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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Intro and Preparing the Back Slats

I've always loved the Adironack Chair. Some of my fondest memories are sitting in one and relaxing with a cold drink, watching the sunset when it's the perfect temperature, with just a hint of a soft breeze. So when a few years back when my wife and I bought our first house, we needed the perfect Adirondack chair for the backyard. One that was comfortable, but not too low to the ground. One that didn't feel like you were too reclined.

I looked high and low for the perfect chair. Any time I saw one, no matter where we were, I would always stop to test it out. Until one day I flipped on The New Yankee Workshop. Norm was demonstrating his version of the Adirondack Chair. He explained how he had visited a museum where he borrowed the best features of many styles of Adirondack chairs to arrive at the design of his. It seemed to have all of the features I was interested in.

I bought the plan, and thus began my first woodworking project. I literally had no experience with woodworking at all. Other than hanging pictures in the house, and dabbling in installing base molding, I had no idea what I was doing. When I received the plans for the chair, it looked extremely intimidating. I had no idea where I wood by the lumber for such a project, let alone where to purchase it. However, a good friend of mine lent me his time, and experience (and his shop) and we built that chair! It was everything I'd expected it would be. I built it of Sepele Mahogany for my wife, and it came out just beautifully.

There is only one bad part. I only built one of them. So this blog will be dedicated to the process of building a second matching chair, along with a small side table.

I started the build process already. We purchased the Sepele Mahogany for the chair and table. I've rough cut the lumber to approximate size for the chair components, so forgive me if I'm not starting at the absolute beginning.

My shop (if you can call it a shop yet), does not have all of the tools that are required to get the stock down to size and thickness. I am still relying on my friend John T. for that. I don't own a table saw, jointer, or surface planer. We get together every month for a shop day, and that's where I get the lumber down to size. Thanks Johnny!

We pick up this story with the chair slats completed. And some of the back seat slats were dimensioned correctly in our last monthly meeting, so I was able to use my bandsaw to cut the shapes of the back slats.

With the first chair, we made templates of the chair components out of hardboard, so you'll be seeing those throughout.

So here is one of the templates and the seat slat before using a 3/4" templating bit with the Bosch Colt. The Colt is quickly becoming one of my favorite tools. Easy to maneuver, lightweight. It's the best.



Next, I clamp the template in place and routed the curves of the slats. You can see the bit of the curve left proud of the line on the bandsaw.



The same technique on the center rear seat slat.





Once the slats were trimmed to the exact curve given by the template, I used a 1/4" roundover bit to round over the front side of the seat slate. I used bench cookies when routing the long runs on the seat slats, but I honestly felt I needed a more stable surface than the cookies when rounding over the curves. A couple fo clamps for that.



Here are the slats after rounding over.



Here are all the slats I've done so far. One is missing. It still needs to go through the surface planer.



So thus far, I have the back seat slats completed (sans 1) and the seat slats.


I clamped them together to prevent twisting, and also to keep them safe in the garage.


Next time it's surface planing, jointing, and ripping all parts down to size.
 

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Intro and Preparing the Back Slats

I've always loved the Adironack Chair. Some of my fondest memories are sitting in one and relaxing with a cold drink, watching the sunset when it's the perfect temperature, with just a hint of a soft breeze. So when a few years back when my wife and I bought our first house, we needed the perfect Adirondack chair for the backyard. One that was comfortable, but not too low to the ground. One that didn't feel like you were too reclined.

I looked high and low for the perfect chair. Any time I saw one, no matter where we were, I would always stop to test it out. Until one day I flipped on The New Yankee Workshop. Norm was demonstrating his version of the Adirondack Chair. He explained how he had visited a museum where he borrowed the best features of many styles of Adirondack chairs to arrive at the design of his. It seemed to have all of the features I was interested in.

I bought the plan, and thus began my first woodworking project. I literally had no experience with woodworking at all. Other than hanging pictures in the house, and dabbling in installing base molding, I had no idea what I was doing. When I received the plans for the chair, it looked extremely intimidating. I had no idea where I wood by the lumber for such a project, let alone where to purchase it. However, a good friend of mine lent me his time, and experience (and his shop) and we built that chair! It was everything I'd expected it would be. I built it of Sepele Mahogany for my wife, and it came out just beautifully.

There is only one bad part. I only built one of them. So this blog will be dedicated to the process of building a second matching chair, along with a small side table.

I started the build process already. We purchased the Sepele Mahogany for the chair and table. I've rough cut the lumber to approximate size for the chair components, so forgive me if I'm not starting at the absolute beginning.

My shop (if you can call it a shop yet), does not have all of the tools that are required to get the stock down to size and thickness. I am still relying on my friend John T. for that. I don't own a table saw, jointer, or surface planer. We get together every month for a shop day, and that's where I get the lumber down to size. Thanks Johnny!

We pick up this story with the chair slats completed. And some of the back seat slats were dimensioned correctly in our last monthly meeting, so I was able to use my bandsaw to cut the shapes of the back slats.

With the first chair, we made templates of the chair components out of hardboard, so you'll be seeing those throughout.

So here is one of the templates and the seat slat before using a 3/4" templating bit with the Bosch Colt. The Colt is quickly becoming one of my favorite tools. Easy to maneuver, lightweight. It's the best.



Next, I clamp the template in place and routed the curves of the slats. You can see the bit of the curve left proud of the line on the bandsaw.



The same technique on the center rear seat slat.





Once the slats were trimmed to the exact curve given by the template, I used a 1/4" roundover bit to round over the front side of the seat slate. I used bench cookies when routing the long runs on the seat slats, but I honestly felt I needed a more stable surface than the cookies when rounding over the curves. A couple fo clamps for that.



Here are the slats after rounding over.



Here are all the slats I've done so far. One is missing. It still needs to go through the surface planer.



So thus far, I have the back seat slats completed (sans 1) and the seat slats.


I clamped them together to prevent twisting, and also to keep them safe in the garage.


