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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
building the bases



So my latest project is officially underway. Click Here http://lumberjocks.com/bfd/blog/8062 to see the back story and details. I decide to build from the ground up so I start with the slab legs first.

Here you see one end panel with the heavy duty glides attached and the 3 inner layers of Particle board. The glides are rated for either 1000 or 2000 lbs (either way they should hold!) The layers are glued and screwed together to make a particle board sandwich.





I then attach the other end panel along with the back piece.



Next I mill some 8/4 solid maple leaving it slightly proud of the end panels and glue them in place. Once the glue has cured overnight I come back and plane down the maple until it is flush with the end panels. Once I veneer the sides I will come back and add an additional 1/4" solid maple piece to the front and back giving the look of a solid maple slab. I ordered both my walnut and maple veneer from VeneerSupplies.com and should be receiving that in the next week. Until then I am at a stand still with the legs. The legs prove to have the weight I wanted for stability. the Legs at this point weighs in at 75 lbs a piece!



Here is a picture of the top that I picked up locally.



While I am waiting for my veneer to arrive I decide to mill up my stock for the 4" thick apron.



And then start on the center storage case by cutting the panels that will be veneered in Walnut. Here I have done a quick dry fit and have labeled the parts. I also resaw some walnut to a finished 1/4" thickness that I will use as edging for the case. I also take stock of my other outstanding materials and order the vises and drawer slides from Lee Valley. Hopefully they arrive soon so I can continue work on the top.



Here you can see the current multi purpose bench that will be replaced by the bench I am making. This solved the conundrum of needing a bench to build a bench. It will get reused some where else in my shop.
 

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building the bases



So my latest project is officially underway. Click Here http://lumberjocks.com/bfd/blog/8062 to see the back story and details. I decide to build from the ground up so I start with the slab legs first.

Here you see one end panel with the heavy duty glides attached and the 3 inner layers of Particle board. The glides are rated for either 1000 or 2000 lbs (either way they should hold!) The layers are glued and screwed together to make a particle board sandwich.





I then attach the other end panel along with the back piece.



Next I mill some 8/4 solid maple leaving it slightly proud of the end panels and glue them in place. Once the glue has cured overnight I come back and plane down the maple until it is flush with the end panels. Once I veneer the sides I will come back and add an additional 1/4" solid maple piece to the front and back giving the look of a solid maple slab. I ordered both my walnut and maple veneer from VeneerSupplies.com and should be receiving that in the next week. Until then I am at a stand still with the legs. The legs prove to have the weight I wanted for stability. the Legs at this point weighs in at 75 lbs a piece!



Here is a picture of the top that I picked up locally.



While I am waiting for my veneer to arrive I decide to mill up my stock for the 4" thick apron.



And then start on the center storage case by cutting the panels that will be veneered in Walnut. Here I have done a quick dry fit and have labeled the parts. I also resaw some walnut to a finished 1/4" thickness that I will use as edging for the case. I also take stock of my other outstanding materials and order the vises and drawer slides from Lee Valley. Hopefully they arrive soon so I can continue work on the top.



Here you can see the current multi purpose bench that will be replaced by the bench I am making. This solved the conundrum of needing a bench to build a bench. It will get reused some where else in my shop.
I'm not sure solid is the right word for those legs, Brian. You're gonna need a crane to move that thing around, if you ever decide to.

Looking nice so far.
 

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building the bases



So my latest project is officially underway. Click Here http://lumberjocks.com/bfd/blog/8062 to see the back story and details. I decide to build from the ground up so I start with the slab legs first.

Here you see one end panel with the heavy duty glides attached and the 3 inner layers of Particle board. The glides are rated for either 1000 or 2000 lbs (either way they should hold!) The layers are glued and screwed together to make a particle board sandwich.





I then attach the other end panel along with the back piece.



Next I mill some 8/4 solid maple leaving it slightly proud of the end panels and glue them in place. Once the glue has cured overnight I come back and plane down the maple until it is flush with the end panels. Once I veneer the sides I will come back and add an additional 1/4" solid maple piece to the front and back giving the look of a solid maple slab. I ordered both my walnut and maple veneer from VeneerSupplies.com and should be receiving that in the next week. Until then I am at a stand still with the legs. The legs prove to have the weight I wanted for stability. the Legs at this point weighs in at 75 lbs a piece!



Here is a picture of the top that I picked up locally.



While I am waiting for my veneer to arrive I decide to mill up my stock for the 4" thick apron.



And then start on the center storage case by cutting the panels that will be veneered in Walnut. Here I have done a quick dry fit and have labeled the parts. I also resaw some walnut to a finished 1/4" thickness that I will use as edging for the case. I also take stock of my other outstanding materials and order the vises and drawer slides from Lee Valley. Hopefully they arrive soon so I can continue work on the top.



Here you can see the current multi purpose bench that will be replaced by the bench I am making. This solved the conundrum of needing a bench to build a bench. It will get reused some where else in my shop.
Excellent job, I can't wait to see how it turns out!
 

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building the bases



So my latest project is officially underway. Click Here http://lumberjocks.com/bfd/blog/8062 to see the back story and details. I decide to build from the ground up so I start with the slab legs first.

Here you see one end panel with the heavy duty glides attached and the 3 inner layers of Particle board. The glides are rated for either 1000 or 2000 lbs (either way they should hold!) The layers are glued and screwed together to make a particle board sandwich.





I then attach the other end panel along with the back piece.



