at the local bookseller, entranced by the beautiful wall cabinet that graced it's front cover(below.) I purchased it before I had most of my tooling and knew someday I would build it.



I began studying the article, every photo, every drawing, memorizing dimensions and going through the build in my mind. I built a true to life sketchup model (see image below) based on the dimensions in the magazine so I could better understand how the whole project would come together.



Here I am, a year later, and finally beginning the build. I finally committed to building it when thinking of what to get my father for Christmas.(He's one of those, already has one of everything types) My father collects antique furniture and case pieces primarily in Walnut from both early American and European makers. Unfortunately, I can't afford walnut as used in the magazine, or in the furniture he collects, but from what I've seen available locally at a reasonable price, birch seems to have a fairly similar grain pattern. Now while I know it's not nearly as nice as walnut, given my resources, it's the best I can do.

In the next part, we'll start milling our stock and prepping for the face frame joinery… Stay tuned.
Mark, nice "soon to be completed" project. The birch should work out nicely. Here is a bit of advice based on some recent crib building experience. I attempted to route a profile on some birch, taking light passes (2 passes was the plan). I ended up scraping a really nice piece of stock because I had some nasty tearout where some grain made a U- shape that continued to the edge of the material. So my advise, take lighter passes than you think is necessary to be safe…....good luck.
 

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In the beginning...

Many moons ago(ok, only about a year ago) I picked up my first issue of Woodworing Magazine at the local bookseller, entranced by the beautiful wall cabinet that graced it's front cover(below.) I purchased it before I had most of my tooling and knew someday I would build it.



I began studying the article, every photo, every drawing, memorizing dimensions and going through the build in my mind. I built a true to life sketchup model (see image below) based on the dimensions in the magazine so I could better understand how the whole project would come together.



Here I am, a year later, and finally beginning the build. I finally committed to building it when thinking of what to get my father for Christmas.(He's one of those, already has one of everything types) My father collects antique furniture and case pieces primarily in Walnut from both early American and European makers. Unfortunately, I can't afford walnut as used in the magazine, or in the furniture he collects, but from what I've seen available locally at a reasonable price, birch seems to have a fairly similar grain pattern. Now while I know it's not nearly as nice as walnut, given my resources, it's the best I can do.

In the next part, we'll start milling our stock and prepping for the face frame joinery… Stay tuned.
Mark, Thanks for the feedback about my site. The rendering program that I have been using is Kerkythea 2008 Echo. It is a free program with features that rival many commercial applications. It has a SketchUp (SU) plugin that exports the SU model to the Kerkythea format.

I've learned enough about it to create some reasonably photo-realistic (PR) renderings of my SU models but, I think I've only scratched the surface of it's capabilities. Here's the link to their home page.

http://www.kerkythea.net/joomla/index.php

Check out their Gallery to get a better idea of its capabilities.

I know many people would think that a PR rendering of an SU model is overkill but I wanted to do it because the LOML has trouble visualizing projects before that are completed. I'm still working on that. Too many other things going on right now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Stock Preparation - Rough Dimensioning

So unfortunately I got carried away actually working rather than documenting the process, but I did snap this photo before I quit for the night.



So far I've gotten all the face frame pieces cut down to final size and have marked out the tenons on the rails. I also cut a test mortise in some scrap that went through the same milling process so I can test the fit of the tenons as I cut them. The dado stack is in the saw ready to rock. I will begin cutting the joinery tonight(I hope to get at least the face frame tenons cut) and will hopefully be able to layout the mortises on the stiles of the face frame.

As I progress I will take better care to document the process.
 

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Stock Preparation - Rough Dimensioning

So unfortunately I got carried away actually working rather than documenting the process, but I did snap this photo before I quit for the night.



So far I've gotten all the face frame pieces cut down to final size and have marked out the tenons on the rails. I also cut a test mortise in some scrap that went through the same milling process so I can test the fit of the tenons as I cut them. The dado stack is in the saw ready to rock. I will begin cutting the joinery tonight(I hope to get at least the face frame tenons cut) and will hopefully be able to layout the mortises on the stiles of the face frame.

As I progress I will take better care to document the process.
The frames look well dimensioned and in good shape - very good start. Good luck!
I'm watching the progress.
 