Next time it's surface planing, jointing, and ripping all parts down to size.
Sounds good how about a photo of the chair before you start the table?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Intro and Preparing the Back Slats

I've always loved the Adironack Chair. Some of my fondest memories are sitting in one and relaxing with a cold drink, watching the sunset when it's the perfect temperature, with just a hint of a soft breeze. So when a few years back when my wife and I bought our first house, we needed the perfect Adirondack chair for the backyard. One that was comfortable, but not too low to the ground. One that didn't feel like you were too reclined.

I looked high and low for the perfect chair. Any time I saw one, no matter where we were, I would always stop to test it out. Until one day I flipped on The New Yankee Workshop. Norm was demonstrating his version of the Adirondack Chair. He explained how he had visited a museum where he borrowed the best features of many styles of Adirondack chairs to arrive at the design of his. It seemed to have all of the features I was interested in.

I bought the plan, and thus began my first woodworking project. I literally had no experience with woodworking at all. Other than hanging pictures in the house, and dabbling in installing base molding, I had no idea what I was doing. When I received the plans for the chair, it looked extremely intimidating. I had no idea where I wood by the lumber for such a project, let alone where to purchase it. However, a good friend of mine lent me his time, and experience (and his shop) and we built that chair! It was everything I'd expected it would be. I built it of Sepele Mahogany for my wife, and it came out just beautifully.

There is only one bad part. I only built one of them. So this blog will be dedicated to the process of building a second matching chair, along with a small side table.

I started the build process already. We purchased the Sepele Mahogany for the chair and table. I've rough cut the lumber to approximate size for the chair components, so forgive me if I'm not starting at the absolute beginning.

My shop (if you can call it a shop yet), does not have all of the tools that are required to get the stock down to size and thickness. I am still relying on my friend John T. for that. I don't own a table saw, jointer, or surface planer. We get together every month for a shop day, and that's where I get the lumber down to size. Thanks Johnny!

We pick up this story with the chair slats completed. And some of the back seat slats were dimensioned correctly in our last monthly meeting, so I was able to use my bandsaw to cut the shapes of the back slats.

With the first chair, we made templates of the chair components out of hardboard, so you'll be seeing those throughout.

So here is one of the templates and the seat slat before using a 3/4" templating bit with the Bosch Colt. The Colt is quickly becoming one of my favorite tools. Easy to maneuver, lightweight. It's the best.



Next, I clamp the template in place and routed the curves of the slats. You can see the bit of the curve left proud of the line on the bandsaw.



The same technique on the center rear seat slat.





Once the slats were trimmed to the exact curve given by the template, I used a 1/4" roundover bit to round over the front side of the seat slate. I used bench cookies when routing the long runs on the seat slats, but I honestly felt I needed a more stable surface than the cookies when rounding over the curves. A couple fo clamps for that.



Here are the slats after rounding over.



Here are all the slats I've done so far. One is missing. It still needs to go through the surface planer.



So thus far, I have the back seat slats completed (sans 1) and the seat slats.


I clamped them together to prevent twisting, and also to keep them safe in the garage.


Next time it's surface planing, jointing, and ripping all parts down to size.
Jim. I'm going to post the progress of the chair and table as I build it. Do you think I should post the 1st chair I made here as well?
 

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Intro and Preparing the Back Slats

I've always loved the Adironack Chair. Some of my fondest memories are sitting in one and relaxing with a cold drink, watching the sunset when it's the perfect temperature, with just a hint of a soft breeze. So when a few years back when my wife and I bought our first house, we needed the perfect Adirondack chair for the backyard. One that was comfortable, but not too low to the ground. One that didn't feel like you were too reclined.

I looked high and low for the perfect chair. Any time I saw one, no matter where we were, I would always stop to test it out. Until one day I flipped on The New Yankee Workshop. Norm was demonstrating his version of the Adirondack Chair. He explained how he had visited a museum where he borrowed the best features of many styles of Adirondack chairs to arrive at the design of his. It seemed to have all of the features I was interested in.

I bought the plan, and thus began my first woodworking project. I literally had no experience with woodworking at all. Other than hanging pictures in the house, and dabbling in installing base molding, I had no idea what I was doing. When I received the plans for the chair, it looked extremely intimidating. I had no idea where I wood by the lumber for such a project, let alone where to purchase it. However, a good friend of mine lent me his time, and experience (and his shop) and we built that chair! It was everything I'd expected it would be. I built it of Sepele Mahogany for my wife, and it came out just beautifully.

There is only one bad part. I only built one of them. So this blog will be dedicated to the process of building a second matching chair, along with a small side table.

I started the build process already. We purchased the Sepele Mahogany for the chair and table. I've rough cut the lumber to approximate size for the chair components, so forgive me if I'm not starting at the absolute beginning.

My shop (if you can call it a shop yet), does not have all of the tools that are required to get the stock down to size and thickness. I am still relying on my friend John T. for that. I don't own a table saw, jointer, or surface planer. We get together every month for a shop day, and that's where I get the lumber down to size. Thanks Johnny!

We pick up this story with the chair slats completed. And some of the back seat slats were dimensioned correctly in our last monthly meeting, so I was able to use my bandsaw to cut the shapes of the back slats.

With the first chair, we made templates of the chair components out of hardboard, so you'll be seeing those throughout.

So here is one of the templates and the seat slat before using a 3/4" templating bit with the Bosch Colt. The Colt is quickly becoming one of my favorite tools. Easy to maneuver, lightweight. It's the best.



Next, I clamp the template in place and routed the curves of the slats. You can see the bit of the curve left proud of the line on the bandsaw.



The same technique on the center rear seat slat.





Once the slats were trimmed to the exact curve given by the template, I used a 1/4" roundover bit to round over the front side of the seat slate. I used bench cookies when routing the long runs on the seat slats, but I honestly felt I needed a more stable surface than the cookies when rounding over the curves. A couple fo clamps for that.



Here are the slats after rounding over.



Here are all the slats I've done so far. One is missing. It still needs to go through the surface planer.



So thus far, I have the back seat slats completed (sans 1) and the seat slats.


I clamped them together to prevent twisting, and also to keep them safe in the garage.


Next time it's surface planing, jointing, and ripping all parts down to size.
Hey J
I was not saying it was a must to post photos , just a suggestion. Looks like a great project lots good info so far.
 