Next I mill some 8/4 solid maple leaving it slightly proud of the end panels and glue them in place. Once the glue has cured overnight I come back and plane down the maple until it is flush with the end panels. Once I veneer the sides I will come back and add an additional 1/4" solid maple piece to the front and back giving the look of a solid maple slab. I ordered both my walnut and maple veneer from VeneerSupplies.com and should be receiving that in the next week. Until then I am at a stand still with the legs. The legs prove to have the weight I wanted for stability. the Legs at this point weighs in at 75 lbs a piece!



Here is a picture of the top that I picked up locally.



While I am waiting for my veneer to arrive I decide to mill up my stock for the 4" thick apron.



And then start on the center storage case by cutting the panels that will be veneered in Walnut. Here I have done a quick dry fit and have labeled the parts. I also resaw some walnut to a finished 1/4" thickness that I will use as edging for the case. I also take stock of my other outstanding materials and order the vises and drawer slides from Lee Valley. Hopefully they arrive soon so I can continue work on the top.



Here you can see the current multi purpose bench that will be replaced by the bench I am making. This solved the conundrum of needing a bench to build a bench. It will get reused some where else in my shop.
great start…Jarrod is right!!! This thing will be done fast…THANK YOU FOR THE GREAT DETAILS!!!
 

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building the bases



So my latest project is officially underway. Click Here http://lumberjocks.com/bfd/blog/8062 to see the back story and details. I decide to build from the ground up so I start with the slab legs first.

Here you see one end panel with the heavy duty glides attached and the 3 inner layers of Particle board. The glides are rated for either 1000 or 2000 lbs (either way they should hold!) The layers are glued and screwed together to make a particle board sandwich.





I then attach the other end panel along with the back piece.



Next I mill some 8/4 solid maple leaving it slightly proud of the end panels and glue them in place. Once the glue has cured overnight I come back and plane down the maple until it is flush with the end panels. Once I veneer the sides I will come back and add an additional 1/4" solid maple piece to the front and back giving the look of a solid maple slab. I ordered both my walnut and maple veneer from VeneerSupplies.com and should be receiving that in the next week. Until then I am at a stand still with the legs. The legs prove to have the weight I wanted for stability. the Legs at this point weighs in at 75 lbs a piece!



Here is a picture of the top that I picked up locally.



While I am waiting for my veneer to arrive I decide to mill up my stock for the 4" thick apron.



And then start on the center storage case by cutting the panels that will be veneered in Walnut. Here I have done a quick dry fit and have labeled the parts. I also resaw some walnut to a finished 1/4" thickness that I will use as edging for the case. I also take stock of my other outstanding materials and order the vises and drawer slides from Lee Valley. Hopefully they arrive soon so I can continue work on the top.



Here you can see the current multi purpose bench that will be replaced by the bench I am making. This solved the conundrum of needing a bench to build a bench. It will get reused some where else in my shop.
Man, besides looking like it will be solid as a rock that bench has some style to it! I'm looking forward to seeing the progress…
 

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building the bases



So my latest project is officially underway. Click Here http://lumberjocks.com/bfd/blog/8062 to see the back story and details. I decide to build from the ground up so I start with the slab legs first.

Here you see one end panel with the heavy duty glides attached and the 3 inner layers of Particle board. The glides are rated for either 1000 or 2000 lbs (either way they should hold!) The layers are glued and screwed together to make a particle board sandwich.





I then attach the other end panel along with the back piece.



Next I mill some 8/4 solid maple leaving it slightly proud of the end panels and glue them in place. Once the glue has cured overnight I come back and plane down the maple until it is flush with the end panels. Once I veneer the sides I will come back and add an additional 1/4" solid maple piece to the front and back giving the look of a solid maple slab. I ordered both my walnut and maple veneer from VeneerSupplies.com and should be receiving that in the next week. Until then I am at a stand still with the legs. The legs prove to have the weight I wanted for stability. the Legs at this point weighs in at 75 lbs a piece!



Here is a picture of the top that I picked up locally.



While I am waiting for my veneer to arrive I decide to mill up my stock for the 4" thick apron.



And then start on the center storage case by cutting the panels that will be veneered in Walnut. Here I have done a quick dry fit and have labeled the parts. I also resaw some walnut to a finished 1/4" thickness that I will use as edging for the case. I also take stock of my other outstanding materials and order the vises and drawer slides from Lee Valley. Hopefully they arrive soon so I can continue work on the top.



Here you can see the current multi purpose bench that will be replaced by the bench I am making. This solved the conundrum of needing a bench to build a bench. It will get reused some where else in my shop.
Hey Brian, way to go!!!!! What a bench…..... Shouldn't the name of it be "Gibralter"
?
Can't wait to see the finished piece, I'll be watching.
 
Joined
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building the bases



So my latest project is officially underway. Click Here http://lumberjocks.com/bfd/blog/8062 to see the back story and details. I decide to build from the ground up so I start with the slab legs first.

Here you see one end panel with the heavy duty glides attached and the 3 inner layers of Particle board. The glides are rated for either 1000 or 2000 lbs (either way they should hold!) The layers are glued and screwed together to make a particle board sandwich.





I then attach the other end panel along with the back piece.



Next I mill some 8/4 solid maple leaving it slightly proud of the end panels and glue them in place. Once the glue has cured overnight I come back and plane down the maple until it is flush with the end panels. Once I veneer the sides I will come back and add an additional 1/4" solid maple piece to the front and back giving the look of a solid maple slab. I ordered both my walnut and maple veneer from VeneerSupplies.com and should be receiving that in the next week. Until then I am at a stand still with the legs. The legs prove to have the weight I wanted for stability. the Legs at this point weighs in at 75 lbs a piece!



