LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,505 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Let the games begin!

As some of you may have seen, I built a prototype of a small infill smoother (blog starts here). This went well enough that I decided to make one for myself from precision ground steel. Well, as it turns out, with the way lengths work for precision ground O1, I ended up buying enough for 3 small smoothers and 4 blades, which is perfect, since the prototype needs a blade.

So off went my money and a few days later, a package arrived with the steel, some new drill bits, and a scriber. A good scriber makes life so much easier when working with metal, and they are cheap enough that replacing them regularly is a good idea. The one I got was a whopping $1.50 or so. Anyway, here are the raw materials: 13/32"x1.5" O1 for the sole and 5/32"x2" O1 for the sides and blades (only one of the three lengths of O1 is shown). The infill will be from a Burmese blackwood turning blank I have had for a couple of years. I've never worked with it.

Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Tool


So the first thing to do was rough cut the sole pieces on the band saw. After that, I marked one side of each with Dykem so that I could scribe a center line. Then, using my calipers, I marked the location for each of the holes. The construction of these will differ slightly from the prototype in that I will be doing through pins. I decided to go this route because I found that using screws and peening them (if you find the right type) is still not as nice as peening plain rod. Also, plain rod is cheaper, and through holes made sense since I was drilling 1/2" from either side anyway, so I didn't have to worry about threading. Anway, after 20 or so minutes with the band saw, we have this:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Plank Gas


Lesson Learned!

So one thing I learned here is that you need to try to get your cuts as square as possible to start. I didn't, and it made me miserable later. Read on.

After getting stuff marked, it was time to drill. I ordered 3 new, high quality USA HSS drills for this project. I highly recommend you do the same. A new drill is like new socks: cheap, easy to not think about, but when you have it, you just smile and it makes you happier. So just do it. These were maybe a buck a piece. Anyway, for drilling, make sure to use plenty of cutting fluid, but not too much. Here is what I settled on and worked really well:

- Drill without any fluid just past the lip of the flute
- Fill the divot with cutting fluid, should only be about a drop
- Drill between 1/8"-3/16"
- Retract to clear the chips from both bit and workpiece
- Put in another drop of fluid
- Lather, rinse, repeat

Don't lay into the lever too hard. It will cause the drill to flex and not drill straight, ask me how I know. Luckily, over 1.5" I only had about 1/32-1/16" drift, so no big deal here. Here are the resulting pieces:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Gas Wood stain


Next up was rough cutting the infills. This resulted in another

Lesson Learned!

Make sure your infill stock is all square (yes, all four sides) and just slightly oversized (I shot for about 1/16" in width and about 5/16" in height so as to round it over nicely). I did not, and it came back to bite me later. This, in conjunction with the not square bandsaw cuts made life hard. Read on, good reader.

So I originally anticipated having the sapwood run the same on all the pieces. Well, then I got the idea that it would be more efficient to use common angled cuts, meaning one cut at 60 degrees and one at 90 would get me two 60 degree pieces. Well, this also makes it so that the sapwood is in different locations. It will be fine, but I could have thought it through better. Here it is after rough cuts:

Wood Tool Gas Rectangle Hardwood


Then it was time to lap everything in nice and square. I did the same as on the prototype: two F clamps with a little bit of wood overhanging each side and the slightest bit protruding over the ramp, like so:

Wood Gas Bumper Flooring Hardwood


Now here is where stuff came back to bite me. I realized that because stuff wasn't level and square, I would have to lap it in. I blew through 4 sheets of 80 grit and half a sheet of 100 grit, totaling about 2 hours of solid lapping. I bruised some fingers just from all the pressure. In fact, after 1 hour 45 minutes, I was still way far off. Then I thought "I've already lapped one side square to the bottom, so I could just put it on that side and use my oscillating belt sander (ROSS) to do the bulk of the work". The ROSS doesn't sand perfectly flat or square, but a whole lot closer than trying to lap by hand, especially after all the arm and ab muscles were totally exhausted. 15 minutes with the 100 and 180 grit belts, and I was in good shape, though I continued to check with a small machinists square just to make sure. I finished out by lapping with some 220 grit to remove any burrs and other scratches. No picture, as it doesn't look any different in a photo.

I also cut one 18" length of the side material down to width on the bandsaw. I will need to clean it up, but O1 actually cuts pretty nicely in its annealed state.

So, that is where we end for today. But remember MAKE SURE EVERYTHING IS CUT AS SQUARE AS POSSIBLE PRIOR TO LAPPING OR ANYTHING ELSE, OR ELSE!

Time to this point: ~4 hours
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,233 Posts
Let the games begin!

As some of you may have seen, I built a prototype of a small infill smoother (blog starts here). This went well enough that I decided to make one for myself from precision ground steel. Well, as it turns out, with the way lengths work for precision ground O1, I ended up buying enough for 3 small smoothers and 4 blades, which is perfect, since the prototype needs a blade.