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Intro and Preparing the Back Slats

I've always loved the Adironack Chair. Some of my fondest memories are sitting in one and relaxing with a cold drink, watching the sunset when it's the perfect temperature, with just a hint of a soft breeze. So when a few years back when my wife and I bought our first house, we needed the perfect Adirondack chair for the backyard. One that was comfortable, but not too low to the ground. One that didn't feel like you were too reclined.

I looked high and low for the perfect chair. Any time I saw one, no matter where we were, I would always stop to test it out. Until one day I flipped on The New Yankee Workshop. Norm was demonstrating his version of the Adirondack Chair. He explained how he had visited a museum where he borrowed the best features of many styles of Adirondack chairs to arrive at the design of his. It seemed to have all of the features I was interested in.

I bought the plan, and thus began my first woodworking project. I literally had no experience with woodworking at all. Other than hanging pictures in the house, and dabbling in installing base molding, I had no idea what I was doing. When I received the plans for the chair, it looked extremely intimidating. I had no idea where I wood by the lumber for such a project, let alone where to purchase it. However, a good friend of mine lent me his time, and experience (and his shop) and we built that chair! It was everything I'd expected it would be. I built it of Sepele Mahogany for my wife, and it came out just beautifully.

There is only one bad part. I only built one of them. So this blog will be dedicated to the process of building a second matching chair, along with a small side table.

I started the build process already. We purchased the Sepele Mahogany for the chair and table. I've rough cut the lumber to approximate size for the chair components, so forgive me if I'm not starting at the absolute beginning.

My shop (if you can call it a shop yet), does not have all of the tools that are required to get the stock down to size and thickness. I am still relying on my friend John T. for that. I don't own a table saw, jointer, or surface planer. We get together every month for a shop day, and that's where I get the lumber down to size. Thanks Johnny!

We pick up this story with the chair slats completed. And some of the back seat slats were dimensioned correctly in our last monthly meeting, so I was able to use my bandsaw to cut the shapes of the back slats.

With the first chair, we made templates of the chair components out of hardboard, so you'll be seeing those throughout.

So here is one of the templates and the seat slat before using a 3/4" templating bit with the Bosch Colt. The Colt is quickly becoming one of my favorite tools. Easy to maneuver, lightweight. It's the best.



Next, I clamp the template in place and routed the curves of the slats. You can see the bit of the curve left proud of the line on the bandsaw.



The same technique on the center rear seat slat.





Once the slats were trimmed to the exact curve given by the template, I used a 1/4" roundover bit to round over the front side of the seat slate. I used bench cookies when routing the long runs on the seat slats, but I honestly felt I needed a more stable surface than the cookies when rounding over the curves. A couple fo clamps for that.



Here are the slats after rounding over.



Here are all the slats I've done so far. One is missing. It still needs to go through the surface planer.



So thus far, I have the back seat slats completed (sans 1) and the seat slats.


I clamped them together to prevent twisting, and also to keep them safe in the garage.


Next time it's surface planing, jointing, and ripping all parts down to size.
Hey J,

I see you have the shark steam mop in the back ground. How will that be used for this project ;)

You should post the first chair so every one can see what the end result will be.
Great blog, lloking forward to the next entry.
 
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Intro and Preparing the Back Slats

I've always loved the Adironack Chair. Some of my fondest memories are sitting in one and relaxing with a cold drink, watching the sunset when it's the perfect temperature, with just a hint of a soft breeze. So when a few years back when my wife and I bought our first house, we needed the perfect Adirondack chair for the backyard. One that was comfortable, but not too low to the ground. One that didn't feel like you were too reclined.

I looked high and low for the perfect chair. Any time I saw one, no matter where we were, I would always stop to test it out. Until one day I flipped on The New Yankee Workshop. Norm was demonstrating his version of the Adirondack Chair. He explained how he had visited a museum where he borrowed the best features of many styles of Adirondack chairs to arrive at the design of his. It seemed to have all of the features I was interested in.

I bought the plan, and thus began my first woodworking project. I literally had no experience with woodworking at all. Other than hanging pictures in the house, and dabbling in installing base molding, I had no idea what I was doing. When I received the plans for the chair, it looked extremely intimidating. I had no idea where I wood by the lumber for such a project, let alone where to purchase it. However, a good friend of mine lent me his time, and experience (and his shop) and we built that chair! It was everything I'd expected it would be. I built it of Sepele Mahogany for my wife, and it came out just beautifully.

There is only one bad part. I only built one of them. So this blog will be dedicated to the process of building a second matching chair, along with a small side table.

I started the build process already. We purchased the Sepele Mahogany for the chair and table. I've rough cut the lumber to approximate size for the chair components, so forgive me if I'm not starting at the absolute beginning.

My shop (if you can call it a shop yet), does not have all of the tools that are required to get the stock down to size and thickness. I am still relying on my friend John T. for that. I don't own a table saw, jointer, or surface planer. We get together every month for a shop day, and that's where I get the lumber down to size. Thanks Johnny!

We pick up this story with the chair slats completed. And some of the back seat slats were dimensioned correctly in our last monthly meeting, so I was able to use my bandsaw to cut the shapes of the back slats.

With the first chair, we made templates of the chair components out of hardboard, so you'll be seeing those throughout.

So here is one of the templates and the seat slat before using a 3/4" templating bit with the Bosch Colt. The Colt is quickly becoming one of my favorite tools. Easy to maneuver, lightweight. It's the best.



Next, I clamp the template in place and routed the curves of the slats. You can see the bit of the curve left proud of the line on the bandsaw.



The same technique on the center rear seat slat.





Once the slats were trimmed to the exact curve given by the template, I used a 1/4" roundover bit to round over the front side of the seat slate. I used bench cookies when routing the long runs on the seat slats, but I honestly felt I needed a more stable surface than the cookies when rounding over the curves. A couple fo clamps for that.



Here are the slats after rounding over.



Here are all the slats I've done so far. One is missing. It still needs to go through the surface planer.



So thus far, I have the back seat slats completed (sans 1) and the seat slats.


I clamped them together to prevent twisting, and also to keep them safe in the garage.