Here is a picture of the top that I picked up locally.



While I am waiting for my veneer to arrive I decide to mill up my stock for the 4" thick apron.



And then start on the center storage case by cutting the panels that will be veneered in Walnut. Here I have done a quick dry fit and have labeled the parts. I also resaw some walnut to a finished 1/4" thickness that I will use as edging for the case. I also take stock of my other outstanding materials and order the vises and drawer slides from Lee Valley. Hopefully they arrive soon so I can continue work on the top.



Here you can see the current multi purpose bench that will be replaced by the bench I am making. This solved the conundrum of needing a bench to build a bench. It will get reused some where else in my shop.
Great start!
 

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building the bases



So my latest project is officially underway. Click Here http://lumberjocks.com/bfd/blog/8062 to see the back story and details. I decide to build from the ground up so I start with the slab legs first.

Here you see one end panel with the heavy duty glides attached and the 3 inner layers of Particle board. The glides are rated for either 1000 or 2000 lbs (either way they should hold!) The layers are glued and screwed together to make a particle board sandwich.





I then attach the other end panel along with the back piece.



Next I mill some 8/4 solid maple leaving it slightly proud of the end panels and glue them in place. Once the glue has cured overnight I come back and plane down the maple until it is flush with the end panels. Once I veneer the sides I will come back and add an additional 1/4" solid maple piece to the front and back giving the look of a solid maple slab. I ordered both my walnut and maple veneer from VeneerSupplies.com and should be receiving that in the next week. Until then I am at a stand still with the legs. The legs prove to have the weight I wanted for stability. the Legs at this point weighs in at 75 lbs a piece!



Here is a picture of the top that I picked up locally.



While I am waiting for my veneer to arrive I decide to mill up my stock for the 4" thick apron.



And then start on the center storage case by cutting the panels that will be veneered in Walnut. Here I have done a quick dry fit and have labeled the parts. I also resaw some walnut to a finished 1/4" thickness that I will use as edging for the case. I also take stock of my other outstanding materials and order the vises and drawer slides from Lee Valley. Hopefully they arrive soon so I can continue work on the top.



Here you can see the current multi purpose bench that will be replaced by the bench I am making. This solved the conundrum of needing a bench to build a bench. It will get reused some where else in my shop.
looking good
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The base comes together



So my 3 sheets of veneer arrive and I open them to inspect them. I opted to use 2 ply 4×8 sheets to save time vs. laying up my own veneer. Out of the 3 sheets I rejected two, one walnut sheet which was supposed to be flat cut and the maple sheet which I paid a premium for to have wider leaves. The walnut piece didn't have any cathedraling in it at all and was made up entirely of the quartered portion of a flat cut piece of veneer. The supplier worked with me to get me replacement sheets ASAP. Honestly Joe at Veneer Supplies has to have some of the greatest customer service I have ever encountered. He totally gets it. I decide to keep one of the walnut sheets and use it for the inside of the storage case. I chalk out the sheet and cut it into pieces.





I veneer one side of each panel and clamp them up. I stack them on top of each other separating them with wax paper. I use one of the slab legs for added weight. The 75lbs comes in handy.





My replacement veneer arrives a few days later and I am able to veneer the other side of the panels that will make up the case. I also veneer the slab legs. I then attach 1/4" thick maple solids to each end of the slabs encasing them entirely in maple. I oversize the solid maple and then use my block plane to bring the edges flush with the veneer. I then use a 1/8" round over bit to soften the edges.





I then drill for the vertical dog holes in the side of the right leg.



The slab legs receive two coat of whip on poly. I will follow up with a few more coat once the base is assembled.

I next turn my attention to the construction of the case. With both sides of the top, bottom, back and fronts veneered I drill the sides for the 3/8" x 2 1/2" lag screws that will attach the case to the legs. The sides of the case are unfinished as they will not be seen. I recess the washer to be flush with the side of the case and mark the center lines for the drawer slides.




I then use my pocket hole jig and drill for the sides of the case.



I also rabbet the back of the sides, bottom, and top to accept the 3/4" back panel.



I glue up the case and add the 1/4" solid edge to the front side using blue tape as clamps. I miter the corners. Once dried I flush the edge to the case using a flush trim bit on my router and soften the top and bottom edge.



everything gets sanded and then the case receives two coats of tung oil to bring out the grain of the walnut.





Now for the fun part, assembling the base. To aid in the assembly I make a quick riser out of mdf to set the case on. I level the glides and then attach the case with 4 lag screws into each slab. I remove the riser and test for any lateral movement. Sure enough this thing is solid!!!

!







I couldn't resist seeing what it looked like with the top on (obviously without the apron yet). It is starting to come together. Next up the top.

 

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The base comes together



So my 3 sheets of veneer arrive and I open them to inspect them. I opted to use 2 ply 4×8 sheets to save time vs. laying up my own veneer. Out of the 3 sheets I rejected two, one walnut sheet which was supposed to be flat cut and the maple sheet which I paid a premium for to have wider leaves. The walnut piece didn't have any cathedraling in it at all and was made up entirely of the quartered portion of a flat cut piece of veneer. The supplier worked with me to get me replacement sheets ASAP. Honestly Joe at Veneer Supplies has to have some of the greatest customer service I have ever encountered. He totally gets it. I decide to keep one of the walnut sheets and use it for the inside of the storage case. I chalk out the sheet and cut it into pieces.





