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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Preparing some steelwork

It must be about four years since I first had a vague idea of reproducing this Roman plane from around the second century AD. The original has an ivory infill body, and is remarkably complete. I gained permission from the curator of the Guildhall Museum in Beverley, East Yorkshire, England, to take some measurements and photographs when the plane was removed from its environmentally controlled cabinet for its periodic inspection.

This blog is where I originally touched on the subject, and here is the finished project.

Roman Plane 1

Roman Plane 2

My method of construction is very very different from the craftsman of 1800 years ago (!) and is perhaps unorthodox, but it suits the materials I had around as well as the limited skills I possess, especially in the metalworking field. Blacksmithing certainly isn't in my repertoire, so I chose to fabricate the soleplate

Here, I have roughly cut the sheet steel and angle with a cutting disc in the angle grinder.

Roman Plane 3

Roman Plane 4

Beginning to rivet (and epoxy) the main soleplate components using the dome-headed rivets I had to hand. Countersunk ones would have been better.
Roman Plane 5

Ten rivets in place. The sole plate is set against the archaeologist's drawings of the original plane.

Roman Plane 6

The soleplate marked out ready for cutting the mouth. More handfiling than I have ever done since school has brought the edges to a decent state.

Roman Plane 7

Squaring up the mouth and filing the 65° angle.
Roman Plane 8
 

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Preparing some steelwork

It must be about four years since I first had a vague idea of reproducing this Roman plane from around the second century AD. The original has an ivory infill body, and is remarkably complete. I gained permission from the curator of the Guildhall Museum in Beverley, East Yorkshire, England, to take some measurements and photographs when the plane was removed from its environmentally controlled cabinet for its periodic inspection.

This blog is where I originally touched on the subject, and here is the finished project.

Roman Plane 1

Roman Plane 2

My method of construction is very very different from the craftsman of 1800 years ago (!) and is perhaps unorthodox, but it suits the materials I had around as well as the limited skills I possess, especially in the metalworking field. Blacksmithing certainly isn't in my repertoire, so I chose to fabricate the soleplate

Here, I have roughly cut the sheet steel and angle with a cutting disc in the angle grinder.

Roman Plane 3

Roman Plane 4

Beginning to rivet (and epoxy) the main soleplate components using the dome-headed rivets I had to hand. Countersunk ones would have been better.
Roman Plane 5

Ten rivets in place. The sole plate is set against the archaeologist's drawings of the original plane.

Roman Plane 6

The soleplate marked out ready for cutting the mouth. More handfiling than I have ever done since school has brought the edges to a decent state.

Roman Plane 7

Squaring up the mouth and filing the 65° angle.
Roman Plane 8
Very interesting. I will be watching this one as you make progress.
 

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Preparing some steelwork

It must be about four years since I first had a vague idea of reproducing this Roman plane from around the second century AD. The original has an ivory infill body, and is remarkably complete. I gained permission from the curator of the Guildhall Museum in Beverley, East Yorkshire, England, to take some measurements and photographs when the plane was removed from its environmentally controlled cabinet for its periodic inspection.

This blog is where I originally touched on the subject, and here is the finished project.

Roman Plane 1

Roman Plane 2

My method of construction is very very different from the craftsman of 1800 years ago (!) and is perhaps unorthodox, but it suits the materials I had around as well as the limited skills I possess, especially in the metalworking field. Blacksmithing certainly isn't in my repertoire, so I chose to fabricate the soleplate

Here, I have roughly cut the sheet steel and angle with a cutting disc in the angle grinder.

Roman Plane 3

Roman Plane 4

Beginning to rivet (and epoxy) the main soleplate components using the dome-headed rivets I had to hand. Countersunk ones would have been better.
Roman Plane 5

Ten rivets in place. The sole plate is set against the archaeologist's drawings of the original plane.

Roman Plane 6

The soleplate marked out ready for cutting the mouth. More handfiling than I have ever done since school has brought the edges to a decent state.