So off went my money and a few days later, a package arrived with the steel, some new drill bits, and a scriber. A good scriber makes life so much easier when working with metal, and they are cheap enough that replacing them regularly is a good idea. The one I got was a whopping $1.50 or so. Anyway, here are the raw materials: 13/32"x1.5" O1 for the sole and 5/32"x2" O1 for the sides and blades (only one of the three lengths of O1 is shown). The infill will be from a Burmese blackwood turning blank I have had for a couple of years. I've never worked with it.

Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Tool


So the first thing to do was rough cut the sole pieces on the band saw. After that, I marked one side of each with Dykem so that I could scribe a center line. Then, using my calipers, I marked the location for each of the holes. The construction of these will differ slightly from the prototype in that I will be doing through pins. I decided to go this route because I found that using screws and peening them (if you find the right type) is still not as nice as peening plain rod. Also, plain rod is cheaper, and through holes made sense since I was drilling 1/2" from either side anyway, so I didn't have to worry about threading. Anway, after 20 or so minutes with the band saw, we have this:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Plank Gas


Lesson Learned!

So one thing I learned here is that you need to try to get your cuts as square as possible to start. I didn't, and it made me miserable later. Read on.

After getting stuff marked, it was time to drill. I ordered 3 new, high quality USA HSS drills for this project. I highly recommend you do the same. A new drill is like new socks: cheap, easy to not think about, but when you have it, you just smile and it makes you happier. So just do it. These were maybe a buck a piece. Anyway, for drilling, make sure to use plenty of cutting fluid, but not too much. Here is what I settled on and worked really well:

- Drill without any fluid just past the lip of the flute
- Fill the divot with cutting fluid, should only be about a drop
- Drill between 1/8"-3/16"
- Retract to clear the chips from both bit and workpiece
- Put in another drop of fluid
- Lather, rinse, repeat

Don't lay into the lever too hard. It will cause the drill to flex and not drill straight, ask me how I know. Luckily, over 1.5" I only had about 1/32-1/16" drift, so no big deal here. Here are the resulting pieces:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Gas Wood stain


Next up was rough cutting the infills. This resulted in another

Lesson Learned!

Make sure your infill stock is all square (yes, all four sides) and just slightly oversized (I shot for about 1/16" in width and about 5/16" in height so as to round it over nicely). I did not, and it came back to bite me later. This, in conjunction with the not square bandsaw cuts made life hard. Read on, good reader.

So I originally anticipated having the sapwood run the same on all the pieces. Well, then I got the idea that it would be more efficient to use common angled cuts, meaning one cut at 60 degrees and one at 90 would get me two 60 degree pieces. Well, this also makes it so that the sapwood is in different locations. It will be fine, but I could have thought it through better. Here it is after rough cuts:

Wood Tool Gas Rectangle Hardwood


Then it was time to lap everything in nice and square. I did the same as on the prototype: two F clamps with a little bit of wood overhanging each side and the slightest bit protruding over the ramp, like so:

Wood Gas Bumper Flooring Hardwood


Now here is where stuff came back to bite me. I realized that because stuff wasn't level and square, I would have to lap it in. I blew through 4 sheets of 80 grit and half a sheet of 100 grit, totaling about 2 hours of solid lapping. I bruised some fingers just from all the pressure. In fact, after 1 hour 45 minutes, I was still way far off. Then I thought "I've already lapped one side square to the bottom, so I could just put it on that side and use my oscillating belt sander (ROSS) to do the bulk of the work". The ROSS doesn't sand perfectly flat or square, but a whole lot closer than trying to lap by hand, especially after all the arm and ab muscles were totally exhausted. 15 minutes with the 100 and 180 grit belts, and I was in good shape, though I continued to check with a small machinists square just to make sure. I finished out by lapping with some 220 grit to remove any burrs and other scratches. No picture, as it doesn't look any different in a photo.

I also cut one 18" length of the side material down to width on the bandsaw. I will need to clean it up, but O1 actually cuts pretty nicely in its annealed state.

So, that is where we end for today. But remember MAKE SURE EVERYTHING IS CUT AS SQUARE AS POSSIBLE PRIOR TO LAPPING OR ANYTHING ELSE, OR ELSE!

Time to this point: ~4 hours
Very interesting!

Thank you for posting…

COOL work…
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,611 Posts
Let the games begin!

As some of you may have seen, I built a prototype of a small infill smoother (blog starts here). This went well enough that I decided to make one for myself from precision ground steel. Well, as it turns out, with the way lengths work for precision ground O1, I ended up buying enough for 3 small smoothers and 4 blades, which is perfect, since the prototype needs a blade.