Next time it's surface planing, jointing, and ripping all parts down to size.
Nice start!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Intro and Preparing the Back Slats

I've always loved the Adironack Chair. Some of my fondest memories are sitting in one and relaxing with a cold drink, watching the sunset when it's the perfect temperature, with just a hint of a soft breeze. So when a few years back when my wife and I bought our first house, we needed the perfect Adirondack chair for the backyard. One that was comfortable, but not too low to the ground. One that didn't feel like you were too reclined.

I looked high and low for the perfect chair. Any time I saw one, no matter where we were, I would always stop to test it out. Until one day I flipped on The New Yankee Workshop. Norm was demonstrating his version of the Adirondack Chair. He explained how he had visited a museum where he borrowed the best features of many styles of Adirondack chairs to arrive at the design of his. It seemed to have all of the features I was interested in.

I bought the plan, and thus began my first woodworking project. I literally had no experience with woodworking at all. Other than hanging pictures in the house, and dabbling in installing base molding, I had no idea what I was doing. When I received the plans for the chair, it looked extremely intimidating. I had no idea where I wood by the lumber for such a project, let alone where to purchase it. However, a good friend of mine lent me his time, and experience (and his shop) and we built that chair! It was everything I'd expected it would be. I built it of Sepele Mahogany for my wife, and it came out just beautifully.

There is only one bad part. I only built one of them. So this blog will be dedicated to the process of building a second matching chair, along with a small side table.

I started the build process already. We purchased the Sepele Mahogany for the chair and table. I've rough cut the lumber to approximate size for the chair components, so forgive me if I'm not starting at the absolute beginning.

My shop (if you can call it a shop yet), does not have all of the tools that are required to get the stock down to size and thickness. I am still relying on my friend John T. for that. I don't own a table saw, jointer, or surface planer. We get together every month for a shop day, and that's where I get the lumber down to size. Thanks Johnny!

We pick up this story with the chair slats completed. And some of the back seat slats were dimensioned correctly in our last monthly meeting, so I was able to use my bandsaw to cut the shapes of the back slats.

With the first chair, we made templates of the chair components out of hardboard, so you'll be seeing those throughout.

So here is one of the templates and the seat slat before using a 3/4" templating bit with the Bosch Colt. The Colt is quickly becoming one of my favorite tools. Easy to maneuver, lightweight. It's the best.



Next, I clamp the template in place and routed the curves of the slats. You can see the bit of the curve left proud of the line on the bandsaw.



The same technique on the center rear seat slat.





Once the slats were trimmed to the exact curve given by the template, I used a 1/4" roundover bit to round over the front side of the seat slate. I used bench cookies when routing the long runs on the seat slats, but I honestly felt I needed a more stable surface than the cookies when rounding over the curves. A couple fo clamps for that.



Here are the slats after rounding over.



Here are all the slats I've done so far. One is missing. It still needs to go through the surface planer.



So thus far, I have the back seat slats completed (sans 1) and the seat slats.


I clamped them together to prevent twisting, and also to keep them safe in the garage.


Next time it's surface planing, jointing, and ripping all parts down to size.
Johnny. I will do that. I will post the first chair as a project and reference it in the next blog. Thanks for reading. Cannot wait to see some of your stuff up there. As for the Shark steam mop, it needs to find a new home….when the garage finally becomes a shop.
 

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Intro and Preparing the Back Slats

I've always loved the Adironack Chair. Some of my fondest memories are sitting in one and relaxing with a cold drink, watching the sunset when it's the perfect temperature, with just a hint of a soft breeze. So when a few years back when my wife and I bought our first house, we needed the perfect Adirondack chair for the backyard. One that was comfortable, but not too low to the ground. One that didn't feel like you were too reclined.

I looked high and low for the perfect chair. Any time I saw one, no matter where we were, I would always stop to test it out. Until one day I flipped on The New Yankee Workshop. Norm was demonstrating his version of the Adirondack Chair. He explained how he had visited a museum where he borrowed the best features of many styles of Adirondack chairs to arrive at the design of his. It seemed to have all of the features I was interested in.

I bought the plan, and thus began my first woodworking project. I literally had no experience with woodworking at all. Other than hanging pictures in the house, and dabbling in installing base molding, I had no idea what I was doing. When I received the plans for the chair, it looked extremely intimidating. I had no idea where I wood by the lumber for such a project, let alone where to purchase it. However, a good friend of mine lent me his time, and experience (and his shop) and we built that chair! It was everything I'd expected it would be. I built it of Sepele Mahogany for my wife, and it came out just beautifully.

There is only one bad part. I only built one of them. So this blog will be dedicated to the process of building a second matching chair, along with a small side table.

I started the build process already. We purchased the Sepele Mahogany for the chair and table. I've rough cut the lumber to approximate size for the chair components, so forgive me if I'm not starting at the absolute beginning.

My shop (if you can call it a shop yet), does not have all of the tools that are required to get the stock down to size and thickness. I am still relying on my friend John T. for that. I don't own a table saw, jointer, or surface planer. We get together every month for a shop day, and that's where I get the lumber down to size. Thanks Johnny!

We pick up this story with the chair slats completed. And some of the back seat slats were dimensioned correctly in our last monthly meeting, so I was able to use my bandsaw to cut the shapes of the back slats.

With the first chair, we made templates of the chair components out of hardboard, so you'll be seeing those throughout.

So here is one of the templates and the seat slat before using a 3/4" templating bit with the Bosch Colt. The Colt is quickly becoming one of my favorite tools. Easy to maneuver, lightweight. It's the best.



Next, I clamp the template in place and routed the curves of the slats. You can see the bit of the curve left proud of the line on the bandsaw.



The same technique on the center rear seat slat.





Once the slats were trimmed to the exact curve given by the template, I used a 1/4" roundover bit to round over the front side of the seat slate. I used bench cookies when routing the long runs on the seat slats, but I honestly felt I needed a more stable surface than the cookies when rounding over the curves. A couple fo clamps for that.



Here are the slats after rounding over.



Here are all the slats I've done so far. One is missing. It still needs to go through the surface planer.



So thus far, I have the back seat slats completed (sans 1) and the seat slats.