Roman Plane 7

Squaring up the mouth and filing the 65° angle.
Roman Plane 8
Some amazing history there Stewart. Thanks for sharing. I am amazed it had a metal sole, was it bronze?.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Preparing some steelwork

It must be about four years since I first had a vague idea of reproducing this Roman plane from around the second century AD. The original has an ivory infill body, and is remarkably complete. I gained permission from the curator of the Guildhall Museum in Beverley, East Yorkshire, England, to take some measurements and photographs when the plane was removed from its environmentally controlled cabinet for its periodic inspection.

This blog is where I originally touched on the subject, and here is the finished project.

Roman Plane 1

Roman Plane 2

My method of construction is very very different from the craftsman of 1800 years ago (!) and is perhaps unorthodox, but it suits the materials I had around as well as the limited skills I possess, especially in the metalworking field. Blacksmithing certainly isn't in my repertoire, so I chose to fabricate the soleplate

Here, I have roughly cut the sheet steel and angle with a cutting disc in the angle grinder.

Roman Plane 3

Roman Plane 4

Beginning to rivet (and epoxy) the main soleplate components using the dome-headed rivets I had to hand. Countersunk ones would have been better.
Roman Plane 5

Ten rivets in place. The sole plate is set against the archaeologist's drawings of the original plane.

Roman Plane 6

The soleplate marked out ready for cutting the mouth. More handfiling than I have ever done since school has brought the edges to a decent state.

Roman Plane 7

Squaring up the mouth and filing the 65° angle.
Roman Plane 8
I'll try to upload some more details today Wayne. It's actually iron Grumpy. There are several Roman planes in existence with iron soles, but I believe this is the most complete.
 

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Preparing some steelwork

It must be about four years since I first had a vague idea of reproducing this Roman plane from around the second century AD. The original has an ivory infill body, and is remarkably complete. I gained permission from the curator of the Guildhall Museum in Beverley, East Yorkshire, England, to take some measurements and photographs when the plane was removed from its environmentally controlled cabinet for its periodic inspection.

This blog is where I originally touched on the subject, and here is the finished project.

Roman Plane 1

Roman Plane 2

My method of construction is very very different from the craftsman of 1800 years ago (!) and is perhaps unorthodox, but it suits the materials I had around as well as the limited skills I possess, especially in the metalworking field. Blacksmithing certainly isn't in my repertoire, so I chose to fabricate the soleplate

Here, I have roughly cut the sheet steel and angle with a cutting disc in the angle grinder.

Roman Plane 3

Roman Plane 4

Beginning to rivet (and epoxy) the main soleplate components using the dome-headed rivets I had to hand. Countersunk ones would have been better.
Roman Plane 5

Ten rivets in place. The sole plate is set against the archaeologist's drawings of the original plane.

Roman Plane 6

The soleplate marked out ready for cutting the mouth. More handfiling than I have ever done since school has brought the edges to a decent state.

Roman Plane 7

Squaring up the mouth and filing the 65° angle.
Roman Plane 8
Thanks sir.
 

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26,886 Posts
Preparing some steelwork

It must be about four years since I first had a vague idea of reproducing this Roman plane from around the second century AD. The original has an ivory infill body, and is remarkably complete. I gained permission from the curator of the Guildhall Museum in Beverley, East Yorkshire, England, to take some measurements and photographs when the plane was removed from its environmentally controlled cabinet for its periodic inspection.

This blog is where I originally touched on the subject, and here is the finished project.

Roman Plane 1

Roman Plane 2

My method of construction is very very different from the craftsman of 1800 years ago (!) and is perhaps unorthodox, but it suits the materials I had around as well as the limited skills I possess, especially in the metalworking field. Blacksmithing certainly isn't in my repertoire, so I chose to fabricate the soleplate

Here, I have roughly cut the sheet steel and angle with a cutting disc in the angle grinder.

Roman Plane 3

Roman Plane 4

Beginning to rivet (and epoxy) the main soleplate components using the dome-headed rivets I had to hand. Countersunk ones would have been better.
Roman Plane 5

Ten rivets in place. The sole plate is set against the archaeologist's drawings of the original plane.