I veneer one side of each panel and clamp them up. I stack them on top of each other separating them with wax paper. I use one of the slab legs for added weight. The 75lbs comes in handy.





My replacement veneer arrives a few days later and I am able to veneer the other side of the panels that will make up the case. I also veneer the slab legs. I then attach 1/4" thick maple solids to each end of the slabs encasing them entirely in maple. I oversize the solid maple and then use my block plane to bring the edges flush with the veneer. I then use a 1/8" round over bit to soften the edges.





I then drill for the vertical dog holes in the side of the right leg.



The slab legs receive two coat of whip on poly. I will follow up with a few more coat once the base is assembled.

I next turn my attention to the construction of the case. With both sides of the top, bottom, back and fronts veneered I drill the sides for the 3/8" x 2 1/2" lag screws that will attach the case to the legs. The sides of the case are unfinished as they will not be seen. I recess the washer to be flush with the side of the case and mark the center lines for the drawer slides.




I then use my pocket hole jig and drill for the sides of the case.



I also rabbet the back of the sides, bottom, and top to accept the 3/4" back panel.



I glue up the case and add the 1/4" solid edge to the front side using blue tape as clamps. I miter the corners. Once dried I flush the edge to the case using a flush trim bit on my router and soften the top and bottom edge.



everything gets sanded and then the case receives two coats of tung oil to bring out the grain of the walnut.





Now for the fun part, assembling the base. To aid in the assembly I make a quick riser out of mdf to set the case on. I level the glides and then attach the case with 4 lag screws into each slab. I remove the riser and test for any lateral movement. Sure enough this thing is solid!!!

!







I couldn't resist seeing what it looked like with the top on (obviously without the apron yet). It is starting to come together. Next up the top.

looks great! gotta love that walnut grain, and those clean lines on this bench give it a beautiful balance.
 

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The base comes together



So my 3 sheets of veneer arrive and I open them to inspect them. I opted to use 2 ply 4×8 sheets to save time vs. laying up my own veneer. Out of the 3 sheets I rejected two, one walnut sheet which was supposed to be flat cut and the maple sheet which I paid a premium for to have wider leaves. The walnut piece didn't have any cathedraling in it at all and was made up entirely of the quartered portion of a flat cut piece of veneer. The supplier worked with me to get me replacement sheets ASAP. Honestly Joe at Veneer Supplies has to have some of the greatest customer service I have ever encountered. He totally gets it. I decide to keep one of the walnut sheets and use it for the inside of the storage case. I chalk out the sheet and cut it into pieces.





I veneer one side of each panel and clamp them up. I stack them on top of each other separating them with wax paper. I use one of the slab legs for added weight. The 75lbs comes in handy.





My replacement veneer arrives a few days later and I am able to veneer the other side of the panels that will make up the case. I also veneer the slab legs. I then attach 1/4" thick maple solids to each end of the slabs encasing them entirely in maple. I oversize the solid maple and then use my block plane to bring the edges flush with the veneer. I then use a 1/8" round over bit to soften the edges.





I then drill for the vertical dog holes in the side of the right leg.



The slab legs receive two coat of whip on poly. I will follow up with a few more coat once the base is assembled.

I next turn my attention to the construction of the case. With both sides of the top, bottom, back and fronts veneered I drill the sides for the 3/8" x 2 1/2" lag screws that will attach the case to the legs. The sides of the case are unfinished as they will not be seen. I recess the washer to be flush with the side of the case and mark the center lines for the drawer slides.




I then use my pocket hole jig and drill for the sides of the case.



I also rabbet the back of the sides, bottom, and top to accept the 3/4" back panel.



I glue up the case and add the 1/4" solid edge to the front side using blue tape as clamps. I miter the corners. Once dried I flush the edge to the case using a flush trim bit on my router and soften the top and bottom edge.



everything gets sanded and then the case receives two coats of tung oil to bring out the grain of the walnut.





Now for the fun part, assembling the base. To aid in the assembly I make a quick riser out of mdf to set the case on. I level the glides and then attach the case with 4 lag screws into each slab. I remove the riser and test for any lateral movement. Sure enough this thing is solid!!!

!







I couldn't resist seeing what it looked like with the top on (obviously without the apron yet). It is starting to come together. Next up the top.

Great looking job so far. Looks nice and clean.
 

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The base comes together



So my 3 sheets of veneer arrive and I open them to inspect them. I opted to use 2 ply 4×8 sheets to save time vs. laying up my own veneer. Out of the 3 sheets I rejected two, one walnut sheet which was supposed to be flat cut and the maple sheet which I paid a premium for to have wider leaves. The walnut piece didn't have any cathedraling in it at all and was made up entirely of the quartered portion of a flat cut piece of veneer. The supplier worked with me to get me replacement sheets ASAP. Honestly Joe at Veneer Supplies has to have some of the greatest customer service I have ever encountered. He totally gets it. I decide to keep one of the walnut sheets and use it for the inside of the storage case. I chalk out the sheet and cut it into pieces.





I veneer one side of each panel and clamp them up. I stack them on top of each other separating them with wax paper. I use one of the slab legs for added weight. The 75lbs comes in handy.