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Stock Preparation - Rough Dimensioning

So unfortunately I got carried away actually working rather than documenting the process, but I did snap this photo before I quit for the night.



So far I've gotten all the face frame pieces cut down to final size and have marked out the tenons on the rails. I also cut a test mortise in some scrap that went through the same milling process so I can test the fit of the tenons as I cut them. The dado stack is in the saw ready to rock. I will begin cutting the joinery tonight(I hope to get at least the face frame tenons cut) and will hopefully be able to layout the mortises on the stiles of the face frame.

As I progress I will take better care to document the process.
You is off to a great start.
 

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Stock Preparation - Rough Dimensioning

So unfortunately I got carried away actually working rather than documenting the process, but I did snap this photo before I quit for the night.



So far I've gotten all the face frame pieces cut down to final size and have marked out the tenons on the rails. I also cut a test mortise in some scrap that went through the same milling process so I can test the fit of the tenons as I cut them. The dado stack is in the saw ready to rock. I will begin cutting the joinery tonight(I hope to get at least the face frame tenons cut) and will hopefully be able to layout the mortises on the stiles of the face frame.

As I progress I will take better care to document the process.
Hopefully you get the rest of the process it's a challenge to do both sometimes
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Cutting the tenons - What NOT to do...

So last night I began cutting the tenons on the table saw. Now before everyone tells me I'm lucky to still have my fingers or flames me for posting these pics, here's a disclaimer. DO NOT use a table saw without the use of a throat plate. Disastrous things CAN and likely WILL happen… (See Also: Standard disclaimer "Blade Guard Removed for Clarity")

That being said… I've never had problems making cuts with the dado stack in the tablesaw without the use of a throat plate, though I would not recommend this process. I'm sure there are certain cuts that would be impossible without a throat plate, but I have yet to find one.

Below is a process picture of cutting the tenons on the saw.


Here is the face frame with tenons cut on the rails and awaiting marking out mortises in the stiles.


Close up of tenon



As you can see from the close up photos above I have to hit the shoulders of the tenons with a chisel to remove the little 1/64th of an inch of material left on the short shoulders. Overall I'm pleased with the results, however I have discovered that something(table, fence, angle-stop, etc) must have shifted slightly during the move to the new house as my reference points are no longer dead on… I will have to get this sorted out before moving on to the door construction…

In the next part I'll mark out and make the mortises in the stiles and possibly begin the glue-up of the face frame… Stay Tuned!

(P.S. I'm also sorting out issues with my digital camera, I got all set up with a tripod, flash, and remote shutter release last night only to find out that the battery won't hold a charge {{AGAIN}} You would think Nikon would be able to produce a good battery by now… If you have a DSLR that uses the Nikon EN-4 battery you know what I'm talking about…)
 

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Cutting the tenons - What NOT to do...

So last night I began cutting the tenons on the table saw. Now before everyone tells me I'm lucky to still have my fingers or flames me for posting these pics, here's a disclaimer. DO NOT use a table saw without the use of a throat plate. Disastrous things CAN and likely WILL happen… (See Also: Standard disclaimer "Blade Guard Removed for Clarity")

That being said… I've never had problems making cuts with the dado stack in the tablesaw without the use of a throat plate, though I would not recommend this process. I'm sure there are certain cuts that would be impossible without a throat plate, but I have yet to find one.

Below is a process picture of cutting the tenons on the saw.


Here is the face frame with tenons cut on the rails and awaiting marking out mortises in the stiles.


Close up of tenon



As you can see from the close up photos above I have to hit the shoulders of the tenons with a chisel to remove the little 1/64th of an inch of material left on the short shoulders. Overall I'm pleased with the results, however I have discovered that something(table, fence, angle-stop, etc) must have shifted slightly during the move to the new house as my reference points are no longer dead on… I will have to get this sorted out before moving on to the door construction…

In the next part I'll mark out and make the mortises in the stiles and possibly begin the glue-up of the face frame… Stay Tuned!