Roman Plane 6

The soleplate marked out ready for cutting the mouth. More handfiling than I have ever done since school has brought the edges to a decent state.

Roman Plane 7

Squaring up the mouth and filing the 65° angle.
Roman Plane 8
Of course, makes a lot of sense.
 

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Preparing some steelwork

It must be about four years since I first had a vague idea of reproducing this Roman plane from around the second century AD. The original has an ivory infill body, and is remarkably complete. I gained permission from the curator of the Guildhall Museum in Beverley, East Yorkshire, England, to take some measurements and photographs when the plane was removed from its environmentally controlled cabinet for its periodic inspection.

This blog is where I originally touched on the subject, and here is the finished project.

Roman Plane 1

Roman Plane 2

My method of construction is very very different from the craftsman of 1800 years ago (!) and is perhaps unorthodox, but it suits the materials I had around as well as the limited skills I possess, especially in the metalworking field. Blacksmithing certainly isn't in my repertoire, so I chose to fabricate the soleplate

Here, I have roughly cut the sheet steel and angle with a cutting disc in the angle grinder.

Roman Plane 3

Roman Plane 4

Beginning to rivet (and epoxy) the main soleplate components using the dome-headed rivets I had to hand. Countersunk ones would have been better.
Roman Plane 5

Ten rivets in place. The sole plate is set against the archaeologist's drawings of the original plane.

Roman Plane 6

The soleplate marked out ready for cutting the mouth. More handfiling than I have ever done since school has brought the edges to a decent state.

Roman Plane 7

Squaring up the mouth and filing the 65° angle.
Roman Plane 8
Thanks for the post, Yorkie. This is going to be a nice reproduction when you are finished with it.
 

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Preparing some steelwork

It must be about four years since I first had a vague idea of reproducing this Roman plane from around the second century AD. The original has an ivory infill body, and is remarkably complete. I gained permission from the curator of the Guildhall Museum in Beverley, East Yorkshire, England, to take some measurements and photographs when the plane was removed from its environmentally controlled cabinet for its periodic inspection.

This blog is where I originally touched on the subject, and here is the finished project.

Roman Plane 1

Roman Plane 2

My method of construction is very very different from the craftsman of 1800 years ago (!) and is perhaps unorthodox, but it suits the materials I had around as well as the limited skills I possess, especially in the metalworking field. Blacksmithing certainly isn't in my repertoire, so I chose to fabricate the soleplate

Here, I have roughly cut the sheet steel and angle with a cutting disc in the angle grinder.

Roman Plane 3

Roman Plane 4

Beginning to rivet (and epoxy) the main soleplate components using the dome-headed rivets I had to hand. Countersunk ones would have been better.
Roman Plane 5

Ten rivets in place. The sole plate is set against the archaeologist's drawings of the original plane.

Roman Plane 6

The soleplate marked out ready for cutting the mouth. More handfiling than I have ever done since school has brought the edges to a decent state.

Roman Plane 7

Squaring up the mouth and filing the 65° angle.
Roman Plane 8
Are you going to share it with the musem?
 

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Preparing some steelwork

It must be about four years since I first had a vague idea of reproducing this Roman plane from around the second century AD. The original has an ivory infill body, and is remarkably complete. I gained permission from the curator of the Guildhall Museum in Beverley, East Yorkshire, England, to take some measurements and photographs when the plane was removed from its environmentally controlled cabinet for its periodic inspection.

This blog is where I originally touched on the subject, and here is the finished project.

Roman Plane 1

Roman Plane 2

My method of construction is very very different from the craftsman of 1800 years ago (!) and is perhaps unorthodox, but it suits the materials I had around as well as the limited skills I possess, especially in the metalworking field. Blacksmithing certainly isn't in my repertoire, so I chose to fabricate the soleplate

Here, I have roughly cut the sheet steel and angle with a cutting disc in the angle grinder.