My replacement veneer arrives a few days later and I am able to veneer the other side of the panels that will make up the case. I also veneer the slab legs. I then attach 1/4" thick maple solids to each end of the slabs encasing them entirely in maple. I oversize the solid maple and then use my block plane to bring the edges flush with the veneer. I then use a 1/8" round over bit to soften the edges.





I then drill for the vertical dog holes in the side of the right leg.



The slab legs receive two coat of whip on poly. I will follow up with a few more coat once the base is assembled.

I next turn my attention to the construction of the case. With both sides of the top, bottom, back and fronts veneered I drill the sides for the 3/8" x 2 1/2" lag screws that will attach the case to the legs. The sides of the case are unfinished as they will not be seen. I recess the washer to be flush with the side of the case and mark the center lines for the drawer slides.




I then use my pocket hole jig and drill for the sides of the case.



I also rabbet the back of the sides, bottom, and top to accept the 3/4" back panel.



I glue up the case and add the 1/4" solid edge to the front side using blue tape as clamps. I miter the corners. Once dried I flush the edge to the case using a flush trim bit on my router and soften the top and bottom edge.



everything gets sanded and then the case receives two coats of tung oil to bring out the grain of the walnut.





Now for the fun part, assembling the base. To aid in the assembly I make a quick riser out of mdf to set the case on. I level the glides and then attach the case with 4 lag screws into each slab. I remove the riser and test for any lateral movement. Sure enough this thing is solid!!!

!







I couldn't resist seeing what it looked like with the top on (obviously without the apron yet). It is starting to come together. Next up the top.

awesome
 

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The base comes together



So my 3 sheets of veneer arrive and I open them to inspect them. I opted to use 2 ply 4×8 sheets to save time vs. laying up my own veneer. Out of the 3 sheets I rejected two, one walnut sheet which was supposed to be flat cut and the maple sheet which I paid a premium for to have wider leaves. The walnut piece didn't have any cathedraling in it at all and was made up entirely of the quartered portion of a flat cut piece of veneer. The supplier worked with me to get me replacement sheets ASAP. Honestly Joe at Veneer Supplies has to have some of the greatest customer service I have ever encountered. He totally gets it. I decide to keep one of the walnut sheets and use it for the inside of the storage case. I chalk out the sheet and cut it into pieces.





I veneer one side of each panel and clamp them up. I stack them on top of each other separating them with wax paper. I use one of the slab legs for added weight. The 75lbs comes in handy.





My replacement veneer arrives a few days later and I am able to veneer the other side of the panels that will make up the case. I also veneer the slab legs. I then attach 1/4" thick maple solids to each end of the slabs encasing them entirely in maple. I oversize the solid maple and then use my block plane to bring the edges flush with the veneer. I then use a 1/8" round over bit to soften the edges.





I then drill for the vertical dog holes in the side of the right leg.



The slab legs receive two coat of whip on poly. I will follow up with a few more coat once the base is assembled.

I next turn my attention to the construction of the case. With both sides of the top, bottom, back and fronts veneered I drill the sides for the 3/8" x 2 1/2" lag screws that will attach the case to the legs. The sides of the case are unfinished as they will not be seen. I recess the washer to be flush with the side of the case and mark the center lines for the drawer slides.




I then use my pocket hole jig and drill for the sides of the case.



I also rabbet the back of the sides, bottom, and top to accept the 3/4" back panel.



I glue up the case and add the 1/4" solid edge to the front side using blue tape as clamps. I miter the corners. Once dried I flush the edge to the case using a flush trim bit on my router and soften the top and bottom edge.



everything gets sanded and then the case receives two coats of tung oil to bring out the grain of the walnut.





Now for the fun part, assembling the base. To aid in the assembly I make a quick riser out of mdf to set the case on. I level the glides and then attach the case with 4 lag screws into each slab. I remove the riser and test for any lateral movement. Sure enough this thing is solid!!!

!







I couldn't resist seeing what it looked like with the top on (obviously without the apron yet). It is starting to come together. Next up the top.

Hadn't caught this before. Really cool looking - bit flimsy though ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The base comes together



So my 3 sheets of veneer arrive and I open them to inspect them. I opted to use 2 ply 4×8 sheets to save time vs. laying up my own veneer. Out of the 3 sheets I rejected two, one walnut sheet which was supposed to be flat cut and the maple sheet which I paid a premium for to have wider leaves. The walnut piece didn't have any cathedraling in it at all and was made up entirely of the quartered portion of a flat cut piece of veneer. The supplier worked with me to get me replacement sheets ASAP. Honestly Joe at Veneer Supplies has to have some of the greatest customer service I have ever encountered. He totally gets it. I decide to keep one of the walnut sheets and use it for the inside of the storage case. I chalk out the sheet and cut it into pieces.





I veneer one side of each panel and clamp them up. I stack them on top of each other separating them with wax paper. I use one of the slab legs for added weight. The 75lbs comes in handy.





My replacement veneer arrives a few days later and I am able to veneer the other side of the panels that will make up the case. I also veneer the slab legs. I then attach 1/4" thick maple solids to each end of the slabs encasing them entirely in maple. I oversize the solid maple and then use my block plane to bring the edges flush with the veneer. I then use a 1/8" round over bit to soften the edges.





I then drill for the vertical dog holes in the side of the right leg.



The slab legs receive two coat of whip on poly. I will follow up with a few more coat once the base is assembled.

I next turn my attention to the construction of the case. With both sides of the top, bottom, back and fronts veneered I drill the sides for the 3/8" x 2 1/2" lag screws that will attach the case to the legs. The sides of the case are unfinished as they will not be seen. I recess the washer to be flush with the side of the case and mark the center lines for the drawer slides.