I clamped them together to prevent twisting, and also to keep them safe in the garage.


Next time it's surface planing, jointing, and ripping all parts down to size.
Nice, Ditto for me on the…...when the garage finally becomes a shop, not a dumping ground. I have to get a bigger place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I Love the Smell of Mahogany in the Morning

After receiving about 20 inches of snow last week, this weekend brought heavy rain and warmer temperatures to the NY metro area. And there was enough rain to wash almost every trace of snow away. Today, I took the trip down to my friend John's to get some more work done on the chair. John has the Jointer, the Surface Planer, and the Table Saw that I am sorely missing in my lame excuse for a shop. But, it's a great excuse to get together and have some dedicated shop time.

We had a big day planned. A lot of Jointing, planing, ripping and cross-cutting would fill the air with the sweet smell of Mahogany. And the 50+ degree temps made for a very enjoyable day.

First, we flipped on the Jointer, and jointed one edge of the rough boards. This would give a good edge to rip the boards to width on the table saw later.



Then, off to the surface planer to get the stock down to 1" and 3/4". John's Ridgid surface planer is excellent and up to the task. I hope to purchase one by the end of the year.



With the 2 of us, we were able to quickly crank through the planing. One feeding and the other catching. Here is some of the stack.



Once the boards were planed to thickness, we moved to the tablesaw to rip the boards to width. Again, what an advantage having 2 people. One feeding and one catching at the other end. It goes very quickly.



Next comes the fun part. We get to use the hardboard templates that we made while building a chair last year. Here we are laying out the arms.



Then it was off to the bandsaw to rough cut the curved components of the chair. We cut these components to rough size and then will come back later with a templating bit to make the exact final shapes.



I had to throw in a picture of John. The arm that he cut was a lot better than mine. He's been at it longer than I have, but perhaps I'll get as good as he is some day.



Here are the arms after cutting on the bandsaw. This time, we saved cutoffs (show on top of each arm) from each of the arms so that when we plug the holes, we'll hopefully get a pretty good match. Especially since the grain on these arms is so wavy.



The upper rear cross support is the trickiest cut on this chair. It requires a curved cut that also has a 30 degree bevel, as you can see here.



No matter how careful you cut this curve on the bandsaw, there are little humps and bumps along the entire surface of the curve. Now, when Norm does it on the video, he's got a souped up drum sander to smooth out the curve. We're not so lucky. The last time we attempted this with an orbital sander. I remember it took a while to get it right. This time, John suggested we try a spokeshave.

It worked very well. It was the first time I'd ever used one. What a great little tool.



Very little sanding will be required in the final assembly thanks to this. I've gotta pick up one of these.



Another compound curve required for this chair is the lower back support, which requires a 6 degree bevel angle. This cut is a challenge because the waste side isn't waste at all. It actually forms the rear-most seat slat, so there's no room for error.

Here, I'm using the template to lay out the cut.



And here is the result…not too bad.



A few passes with the spokeshave, and it's off to assembly next time.

 

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I Love the Smell of Mahogany in the Morning

After receiving about 20 inches of snow last week, this weekend brought heavy rain and warmer temperatures to the NY metro area. And there was enough rain to wash almost every trace of snow away. Today, I took the trip down to my friend John's to get some more work done on the chair. John has the Jointer, the Surface Planer, and the Table Saw that I am sorely missing in my lame excuse for a shop. But, it's a great excuse to get together and have some dedicated shop time.

We had a big day planned. A lot of Jointing, planing, ripping and cross-cutting would fill the air with the sweet smell of Mahogany. And the 50+ degree temps made for a very enjoyable day.

First, we flipped on the Jointer, and jointed one edge of the rough boards. This would give a good edge to rip the boards to width on the table saw later.



Then, off to the surface planer to get the stock down to 1" and 3/4". John's Ridgid surface planer is excellent and up to the task. I hope to purchase one by the end of the year.



With the 2 of us, we were able to quickly crank through the planing. One feeding and the other catching. Here is some of the stack.



Once the boards were planed to thickness, we moved to the tablesaw to rip the boards to width. Again, what an advantage having 2 people. One feeding and one catching at the other end. It goes very quickly.



Next comes the fun part. We get to use the hardboard templates that we made while building a chair last year. Here we are laying out the arms.



Then it was off to the bandsaw to rough cut the curved components of the chair. We cut these components to rough size and then will come back later with a templating bit to make the exact final shapes.



I had to throw in a picture of John. The arm that he cut was a lot better than mine. He's been at it longer than I have, but perhaps I'll get as good as he is some day.



Here are the arms after cutting on the bandsaw. This time, we saved cutoffs (show on top of each arm) from each of the arms so that when we plug the holes, we'll hopefully get a pretty good match. Especially since the grain on these arms is so wavy.



The upper rear cross support is the trickiest cut on this chair. It requires a curved cut that also has a 30 degree bevel, as you can see here.



No matter how careful you cut this curve on the bandsaw, there are little humps and bumps along the entire surface of the curve. Now, when Norm does it on the video, he's got a souped up drum sander to smooth out the curve. We're not so lucky. The last time we attempted this with an orbital sander. I remember it took a while to get it right. This time, John suggested we try a spokeshave.

It worked very well. It was the first time I'd ever used one. What a great little tool.



Very little sanding will be required in the final assembly thanks to this. I've gotta pick up one of these.



Another compound curve required for this chair is the lower back support, which requires a 6 degree bevel angle. This cut is a challenge because the waste side isn't waste at all. It actually forms the rear-most seat slat, so there's no room for error.

Here, I'm using the template to lay out the cut.



And here is the result…not too bad.



A few passes with the spokeshave, and it's off to assembly next time.

Great second installment to the first. I am looking forward to seeing the end results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Not So Fast

The last time, I thought I was ready to begin assembling. However, I still had more bandsawing and routing to do. I still needed to rought cut the side members, and then put all of the band-sawn pieces back on the templates to get them smooth and exact.