Roman Plane 3

Roman Plane 4

Beginning to rivet (and epoxy) the main soleplate components using the dome-headed rivets I had to hand. Countersunk ones would have been better.
Roman Plane 5

Ten rivets in place. The sole plate is set against the archaeologist's drawings of the original plane.

Roman Plane 6

The soleplate marked out ready for cutting the mouth. More handfiling than I have ever done since school has brought the edges to a decent state.

Roman Plane 7

Squaring up the mouth and filing the 65° angle.
Roman Plane 8
this is very cool! i think that my history teacher would love to see this!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Preparing some steelwork

It must be about four years since I first had a vague idea of reproducing this Roman plane from around the second century AD. The original has an ivory infill body, and is remarkably complete. I gained permission from the curator of the Guildhall Museum in Beverley, East Yorkshire, England, to take some measurements and photographs when the plane was removed from its environmentally controlled cabinet for its periodic inspection.

This blog is where I originally touched on the subject, and here is the finished project.

Roman Plane 1

Roman Plane 2

My method of construction is very very different from the craftsman of 1800 years ago (!) and is perhaps unorthodox, but it suits the materials I had around as well as the limited skills I possess, especially in the metalworking field. Blacksmithing certainly isn't in my repertoire, so I chose to fabricate the soleplate

Here, I have roughly cut the sheet steel and angle with a cutting disc in the angle grinder.

Roman Plane 3

Roman Plane 4

Beginning to rivet (and epoxy) the main soleplate components using the dome-headed rivets I had to hand. Countersunk ones would have been better.
Roman Plane 5

Ten rivets in place. The sole plate is set against the archaeologist's drawings of the original plane.

Roman Plane 6

The soleplate marked out ready for cutting the mouth. More handfiling than I have ever done since school has brought the edges to a decent state.

Roman Plane 7

Squaring up the mouth and filing the 65° angle.
Roman Plane 8
Wayne - The curators are visiting me next week to see the tool in action. They're really interested & I might end up presenting it to them when I've had time to enjoy it.
 

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Preparing some steelwork

It must be about four years since I first had a vague idea of reproducing this Roman plane from around the second century AD. The original has an ivory infill body, and is remarkably complete. I gained permission from the curator of the Guildhall Museum in Beverley, East Yorkshire, England, to take some measurements and photographs when the plane was removed from its environmentally controlled cabinet for its periodic inspection.

This blog is where I originally touched on the subject, and here is the finished project.

Roman Plane 1

Roman Plane 2

My method of construction is very very different from the craftsman of 1800 years ago (!) and is perhaps unorthodox, but it suits the materials I had around as well as the limited skills I possess, especially in the metalworking field. Blacksmithing certainly isn't in my repertoire, so I chose to fabricate the soleplate

Here, I have roughly cut the sheet steel and angle with a cutting disc in the angle grinder.

Roman Plane 3

Roman Plane 4

Beginning to rivet (and epoxy) the main soleplate components using the dome-headed rivets I had to hand. Countersunk ones would have been better.
Roman Plane 5

Ten rivets in place. The sole plate is set against the archaeologist's drawings of the original plane.

Roman Plane 6

The soleplate marked out ready for cutting the mouth. More handfiling than I have ever done since school has brought the edges to a decent state.

Roman Plane 7

Squaring up the mouth and filing the 65° angle.
Roman Plane 8
Stewart, you always have the most interesting projects.
 

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Preparing some steelwork

It must be about four years since I first had a vague idea of reproducing this Roman plane from around the second century AD. The original has an ivory infill body, and is remarkably complete. I gained permission from the curator of the Guildhall Museum in Beverley, East Yorkshire, England, to take some measurements and photographs when the plane was removed from its environmentally controlled cabinet for its periodic inspection.

This blog is where I originally touched on the subject, and here is the finished project.