I then use my pocket hole jig and drill for the sides of the case.



I also rabbet the back of the sides, bottom, and top to accept the 3/4" back panel.



I glue up the case and add the 1/4" solid edge to the front side using blue tape as clamps. I miter the corners. Once dried I flush the edge to the case using a flush trim bit on my router and soften the top and bottom edge.



everything gets sanded and then the case receives two coats of tung oil to bring out the grain of the walnut.





Now for the fun part, assembling the base. To aid in the assembly I make a quick riser out of mdf to set the case on. I level the glides and then attach the case with 4 lag screws into each slab. I remove the riser and test for any lateral movement. Sure enough this thing is solid!!!

!







I couldn't resist seeing what it looked like with the top on (obviously without the apron yet). It is starting to come together. Next up the top.

Thanks guys for your comments.
 

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The base comes together



So my 3 sheets of veneer arrive and I open them to inspect them. I opted to use 2 ply 4×8 sheets to save time vs. laying up my own veneer. Out of the 3 sheets I rejected two, one walnut sheet which was supposed to be flat cut and the maple sheet which I paid a premium for to have wider leaves. The walnut piece didn't have any cathedraling in it at all and was made up entirely of the quartered portion of a flat cut piece of veneer. The supplier worked with me to get me replacement sheets ASAP. Honestly Joe at Veneer Supplies has to have some of the greatest customer service I have ever encountered. He totally gets it. I decide to keep one of the walnut sheets and use it for the inside of the storage case. I chalk out the sheet and cut it into pieces.





I veneer one side of each panel and clamp them up. I stack them on top of each other separating them with wax paper. I use one of the slab legs for added weight. The 75lbs comes in handy.





My replacement veneer arrives a few days later and I am able to veneer the other side of the panels that will make up the case. I also veneer the slab legs. I then attach 1/4" thick maple solids to each end of the slabs encasing them entirely in maple. I oversize the solid maple and then use my block plane to bring the edges flush with the veneer. I then use a 1/8" round over bit to soften the edges.





I then drill for the vertical dog holes in the side of the right leg.



The slab legs receive two coat of whip on poly. I will follow up with a few more coat once the base is assembled.

I next turn my attention to the construction of the case. With both sides of the top, bottom, back and fronts veneered I drill the sides for the 3/8" x 2 1/2" lag screws that will attach the case to the legs. The sides of the case are unfinished as they will not be seen. I recess the washer to be flush with the side of the case and mark the center lines for the drawer slides.




I then use my pocket hole jig and drill for the sides of the case.



I also rabbet the back of the sides, bottom, and top to accept the 3/4" back panel.



I glue up the case and add the 1/4" solid edge to the front side using blue tape as clamps. I miter the corners. Once dried I flush the edge to the case using a flush trim bit on my router and soften the top and bottom edge.



everything gets sanded and then the case receives two coats of tung oil to bring out the grain of the walnut.





Now for the fun part, assembling the base. To aid in the assembly I make a quick riser out of mdf to set the case on. I level the glides and then attach the case with 4 lag screws into each slab. I remove the riser and test for any lateral movement. Sure enough this thing is solid!!!

!







I couldn't resist seeing what it looked like with the top on (obviously without the apron yet). It is starting to come together. Next up the top.

thaqt looks cool can't wait to see the finished piece

Andy
 

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The base comes together



So my 3 sheets of veneer arrive and I open them to inspect them. I opted to use 2 ply 4×8 sheets to save time vs. laying up my own veneer. Out of the 3 sheets I rejected two, one walnut sheet which was supposed to be flat cut and the maple sheet which I paid a premium for to have wider leaves. The walnut piece didn't have any cathedraling in it at all and was made up entirely of the quartered portion of a flat cut piece of veneer. The supplier worked with me to get me replacement sheets ASAP. Honestly Joe at Veneer Supplies has to have some of the greatest customer service I have ever encountered. He totally gets it. I decide to keep one of the walnut sheets and use it for the inside of the storage case. I chalk out the sheet and cut it into pieces.





I veneer one side of each panel and clamp them up. I stack them on top of each other separating them with wax paper. I use one of the slab legs for added weight. The 75lbs comes in handy.





My replacement veneer arrives a few days later and I am able to veneer the other side of the panels that will make up the case. I also veneer the slab legs. I then attach 1/4" thick maple solids to each end of the slabs encasing them entirely in maple. I oversize the solid maple and then use my block plane to bring the edges flush with the veneer. I then use a 1/8" round over bit to soften the edges.





I then drill for the vertical dog holes in the side of the right leg.



The slab legs receive two coat of whip on poly. I will follow up with a few more coat once the base is assembled.

I next turn my attention to the construction of the case. With both sides of the top, bottom, back and fronts veneered I drill the sides for the 3/8" x 2 1/2" lag screws that will attach the case to the legs. The sides of the case are unfinished as they will not be seen. I recess the washer to be flush with the side of the case and mark the center lines for the drawer slides.




I then use my pocket hole jig and drill for the sides of the case.



I also rabbet the back of the sides, bottom, and top to accept the 3/4" back panel.



I glue up the case and add the 1/4" solid edge to the front side using blue tape as clamps. I miter the corners. Once dried I flush the edge to the case using a flush trim bit on my router and soften the top and bottom edge.



everything gets sanded and then the case receives two coats of tung oil to bring out the grain of the walnut.