So it's 1/1/2010. Happy New Year! Spent the morning cleaning up after the New Year's party, and then it was out into the garage. Luckily, the weather was not that bad. A balmy 40 degrees, more than good enough to open the garage door. That's the double snow tube we used last week after the 20" blizzard. I don't know if I should deflate it, or leave it inflated until the next snow? Hopefully?



I set up the chop saw and cut the 24 degree angle on each side member.



Then, off to the band saw to rough cut them down to approximate shape. I got the chance to use the new snake lamp for the bandsaw that I got for Christmas. What a difference a direct light source works. Felt like it was much easier.



The chair also has small brackets under the arms, so I took care of these as well.



I then put the rough-cut components back on the templates to get the exact shape. I found myself reaching again for the Bosch Colt instead of the standard Porter Cable router. The templating bit for the Bosch worked wonderfully. It just feels like you have so much more control with it.



Here's one of the brackets after running the template bit.



I'm finally finished with all of the routing and all of the components for the chair and table are cut to size. There's some round over work on the table left for next time. I might do some light sanding. Then…finally I can start assembly. I might even get the time this weekend. I hope.
 

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Not So Fast

The last time, I thought I was ready to begin assembling. However, I still had more bandsawing and routing to do. I still needed to rought cut the side members, and then put all of the band-sawn pieces back on the templates to get them smooth and exact.

So it's 1/1/2010. Happy New Year! Spent the morning cleaning up after the New Year's party, and then it was out into the garage. Luckily, the weather was not that bad. A balmy 40 degrees, more than good enough to open the garage door. That's the double snow tube we used last week after the 20" blizzard. I don't know if I should deflate it, or leave it inflated until the next snow? Hopefully?



I set up the chop saw and cut the 24 degree angle on each side member.



Then, off to the band saw to rough cut them down to approximate shape. I got the chance to use the new snake lamp for the bandsaw that I got for Christmas. What a difference a direct light source works. Felt like it was much easier.



The chair also has small brackets under the arms, so I took care of these as well.



I then put the rough-cut components back on the templates to get the exact shape. I found myself reaching again for the Bosch Colt instead of the standard Porter Cable router. The templating bit for the Bosch worked wonderfully. It just feels like you have so much more control with it.



Here's one of the brackets after running the template bit.



I'm finally finished with all of the routing and all of the components for the chair and table are cut to size. There's some round over work on the table left for next time. I might do some light sanding. Then…finally I can start assembly. I might even get the time this weekend. I hope.
Hey John,
Nice work, it looks like you got a lot done. How did you have any time after cleaning up from a New Years Party.

Looks like you are on the cusp of assembly!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Not So Fast

The last time, I thought I was ready to begin assembling. However, I still had more bandsawing and routing to do. I still needed to rought cut the side members, and then put all of the band-sawn pieces back on the templates to get them smooth and exact.

So it's 1/1/2010. Happy New Year! Spent the morning cleaning up after the New Year's party, and then it was out into the garage. Luckily, the weather was not that bad. A balmy 40 degrees, more than good enough to open the garage door. That's the double snow tube we used last week after the 20" blizzard. I don't know if I should deflate it, or leave it inflated until the next snow? Hopefully?



I set up the chop saw and cut the 24 degree angle on each side member.



Then, off to the band saw to rough cut them down to approximate shape. I got the chance to use the new snake lamp for the bandsaw that I got for Christmas. What a difference a direct light source works. Felt like it was much easier.



The chair also has small brackets under the arms, so I took care of these as well.



I then put the rough-cut components back on the templates to get the exact shape. I found myself reaching again for the Bosch Colt instead of the standard Porter Cable router. The templating bit for the Bosch worked wonderfully. It just feels like you have so much more control with it.



Here's one of the brackets after running the template bit.



I'm finally finished with all of the routing and all of the components for the chair and table are cut to size. There's some round over work on the table left for next time. I might do some light sanding. Then…finally I can start assembly. I might even get the time this weekend. I hope.
John. I woke up with a purpose and knocked the whole house out because I knew I wanted to have some time in the afternoon. Also, the kids went across the street for the afternoon with friends, so that didn't hurt. Yes. I'm close to assembly. I noticed I have some roundover work to do for the table. Other than that it's time to start puting together. CAn't wait to get it done so we can move on to the bench. BTW, what size star drive screws should I use for the buddy? The assorted pack is 25.00 and I might just order the size I need.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Leg Assembly...Finally

It was cold in the garage this weekend. But I was determined to get the assembly of the chair off the ground. Since assembly involved glue up, I tried to keep the temperature up with a small space heater. So I brought a small digital thermometer with me. Temperature outside - 21 degrees; Starting garage temperature - 32 degrees; average temperature with the space heater - 47 degrees. Just high enough for the TiteBond III recommended temperature of 45 degrees.

I've gotta get some other source of heat in there. Can't glue the chair indoors because it's too big. Can anyone out there recommend a good way to heat the garage? It doesn't need to be tropical, but I'd take 50-55 degrees in a second.

Ok. So here we go. The first assembly is the side members with the fron and rear cross-piece. The rear cross-piece is the curved piece.



I drill and countersunk 1 5/8" stainless steel square drive screws purchased from McFeely's. These are great screws, however they're a bit soft. I actually snapped the head of one of them off during this part of the assembly. No worries though, I backed the rest out and got it free. You must ensure that the pilot holes are deep and wide enough. I'm using the square to ensure my drilling is straight.



Next is the assembly of the front cross piece. The most difficult part is trying to clamp align the components flush with nothing more than a Workmate! Did I mention I'm building a real workbench next?





On to the front legs of the chair. The front legs are attached with 1/4" carriage bolts. Here I'm showing the measurement and marking for the bolts according to the plan. I used the Starrett spring-loaded ceter punch to provide a decent size hole to begin drilling for the carriage bolts.



After getting the first leg on, I got a visit from my youngest Julia, who is always inquisitive about what I'm doing and ready to lend a hand.



For the carriage bolts, Norm recommends stainless, but I'm using silicon bronze, which I think look really nice on the mahogany as the chair weathers.





So here a a few different shots of the chair as is stands today. Next time, arms and perhaps back slats?