Roman Plane 1

Roman Plane 2

My method of construction is very very different from the craftsman of 1800 years ago (!) and is perhaps unorthodox, but it suits the materials I had around as well as the limited skills I possess, especially in the metalworking field. Blacksmithing certainly isn't in my repertoire, so I chose to fabricate the soleplate

Here, I have roughly cut the sheet steel and angle with a cutting disc in the angle grinder.

Roman Plane 3

Roman Plane 4

Beginning to rivet (and epoxy) the main soleplate components using the dome-headed rivets I had to hand. Countersunk ones would have been better.
Roman Plane 5

Ten rivets in place. The sole plate is set against the archaeologist's drawings of the original plane.

Roman Plane 6

The soleplate marked out ready for cutting the mouth. More handfiling than I have ever done since school has brought the edges to a decent state.

Roman Plane 7

Squaring up the mouth and filing the 65° angle.
Roman Plane 8
This should be good!
 

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Preparing some steelwork

It must be about four years since I first had a vague idea of reproducing this Roman plane from around the second century AD. The original has an ivory infill body, and is remarkably complete. I gained permission from the curator of the Guildhall Museum in Beverley, East Yorkshire, England, to take some measurements and photographs when the plane was removed from its environmentally controlled cabinet for its periodic inspection.

This blog is where I originally touched on the subject, and here is the finished project.

Roman Plane 1

Roman Plane 2

My method of construction is very very different from the craftsman of 1800 years ago (!) and is perhaps unorthodox, but it suits the materials I had around as well as the limited skills I possess, especially in the metalworking field. Blacksmithing certainly isn't in my repertoire, so I chose to fabricate the soleplate

Here, I have roughly cut the sheet steel and angle with a cutting disc in the angle grinder.

Roman Plane 3

Roman Plane 4

Beginning to rivet (and epoxy) the main soleplate components using the dome-headed rivets I had to hand. Countersunk ones would have been better.
Roman Plane 5

Ten rivets in place. The sole plate is set against the archaeologist's drawings of the original plane.

Roman Plane 6

The soleplate marked out ready for cutting the mouth. More handfiling than I have ever done since school has brought the edges to a decent state.

Roman Plane 7

Squaring up the mouth and filing the 65° angle.
Roman Plane 8
Wow Stewart, this is fantastic…
 

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Preparing some steelwork

It must be about four years since I first had a vague idea of reproducing this Roman plane from around the second century AD. The original has an ivory infill body, and is remarkably complete. I gained permission from the curator of the Guildhall Museum in Beverley, East Yorkshire, England, to take some measurements and photographs when the plane was removed from its environmentally controlled cabinet for its periodic inspection.

This blog is where I originally touched on the subject, and here is the finished project.

Roman Plane 1

Roman Plane 2

My method of construction is very very different from the craftsman of 1800 years ago (!) and is perhaps unorthodox, but it suits the materials I had around as well as the limited skills I possess, especially in the metalworking field. Blacksmithing certainly isn't in my repertoire, so I chose to fabricate the soleplate

Here, I have roughly cut the sheet steel and angle with a cutting disc in the angle grinder.

Roman Plane 3

Roman Plane 4

Beginning to rivet (and epoxy) the main soleplate components using the dome-headed rivets I had to hand. Countersunk ones would have been better.
Roman Plane 5

Ten rivets in place. The sole plate is set against the archaeologist's drawings of the original plane.

Roman Plane 6

The soleplate marked out ready for cutting the mouth. More handfiling than I have ever done since school has brought the edges to a decent state.

Roman Plane 7

Squaring up the mouth and filing the 65° angle.
Roman Plane 8
This has been the best history lesson I have had the pleasure to read since joining LJ's

Thanks for the post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Preparing some steelwork

It must be about four years since I first had a vague idea of reproducing this Roman plane from around the second century AD. The original has an ivory infill body, and is remarkably complete. I gained permission from the curator of the Guildhall Museum in Beverley, East Yorkshire, England, to take some measurements and photographs when the plane was removed from its environmentally controlled cabinet for its periodic inspection.

This blog is where I originally touched on the subject, and here is the finished project.