Now for the fun part, assembling the base. To aid in the assembly I make a quick riser out of mdf to set the case on. I level the glides and then attach the case with 4 lag screws into each slab. I remove the riser and test for any lateral movement. Sure enough this thing is solid!!!

!







I couldn't resist seeing what it looked like with the top on (obviously without the apron yet). It is starting to come together. Next up the top.

Very nice so far!
 

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The base comes together



So my 3 sheets of veneer arrive and I open them to inspect them. I opted to use 2 ply 4×8 sheets to save time vs. laying up my own veneer. Out of the 3 sheets I rejected two, one walnut sheet which was supposed to be flat cut and the maple sheet which I paid a premium for to have wider leaves. The walnut piece didn't have any cathedraling in it at all and was made up entirely of the quartered portion of a flat cut piece of veneer. The supplier worked with me to get me replacement sheets ASAP. Honestly Joe at Veneer Supplies has to have some of the greatest customer service I have ever encountered. He totally gets it. I decide to keep one of the walnut sheets and use it for the inside of the storage case. I chalk out the sheet and cut it into pieces.





I veneer one side of each panel and clamp them up. I stack them on top of each other separating them with wax paper. I use one of the slab legs for added weight. The 75lbs comes in handy.





My replacement veneer arrives a few days later and I am able to veneer the other side of the panels that will make up the case. I also veneer the slab legs. I then attach 1/4" thick maple solids to each end of the slabs encasing them entirely in maple. I oversize the solid maple and then use my block plane to bring the edges flush with the veneer. I then use a 1/8" round over bit to soften the edges.





I then drill for the vertical dog holes in the side of the right leg.



The slab legs receive two coat of whip on poly. I will follow up with a few more coat once the base is assembled.

I next turn my attention to the construction of the case. With both sides of the top, bottom, back and fronts veneered I drill the sides for the 3/8" x 2 1/2" lag screws that will attach the case to the legs. The sides of the case are unfinished as they will not be seen. I recess the washer to be flush with the side of the case and mark the center lines for the drawer slides.




I then use my pocket hole jig and drill for the sides of the case.



I also rabbet the back of the sides, bottom, and top to accept the 3/4" back panel.



I glue up the case and add the 1/4" solid edge to the front side using blue tape as clamps. I miter the corners. Once dried I flush the edge to the case using a flush trim bit on my router and soften the top and bottom edge.



everything gets sanded and then the case receives two coats of tung oil to bring out the grain of the walnut.





Now for the fun part, assembling the base. To aid in the assembly I make a quick riser out of mdf to set the case on. I level the glides and then attach the case with 4 lag screws into each slab. I remove the riser and test for any lateral movement. Sure enough this thing is solid!!!

!







I couldn't resist seeing what it looked like with the top on (obviously without the apron yet). It is starting to come together. Next up the top.

bfd I have a question regarding the feet. Are they side mounted to the particleboard and if they are, are you concerned that the way they are attached will have enough holding power over time (and abuse)?
 

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The base comes together



So my 3 sheets of veneer arrive and I open them to inspect them. I opted to use 2 ply 4×8 sheets to save time vs. laying up my own veneer. Out of the 3 sheets I rejected two, one walnut sheet which was supposed to be flat cut and the maple sheet which I paid a premium for to have wider leaves. The walnut piece didn't have any cathedraling in it at all and was made up entirely of the quartered portion of a flat cut piece of veneer. The supplier worked with me to get me replacement sheets ASAP. Honestly Joe at Veneer Supplies has to have some of the greatest customer service I have ever encountered. He totally gets it. I decide to keep one of the walnut sheets and use it for the inside of the storage case. I chalk out the sheet and cut it into pieces.





I veneer one side of each panel and clamp them up. I stack them on top of each other separating them with wax paper. I use one of the slab legs for added weight. The 75lbs comes in handy.





My replacement veneer arrives a few days later and I am able to veneer the other side of the panels that will make up the case. I also veneer the slab legs. I then attach 1/4" thick maple solids to each end of the slabs encasing them entirely in maple. I oversize the solid maple and then use my block plane to bring the edges flush with the veneer. I then use a 1/8" round over bit to soften the edges.





I then drill for the vertical dog holes in the side of the right leg.



The slab legs receive two coat of whip on poly. I will follow up with a few more coat once the base is assembled.

I next turn my attention to the construction of the case. With both sides of the top, bottom, back and fronts veneered I drill the sides for the 3/8" x 2 1/2" lag screws that will attach the case to the legs. The sides of the case are unfinished as they will not be seen. I recess the washer to be flush with the side of the case and mark the center lines for the drawer slides.




I then use my pocket hole jig and drill for the sides of the case.



I also rabbet the back of the sides, bottom, and top to accept the 3/4" back panel.



I glue up the case and add the 1/4" solid edge to the front side using blue tape as clamps. I miter the corners. Once dried I flush the edge to the case using a flush trim bit on my router and soften the top and bottom edge.



everything gets sanded and then the case receives two coats of tung oil to bring out the grain of the walnut.





Now for the fun part, assembling the base. To aid in the assembly I make a quick riser out of mdf to set the case on. I level the glides and then attach the case with 4 lag screws into each slab. I remove the riser and test for any lateral movement. Sure enough this thing is solid!!!

!







I couldn't resist seeing what it looked like with the top on (obviously without the apron yet). It is starting to come together. Next up the top.

