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Hey guys!

I picked up a Grizzly 6×46" Jointer - mostly due to limited shop space. I'd love to have something larger but I don't have the room.

I've jointed a few 4' 2×4"s just to test the machine and make sure it's working properly and it does seem to work fine.

I am thinking with longer boards it would be ideal to have a roller stand past the outfeed just to help remove droop. Being able to adjust it perfectly to the height of the outfeed would be fantastic but I think that would require an amazing height adjustment mechanism as well as some way to measure whether the height is exactly the same.

I'm thinking just slightly lower than the table or as close to the height as possible without going over would at least help.

Any thoughts? Any suggestions on a roller stand that is easy to adjust height for minor adjustments?

For anything particularly heavy and log or wider than 6" I plan on hand planing so I am just looking to make the Grizzly a little easier to use in a mobile set-up. I store it up against the wall out of the way and move it out and away from the wall to use it so I have clearance for the infeed/outfeed.
 

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I've never used roller stands with the jointer, but many have when jointing long stock. Most suggest two stands, one on each side (in feed and out feed) and to get them level with the tables using a straight edge.

Cheers,
Brad

Edit: Having thought about it a bit, I really don't know if having the stands either slightly higher or lower would make much difference or which one would be preferable if you HAD to have a slight misalignment. I guess you could empirically determine which is better (if at all) through testing each height. Set the stand up a bit lower, place some stock across the table and stand. and then push down on the stock over the table to see if there is any movement at the opposite (in feed) end… then try with the stand slightly higher and do the same.
 

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If you're considering an adjustable roller stand you may want to have a look at one of these. Ridgid model#9934 flip top work support. The flip stand is more forgiving than the roller stands and can be used two ways. One, where it flips into place & two,in a fixed position. The Ridgid model also has legs that provide a more stable stance than the roller types & sandbag hooks to help keep them in place. You have to set the cylindrical roller ones at their "sweet spot" or risk kickback if you want to use at the table saw. All of the roller stands that I've had in the past had inadequate threads at the height adjustment resulting in stripped handles. I had to use small c clamps to hold the top of the stand in place.
 

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Maybe built you a outfeed table like is done for a table saw,then when not using it for the jointer you can use it to stack parts for milling else wear in your shop.
Also I get this in spell check ever time what is your take.
1.table saw or
2.tablesaw?
 

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I agree with MrUnix.

Respectfully, rick1955, you can successfully have infeed and outfeed roller stands if you take the time to set them up accurately. Important to make sure they are 90 degrees to the feed direction.

I like your table extensions, but for jointing 1 long board I've done it quite successfully.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
This would just be for one-off situations where I want to joint it, don't want to cut it first, and don't have the free time to hand plane it. Hand planing would be preferable but I wanted to know if rollers were a workable solution as needed.

Thank you everybody for the help!
 

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+1 for the flip top stands from Ridgid, they don't influence the directional travel of the stock the way a roller does when it's a few hairs off of level.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The flip-top does look nice. See some complaints about handles breaking and some about the tops not letting wood slide easily. Both easily remidied if it happens as they're $29. Going to give them a try.
 

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The flip-top supports handles are 10x better than the roller type supports. I've been using the flip-tops for about three years with no handle problems. They have even withstood the employee test The roller type handles only have three maybe four threads and I never had one last more then a couple weeks. I never had the roller type make it past the first day when exposed to the employee test. I did use the roller types for years with a striped handle. I used a small C-clap on the shaft to set the height. Kinda a pain though. When tightening the C-clap the roller would creep up making height setting more difficult.

The flip-top design is more forgiving than roller types when setting support height & not having to be perpendicular to the rip fence. If the roller stand is not square to the fence the stock will creep into or away from the fence adding to frustration and compromising safety of work preformed.

The leg design on the flip-top allows use on more surface types than the rollers too.

I've used the flip-tops like saw horses for hand held router applications. You can use a clamp on them, difficult to do with the roller.

The flip-tops cost more than the roller types but , last longer. In the end you get what you pay for.

btw, I'm no home depot fan but I hate to see you make the same mistake I did. A buddy of mine showed me the flip-top more than 10 years ago and in hindsight I wish I'd listened to him instead of but more of the cheap ones.
 
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