Roman Plane 1

Roman Plane 2

My method of construction is very very different from the craftsman of 1800 years ago (!) and is perhaps unorthodox, but it suits the materials I had around as well as the limited skills I possess, especially in the metalworking field. Blacksmithing certainly isn't in my repertoire, so I chose to fabricate the soleplate

Here, I have roughly cut the sheet steel and angle with a cutting disc in the angle grinder.

Roman Plane 3

Roman Plane 4

Beginning to rivet (and epoxy) the main soleplate components using the dome-headed rivets I had to hand. Countersunk ones would have been better.
Roman Plane 5

Ten rivets in place. The sole plate is set against the archaeologist's drawings of the original plane.

Roman Plane 6

The soleplate marked out ready for cutting the mouth. More handfiling than I have ever done since school has brought the edges to a decent state.

Roman Plane 7

Squaring up the mouth and filing the 65° angle.
Roman Plane 8
Thanks Kip (and everyone) for your comments.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Finishing the plane body

Ivory proved difficult to source <g>, so I chose a piece of sycamore that was to hand. I thought the colour wasn't too different & it's quite nice to work. Again deviating from the Roman approach I resawed and cut out the throat block, forming the quite steep 65° ramp.

Photobucket

The sycamore infill ready to try in its soleplate.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Removing the waste for the finger-holds.

Photobucket

And smoothing with shop-made sanding sticks.

Photobucket

Here the body is beginning to be shaped.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Modified coach-bolts are utilised as the body-to-soleplate securing rivets.

Photobucket

Photobucket
 

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26,886 Posts
Finishing the plane body

Ivory proved difficult to source <g>, so I chose a piece of sycamore that was to hand. I thought the colour wasn't too different & it's quite nice to work. Again deviating from the Roman approach I resawed and cut out the throat block, forming the quite steep 65° ramp.

Photobucket

The sycamore infill ready to try in its soleplate.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Removing the waste for the finger-holds.

Photobucket

And smoothing with shop-made sanding sticks.

Photobucket

Here the body is beginning to be shaped.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Modified coach-bolts are utilised as the body-to-soleplate securing rivets.

Photobucket

Photobucket
looking good Stewart.
 

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27,252 Posts
Finishing the plane body

Ivory proved difficult to source <g>, so I chose a piece of sycamore that was to hand. I thought the colour wasn't too different & it's quite nice to work. Again deviating from the Roman approach I resawed and cut out the throat block, forming the quite steep 65° ramp.

Photobucket

The sycamore infill ready to try in its soleplate.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Removing the waste for the finger-holds.

Photobucket

And smoothing with shop-made sanding sticks.

Photobucket

Here the body is beginning to be shaped.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Modified coach-bolts are utilised as the body-to-soleplate securing rivets.

Photobucket

Photobucket
This is really interesting.
 

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Finishing the plane body

Ivory proved difficult to source <g>, so I chose a piece of sycamore that was to hand. I thought the colour wasn't too different & it's quite nice to work. Again deviating from the Roman approach I resawed and cut out the throat block, forming the quite steep 65° ramp.

Photobucket

The sycamore infill ready to try in its soleplate.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Removing the waste for the finger-holds.

Photobucket

And smoothing with shop-made sanding sticks.

Photobucket

Here the body is beginning to be shaped.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Modified coach-bolts are utilised as the body-to-soleplate securing rivets.

Photobucket

Photobucket
this is looking great. its really coming along to!
 

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Finishing the plane body

Ivory proved difficult to source <g>, so I chose a piece of sycamore that was to hand. I thought the colour wasn't too different & it's quite nice to work. Again deviating from the Roman approach I resawed and cut out the throat block, forming the quite steep 65° ramp.

Photobucket

The sycamore infill ready to try in its soleplate.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Removing the waste for the finger-holds.

Photobucket

And smoothing with shop-made sanding sticks.

Photobucket

Here the body is beginning to be shaped.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Modified coach-bolts are utilised as the body-to-soleplate securing rivets.

Photobucket

Photobucket
Wonderful!
 
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