 

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Leg Assembly...Finally

It was cold in the garage this weekend. But I was determined to get the assembly of the chair off the ground. Since assembly involved glue up, I tried to keep the temperature up with a small space heater. So I brought a small digital thermometer with me. Temperature outside - 21 degrees; Starting garage temperature - 32 degrees; average temperature with the space heater - 47 degrees. Just high enough for the TiteBond III recommended temperature of 45 degrees.

I've gotta get some other source of heat in there. Can't glue the chair indoors because it's too big. Can anyone out there recommend a good way to heat the garage? It doesn't need to be tropical, but I'd take 50-55 degrees in a second.

Ok. So here we go. The first assembly is the side members with the fron and rear cross-piece. The rear cross-piece is the curved piece.



I drill and countersunk 1 5/8" stainless steel square drive screws purchased from McFeely's. These are great screws, however they're a bit soft. I actually snapped the head of one of them off during this part of the assembly. No worries though, I backed the rest out and got it free. You must ensure that the pilot holes are deep and wide enough. I'm using the square to ensure my drilling is straight.



Next is the assembly of the front cross piece. The most difficult part is trying to clamp align the components flush with nothing more than a Workmate! Did I mention I'm building a real workbench next?





On to the front legs of the chair. The front legs are attached with 1/4" carriage bolts. Here I'm showing the measurement and marking for the bolts according to the plan. I used the Starrett spring-loaded ceter punch to provide a decent size hole to begin drilling for the carriage bolts.



After getting the first leg on, I got a visit from my youngest Julia, who is always inquisitive about what I'm doing and ready to lend a hand.



For the carriage bolts, Norm recommends stainless, but I'm using silicon bronze, which I think look really nice on the mahogany as the chair weathers.





So here a a few different shots of the chair as is stands today. Next time, arms and perhaps back slats?





looks good, I'll be watching this as my wife wants some of these too.
to heat the garage, I'd recommend getting another space heater. Sometimes I use 3. It won't be long (hopefully) and you won't need any…that's what I tell myself anyway
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Leg Assembly...Finally

It was cold in the garage this weekend. But I was determined to get the assembly of the chair off the ground. Since assembly involved glue up, I tried to keep the temperature up with a small space heater. So I brought a small digital thermometer with me. Temperature outside - 21 degrees; Starting garage temperature - 32 degrees; average temperature with the space heater - 47 degrees. Just high enough for the TiteBond III recommended temperature of 45 degrees.

I've gotta get some other source of heat in there. Can't glue the chair indoors because it's too big. Can anyone out there recommend a good way to heat the garage? It doesn't need to be tropical, but I'd take 50-55 degrees in a second.

Ok. So here we go. The first assembly is the side members with the fron and rear cross-piece. The rear cross-piece is the curved piece.



I drill and countersunk 1 5/8" stainless steel square drive screws purchased from McFeely's. These are great screws, however they're a bit soft. I actually snapped the head of one of them off during this part of the assembly. No worries though, I backed the rest out and got it free. You must ensure that the pilot holes are deep and wide enough. I'm using the square to ensure my drilling is straight.



Next is the assembly of the front cross piece. The most difficult part is trying to clamp align the components flush with nothing more than a Workmate! Did I mention I'm building a real workbench next?





On to the front legs of the chair. The front legs are attached with 1/4" carriage bolts. Here I'm showing the measurement and marking for the bolts according to the plan. I used the Starrett spring-loaded ceter punch to provide a decent size hole to begin drilling for the carriage bolts.



After getting the first leg on, I got a visit from my youngest Julia, who is always inquisitive about what I'm doing and ready to lend a hand.



For the carriage bolts, Norm recommends stainless, but I'm using silicon bronze, which I think look really nice on the mahogany as the chair weathers.





So here a a few different shots of the chair as is stands today. Next time, arms and perhaps back slats?





Great D. This is a really great looking chair IMHO. And it's even more comfortable to sit in. I've already built one. I'd post it on projects, but I'd hate to spoil the surprise. I'm also doing the table to match as part of this blog.
 

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Leg Assembly...Finally

It was cold in the garage this weekend. But I was determined to get the assembly of the chair off the ground. Since assembly involved glue up, I tried to keep the temperature up with a small space heater. So I brought a small digital thermometer with me. Temperature outside - 21 degrees; Starting garage temperature - 32 degrees; average temperature with the space heater - 47 degrees. Just high enough for the TiteBond III recommended temperature of 45 degrees.

I've gotta get some other source of heat in there. Can't glue the chair indoors because it's too big. Can anyone out there recommend a good way to heat the garage? It doesn't need to be tropical, but I'd take 50-55 degrees in a second.

Ok. So here we go. The first assembly is the side members with the fron and rear cross-piece. The rear cross-piece is the curved piece.



I drill and countersunk 1 5/8" stainless steel square drive screws purchased from McFeely's. These are great screws, however they're a bit soft. I actually snapped the head of one of them off during this part of the assembly. No worries though, I backed the rest out and got it free. You must ensure that the pilot holes are deep and wide enough. I'm using the square to ensure my drilling is straight.



Next is the assembly of the front cross piece. The most difficult part is trying to clamp align the components flush with nothing more than a Workmate! Did I mention I'm building a real workbench next?





On to the front legs of the chair. The front legs are attached with 1/4" carriage bolts. Here I'm showing the measurement and marking for the bolts according to the plan. I used the Starrett spring-loaded ceter punch to provide a decent size hole to begin drilling for the carriage bolts.



After getting the first leg on, I got a visit from my youngest Julia, who is always inquisitive about what I'm doing and ready to lend a hand.



For the carriage bolts, Norm recommends stainless, but I'm using silicon bronze, which I think look really nice on the mahogany as the chair weathers.





So here a a few different shots of the chair as is stands today. Next time, arms and perhaps back slats?





Wow you did well. Great progress on the assembly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Brackets and Arms

A wet and rainy day gave me the perfect excuse to get out and work on the chair. I've reached the crucial step in assembly, which is to install the bracket, arms, and upper cross-piece. These pieces need to be installed with care to get the proper proportions for the back slats.

So here we go. First, I installed the brackets which are used to support the arms.