Brian, this is looking good so far. This is going to be a nice tool when you get finished with it. It will not only be functional but it will also look good as well.

I am looking forward to seeing the next post.
 

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The base comes together



So my 3 sheets of veneer arrive and I open them to inspect them. I opted to use 2 ply 4×8 sheets to save time vs. laying up my own veneer. Out of the 3 sheets I rejected two, one walnut sheet which was supposed to be flat cut and the maple sheet which I paid a premium for to have wider leaves. The walnut piece didn't have any cathedraling in it at all and was made up entirely of the quartered portion of a flat cut piece of veneer. The supplier worked with me to get me replacement sheets ASAP. Honestly Joe at Veneer Supplies has to have some of the greatest customer service I have ever encountered. He totally gets it. I decide to keep one of the walnut sheets and use it for the inside of the storage case. I chalk out the sheet and cut it into pieces.





I veneer one side of each panel and clamp them up. I stack them on top of each other separating them with wax paper. I use one of the slab legs for added weight. The 75lbs comes in handy.





My replacement veneer arrives a few days later and I am able to veneer the other side of the panels that will make up the case. I also veneer the slab legs. I then attach 1/4" thick maple solids to each end of the slabs encasing them entirely in maple. I oversize the solid maple and then use my block plane to bring the edges flush with the veneer. I then use a 1/8" round over bit to soften the edges.





I then drill for the vertical dog holes in the side of the right leg.



The slab legs receive two coat of whip on poly. I will follow up with a few more coat once the base is assembled.

I next turn my attention to the construction of the case. With both sides of the top, bottom, back and fronts veneered I drill the sides for the 3/8" x 2 1/2" lag screws that will attach the case to the legs. The sides of the case are unfinished as they will not be seen. I recess the washer to be flush with the side of the case and mark the center lines for the drawer slides.




I then use my pocket hole jig and drill for the sides of the case.



I also rabbet the back of the sides, bottom, and top to accept the 3/4" back panel.



I glue up the case and add the 1/4" solid edge to the front side using blue tape as clamps. I miter the corners. Once dried I flush the edge to the case using a flush trim bit on my router and soften the top and bottom edge.



everything gets sanded and then the case receives two coats of tung oil to bring out the grain of the walnut.





Now for the fun part, assembling the base. To aid in the assembly I make a quick riser out of mdf to set the case on. I level the glides and then attach the case with 4 lag screws into each slab. I remove the riser and test for any lateral movement. Sure enough this thing is solid!!!

!







I couldn't resist seeing what it looked like with the top on (obviously without the apron yet). It is starting to come together. Next up the top.

wow…brian this is so great…i love the photos…and flimsy is not on my mind…lol…

cant wait to meet you tomorrow…!!! Bring your bag!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The base comes together



So my 3 sheets of veneer arrive and I open them to inspect them. I opted to use 2 ply 4×8 sheets to save time vs. laying up my own veneer. Out of the 3 sheets I rejected two, one walnut sheet which was supposed to be flat cut and the maple sheet which I paid a premium for to have wider leaves. The walnut piece didn't have any cathedraling in it at all and was made up entirely of the quartered portion of a flat cut piece of veneer. The supplier worked with me to get me replacement sheets ASAP. Honestly Joe at Veneer Supplies has to have some of the greatest customer service I have ever encountered. He totally gets it. I decide to keep one of the walnut sheets and use it for the inside of the storage case. I chalk out the sheet and cut it into pieces.





I veneer one side of each panel and clamp them up. I stack them on top of each other separating them with wax paper. I use one of the slab legs for added weight. The 75lbs comes in handy.





My replacement veneer arrives a few days later and I am able to veneer the other side of the panels that will make up the case. I also veneer the slab legs. I then attach 1/4" thick maple solids to each end of the slabs encasing them entirely in maple. I oversize the solid maple and then use my block plane to bring the edges flush with the veneer. I then use a 1/8" round over bit to soften the edges.





I then drill for the vertical dog holes in the side of the right leg.



The slab legs receive two coat of whip on poly. I will follow up with a few more coat once the base is assembled.

I next turn my attention to the construction of the case. With both sides of the top, bottom, back and fronts veneered I drill the sides for the 3/8" x 2 1/2" lag screws that will attach the case to the legs. The sides of the case are unfinished as they will not be seen. I recess the washer to be flush with the side of the case and mark the center lines for the drawer slides.




I then use my pocket hole jig and drill for the sides of the case.



I also rabbet the back of the sides, bottom, and top to accept the 3/4" back panel.



I glue up the case and add the 1/4" solid edge to the front side using blue tape as clamps. I miter the corners. Once dried I flush the edge to the case using a flush trim bit on my router and soften the top and bottom edge.



everything gets sanded and then the case receives two coats of tung oil to bring out the grain of the walnut.





Now for the fun part, assembling the base. To aid in the assembly I make a quick riser out of mdf to set the case on. I level the glides and then attach the case with 4 lag screws into each slab. I remove the riser and test for any lateral movement. Sure enough this thing is solid!!!

!







I couldn't resist seeing what it looked like with the top on (obviously without the apron yet). It is starting to come together. Next up the top.

Hi jlsmith5963,

I am not too worried about the feet they are secured to the particle board with 6 screws. With the addition of the metal lip that laps over the bottom of the side I don't anticipate any strain or failure over time. If that lip wasn't there to transfer the weight I would be very worried but these glides are designed for this exact application and are rated to 1000 lbs each so they should hold.
 
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