(P.S. I'm also sorting out issues with my digital camera, I got all set up with a tripod, flash, and remote shutter release last night only to find out that the battery won't hold a charge {{AGAIN}} You would think Nikon would be able to produce a good battery by now… If you have a DSLR that uses the Nikon EN-4 battery you know what I'm talking about…)
good start
 

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Cutting the tenons - What NOT to do...

So last night I began cutting the tenons on the table saw. Now before everyone tells me I'm lucky to still have my fingers or flames me for posting these pics, here's a disclaimer. DO NOT use a table saw without the use of a throat plate. Disastrous things CAN and likely WILL happen… (See Also: Standard disclaimer "Blade Guard Removed for Clarity")

That being said… I've never had problems making cuts with the dado stack in the tablesaw without the use of a throat plate, though I would not recommend this process. I'm sure there are certain cuts that would be impossible without a throat plate, but I have yet to find one.

Below is a process picture of cutting the tenons on the saw.


Here is the face frame with tenons cut on the rails and awaiting marking out mortises in the stiles.


Close up of tenon



As you can see from the close up photos above I have to hit the shoulders of the tenons with a chisel to remove the little 1/64th of an inch of material left on the short shoulders. Overall I'm pleased with the results, however I have discovered that something(table, fence, angle-stop, etc) must have shifted slightly during the move to the new house as my reference points are no longer dead on… I will have to get this sorted out before moving on to the door construction…

In the next part I'll mark out and make the mortises in the stiles and possibly begin the glue-up of the face frame… Stay Tuned!

(P.S. I'm also sorting out issues with my digital camera, I got all set up with a tripod, flash, and remote shutter release last night only to find out that the battery won't hold a charge {{AGAIN}} You would think Nikon would be able to produce a good battery by now… If you have a DSLR that uses the Nikon EN-4 battery you know what I'm talking about…)
Good progress!
 

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Cutting the tenons - What NOT to do...

So last night I began cutting the tenons on the table saw. Now before everyone tells me I'm lucky to still have my fingers or flames me for posting these pics, here's a disclaimer. DO NOT use a table saw without the use of a throat plate. Disastrous things CAN and likely WILL happen… (See Also: Standard disclaimer "Blade Guard Removed for Clarity")

That being said… I've never had problems making cuts with the dado stack in the tablesaw without the use of a throat plate, though I would not recommend this process. I'm sure there are certain cuts that would be impossible without a throat plate, but I have yet to find one.

Below is a process picture of cutting the tenons on the saw.


Here is the face frame with tenons cut on the rails and awaiting marking out mortises in the stiles.


Close up of tenon



As you can see from the close up photos above I have to hit the shoulders of the tenons with a chisel to remove the little 1/64th of an inch of material left on the short shoulders. Overall I'm pleased with the results, however I have discovered that something(table, fence, angle-stop, etc) must have shifted slightly during the move to the new house as my reference points are no longer dead on… I will have to get this sorted out before moving on to the door construction…

In the next part I'll mark out and make the mortises in the stiles and possibly begin the glue-up of the face frame… Stay Tuned!

(P.S. I'm also sorting out issues with my digital camera, I got all set up with a tripod, flash, and remote shutter release last night only to find out that the battery won't hold a charge {{AGAIN}} You would think Nikon would be able to produce a good battery by now… If you have a DSLR that uses the Nikon EN-4 battery you know what I'm talking about…)
I'm AMAZED that you don't get tear-out. If I didn't see photos, I wouldn't have believed it. lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
3D Rendering/Texturing in Sketchup

So after the tip from Jack regarding Kerkythea I decided to download it and play around. I found some amazing wood textures at Arroway Textures of different wood species(they have a sample available for each species for non-commercial use) and started applying them to the model… below are some shots of the results. If you click on the exploded view it will open a large version rendered at the highest available pixel setting in Kerkythea. There are a few spots where the texture is applied 90 degrees to how it should be, but over all, it looks decent. The default glass texture from Sketchup needs some work opacity wise as it currently looks like a big blue sheet of plastic…



Closed View


Open View


Lower Right


From Below


Lower Left


This was a great learning experience today while I was away from the shop. I'll definitely be exploring the 3D rendering more for future projects and learning more about applying textures in sketchup. Let me know in the comments if you'd like to see a tutorial on applying textures with proper grain orientation and rendering in Kerkythea.
 
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