The top gets an 1 5/8" stainless screw, and you have to be careful with the bottom screw. There's not a lot of material left when counterboring for an 1 1/4" screw. I took my time and all went well.



Next it was on to the long awaited arms of the chair. Norm recommends doing the rounding over on the arms after attaching it. I just didnt feel comfortable doing ths because I didn't want to risk putting any weight on the arms. So I did this prior to installing, and I'm glad I did, because I went slightly deep with the 3/8" roundover on one spot on the arm. It was easier to make the adjustments before it was installed. Here are the arms prior to rounding over.



Next comes the fun part. You need to install the arms so that the arm has a 1 1/8" overhang from front leg and 3/4" from the inside of the front leg. So I tried something different. I flippped the chair over, and lined up the arms where the needed to be and traced the leg and bracket outline on the bottom of the arm. From there I drilled a small pilot from the back of the arm so that I know where the holes would be on the top. From here I drilled the counterbore for the screws that will attach the arm to the leg and bracket.



With that completed, I attached the arm to the leg with one screw so that I could make adjustments to each arm such that the width between the arms stays 20 1/2". Once that it done I dry fit the upper rear cross piece (clamped in place) to ensure all was in order.



A front view



Rear view



Top View - It's starting to feel like a chair finally.





My best helper, Julia, came out and was the very first person to sit in the chair. I put one of the seat slats down.



I ran into an issue though. The silicon bronze carriage bolts that I bought are too short for attaching the arms to the upper cross piece. I bought 1/4"- 20- 2", and they do grab about half of the bolt. However, I'm not about to settle for this. I'll need to order the 2 1/2" length. Only issue is the cost. 4 bolts cost $7 from bolt depot, and the shipping is $9. Does anyone know where I can get the bronze bolts for cheaper?

So all and all, a good weekend. The hardest parts are over. Next week it's on to the back slats.
 

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Brackets and Arms

A wet and rainy day gave me the perfect excuse to get out and work on the chair. I've reached the crucial step in assembly, which is to install the bracket, arms, and upper cross-piece. These pieces need to be installed with care to get the proper proportions for the back slats.

So here we go. First, I installed the brackets which are used to support the arms.



The top gets an 1 5/8" stainless screw, and you have to be careful with the bottom screw. There's not a lot of material left when counterboring for an 1 1/4" screw. I took my time and all went well.



Next it was on to the long awaited arms of the chair. Norm recommends doing the rounding over on the arms after attaching it. I just didnt feel comfortable doing ths because I didn't want to risk putting any weight on the arms. So I did this prior to installing, and I'm glad I did, because I went slightly deep with the 3/8" roundover on one spot on the arm. It was easier to make the adjustments before it was installed. Here are the arms prior to rounding over.



Next comes the fun part. You need to install the arms so that the arm has a 1 1/8" overhang from front leg and 3/4" from the inside of the front leg. So I tried something different. I flippped the chair over, and lined up the arms where the needed to be and traced the leg and bracket outline on the bottom of the arm. From there I drilled a small pilot from the back of the arm so that I know where the holes would be on the top. From here I drilled the counterbore for the screws that will attach the arm to the leg and bracket.



With that completed, I attached the arm to the leg with one screw so that I could make adjustments to each arm such that the width between the arms stays 20 1/2". Once that it done I dry fit the upper rear cross piece (clamped in place) to ensure all was in order.



A front view



Rear view



Top View - It's starting to feel like a chair finally.





My best helper, Julia, came out and was the very first person to sit in the chair. I put one of the seat slats down.



I ran into an issue though. The silicon bronze carriage bolts that I bought are too short for attaching the arms to the upper cross piece. I bought 1/4"- 20- 2", and they do grab about half of the bolt. However, I'm not about to settle for this. I'll need to order the 2 1/2" length. Only issue is the cost. 4 bolts cost $7 from bolt depot, and the shipping is $9. Does anyone know where I can get the bronze bolts for cheaper?

So all and all, a good weekend. The hardest parts are over. Next week it's on to the back slats.
Great progress a super looking chair.
 

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Brackets and Arms

A wet and rainy day gave me the perfect excuse to get out and work on the chair. I've reached the crucial step in assembly, which is to install the bracket, arms, and upper cross-piece. These pieces need to be installed with care to get the proper proportions for the back slats.

So here we go. First, I installed the brackets which are used to support the arms.



The top gets an 1 5/8" stainless screw, and you have to be careful with the bottom screw. There's not a lot of material left when counterboring for an 1 1/4" screw. I took my time and all went well.



Next it was on to the long awaited arms of the chair. Norm recommends doing the rounding over on the arms after attaching it. I just didnt feel comfortable doing ths because I didn't want to risk putting any weight on the arms. So I did this prior to installing, and I'm glad I did, because I went slightly deep with the 3/8" roundover on one spot on the arm. It was easier to make the adjustments before it was installed. Here are the arms prior to rounding over.



Next comes the fun part. You need to install the arms so that the arm has a 1 1/8" overhang from front leg and 3/4" from the inside of the front leg. So I tried something different. I flippped the chair over, and lined up the arms where the needed to be and traced the leg and bracket outline on the bottom of the arm. From there I drilled a small pilot from the back of the arm so that I know where the holes would be on the top. From here I drilled the counterbore for the screws that will attach the arm to the leg and bracket.



With that completed, I attached the arm to the leg with one screw so that I could make adjustments to each arm such that the width between the arms stays 20 1/2". Once that it done I dry fit the upper rear cross piece (clamped in place) to ensure all was in order.



A front view



Rear view



Top View - It's starting to feel like a chair finally.





My best helper, Julia, came out and was the very first person to sit in the chair. I put one of the seat slats down.



I ran into an issue though. The silicon bronze carriage bolts that I bought are too short for attaching the arms to the upper cross piece. I bought 1/4"- 20- 2", and they do grab about half of the bolt. However, I'm not about to settle for this. I'll need to order the 2 1/2" length. Only issue is the cost. 4 bolts cost $7 from bolt depot, and the shipping is $9. Does anyone know where I can get the bronze bolts for cheaper?

So all and all, a good weekend. The hardest parts are over. Next week it's on to the back slats.
Looking great. Nice progress.
 
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