So off went my money and a few days later, a package arrived with the steel, some new drill bits, and a scriber. A good scriber makes life so much easier when working with metal, and they are cheap enough that replacing them regularly is a good idea. The one I got was a whopping $1.50 or so. Anyway, here are the raw materials: 13/32"x1.5" O1 for the sole and 5/32"x2" O1 for the sides and blades (only one of the three lengths of O1 is shown). The infill will be from a Burmese blackwood turning blank I have had for a couple of years. I've never worked with it.

Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Tool


So the first thing to do was rough cut the sole pieces on the band saw. After that, I marked one side of each with Dykem so that I could scribe a center line. Then, using my calipers, I marked the location for each of the holes. The construction of these will differ slightly from the prototype in that I will be doing through pins. I decided to go this route because I found that using screws and peening them (if you find the right type) is still not as nice as peening plain rod. Also, plain rod is cheaper, and through holes made sense since I was drilling 1/2" from either side anyway, so I didn't have to worry about threading. Anway, after 20 or so minutes with the band saw, we have this:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Plank Gas


Lesson Learned!

So one thing I learned here is that you need to try to get your cuts as square as possible to start. I didn't, and it made me miserable later. Read on.

After getting stuff marked, it was time to drill. I ordered 3 new, high quality USA HSS drills for this project. I highly recommend you do the same. A new drill is like new socks: cheap, easy to not think about, but when you have it, you just smile and it makes you happier. So just do it. These were maybe a buck a piece. Anyway, for drilling, make sure to use plenty of cutting fluid, but not too much. Here is what I settled on and worked really well:

- Drill without any fluid just past the lip of the flute
- Fill the divot with cutting fluid, should only be about a drop
- Drill between 1/8"-3/16"
- Retract to clear the chips from both bit and workpiece
- Put in another drop of fluid
- Lather, rinse, repeat

Don't lay into the lever too hard. It will cause the drill to flex and not drill straight, ask me how I know. Luckily, over 1.5" I only had about 1/32-1/16" drift, so no big deal here. Here are the resulting pieces:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Gas Wood stain


Next up was rough cutting the infills. This resulted in another

Lesson Learned!

Make sure your infill stock is all square (yes, all four sides) and just slightly oversized (I shot for about 1/16" in width and about 5/16" in height so as to round it over nicely). I did not, and it came back to bite me later. This, in conjunction with the not square bandsaw cuts made life hard. Read on, good reader.

So I originally anticipated having the sapwood run the same on all the pieces. Well, then I got the idea that it would be more efficient to use common angled cuts, meaning one cut at 60 degrees and one at 90 would get me two 60 degree pieces. Well, this also makes it so that the sapwood is in different locations. It will be fine, but I could have thought it through better. Here it is after rough cuts:

Wood Tool Gas Rectangle Hardwood


Then it was time to lap everything in nice and square. I did the same as on the prototype: two F clamps with a little bit of wood overhanging each side and the slightest bit protruding over the ramp, like so:

Wood Gas Bumper Flooring Hardwood


Now here is where stuff came back to bite me. I realized that because stuff wasn't level and square, I would have to lap it in. I blew through 4 sheets of 80 grit and half a sheet of 100 grit, totaling about 2 hours of solid lapping. I bruised some fingers just from all the pressure. In fact, after 1 hour 45 minutes, I was still way far off. Then I thought "I've already lapped one side square to the bottom, so I could just put it on that side and use my oscillating belt sander (ROSS) to do the bulk of the work". The ROSS doesn't sand perfectly flat or square, but a whole lot closer than trying to lap by hand, especially after all the arm and ab muscles were totally exhausted. 15 minutes with the 100 and 180 grit belts, and I was in good shape, though I continued to check with a small machinists square just to make sure. I finished out by lapping with some 220 grit to remove any burrs and other scratches. No picture, as it doesn't look any different in a photo.

I also cut one 18" length of the side material down to width on the bandsaw. I will need to clean it up, but O1 actually cuts pretty nicely in its annealed state.

So, that is where we end for today. But remember MAKE SURE EVERYTHING IS CUT AS SQUARE AS POSSIBLE PRIOR TO LAPPING OR ANYTHING ELSE, OR ELSE!

Time to this point: ~4 hours
they're gonna be nice!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,747 Posts
Let the games begin!

As some of you may have seen, I built a prototype of a small infill smoother (blog starts here). This went well enough that I decided to make one for myself from precision ground steel. Well, as it turns out, with the way lengths work for precision ground O1, I ended up buying enough for 3 small smoothers and 4 blades, which is perfect, since the prototype needs a blade.

So off went my money and a few days later, a package arrived with the steel, some new drill bits, and a scriber. A good scriber makes life so much easier when working with metal, and they are cheap enough that replacing them regularly is a good idea. The one I got was a whopping $1.50 or so. Anyway, here are the raw materials: 13/32"x1.5" O1 for the sole and 5/32"x2" O1 for the sides and blades (only one of the three lengths of O1 is shown). The infill will be from a Burmese blackwood turning blank I have had for a couple of years. I've never worked with it.

Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Tool


So the first thing to do was rough cut the sole pieces on the band saw. After that, I marked one side of each with Dykem so that I could scribe a center line. Then, using my calipers, I marked the location for each of the holes. The construction of these will differ slightly from the prototype in that I will be doing through pins. I decided to go this route because I found that using screws and peening them (if you find the right type) is still not as nice as peening plain rod. Also, plain rod is cheaper, and through holes made sense since I was drilling 1/2" from either side anyway, so I didn't have to worry about threading. Anway, after 20 or so minutes with the band saw, we have this:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Plank Gas


Lesson Learned!

So one thing I learned here is that you need to try to get your cuts as square as possible to start. I didn't, and it made me miserable later. Read on.

After getting stuff marked, it was time to drill. I ordered 3 new, high quality USA HSS drills for this project. I highly recommend you do the same. A new drill is like new socks: cheap, easy to not think about, but when you have it, you just smile and it makes you happier. So just do it. These were maybe a buck a piece. Anyway, for drilling, make sure to use plenty of cutting fluid, but not too much. Here is what I settled on and worked really well:

- Drill without any fluid just past the lip of the flute
- Fill the divot with cutting fluid, should only be about a drop
- Drill between 1/8"-3/16"
- Retract to clear the chips from both bit and workpiece
- Put in another drop of fluid
- Lather, rinse, repeat

Don't lay into the lever too hard. It will cause the drill to flex and not drill straight, ask me how I know. Luckily, over 1.5" I only had about 1/32-1/16" drift, so no big deal here. Here are the resulting pieces:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Gas Wood stain


Next up was rough cutting the infills. This resulted in another

Lesson Learned!

Make sure your infill stock is all square (yes, all four sides) and just slightly oversized (I shot for about 1/16" in width and about 5/16" in height so as to round it over nicely). I did not, and it came back to bite me later. This, in conjunction with the not square bandsaw cuts made life hard. Read on, good reader.

So I originally anticipated having the sapwood run the same on all the pieces. Well, then I got the idea that it would be more efficient to use common angled cuts, meaning one cut at 60 degrees and one at 90 would get me two 60 degree pieces. Well, this also makes it so that the sapwood is in different locations. It will be fine, but I could have thought it through better. Here it is after rough cuts:

Wood Tool Gas Rectangle Hardwood


Then it was time to lap everything in nice and square. I did the same as on the prototype: two F clamps with a little bit of wood overhanging each side and the slightest bit protruding over the ramp, like so:

Wood Gas Bumper Flooring Hardwood


Now here is where stuff came back to bite me. I realized that because stuff wasn't level and square, I would have to lap it in. I blew through 4 sheets of 80 grit and half a sheet of 100 grit, totaling about 2 hours of solid lapping. I bruised some fingers just from all the pressure. In fact, after 1 hour 45 minutes, I was still way far off. Then I thought "I've already lapped one side square to the bottom, so I could just put it on that side and use my oscillating belt sander (ROSS) to do the bulk of the work". The ROSS doesn't sand perfectly flat or square, but a whole lot closer than trying to lap by hand, especially after all the arm and ab muscles were totally exhausted. 15 minutes with the 100 and 180 grit belts, and I was in good shape, though I continued to check with a small machinists square just to make sure. I finished out by lapping with some 220 grit to remove any burrs and other scratches. No picture, as it doesn't look any different in a photo.

I also cut one 18" length of the side material down to width on the bandsaw. I will need to clean it up, but O1 actually cuts pretty nicely in its annealed state.

So, that is where we end for today. But remember MAKE SURE EVERYTHING IS CUT AS SQUARE AS POSSIBLE PRIOR TO LAPPING OR ANYTHING ELSE, OR ELSE!

Time to this point: ~4 hours
Oh my, looks like a ton of work ahead for me, too!
Thanks a million for the lessons!!!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,115 Posts
Let the games begin!

As some of you may have seen, I built a prototype of a small infill smoother (blog starts here). This went well enough that I decided to make one for myself from precision ground steel. Well, as it turns out, with the way lengths work for precision ground O1, I ended up buying enough for 3 small smoothers and 4 blades, which is perfect, since the prototype needs a blade.

So off went my money and a few days later, a package arrived with the steel, some new drill bits, and a scriber. A good scriber makes life so much easier when working with metal, and they are cheap enough that replacing them regularly is a good idea. The one I got was a whopping $1.50 or so. Anyway, here are the raw materials: 13/32"x1.5" O1 for the sole and 5/32"x2" O1 for the sides and blades (only one of the three lengths of O1 is shown). The infill will be from a Burmese blackwood turning blank I have had for a couple of years. I've never worked with it.

Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Tool


So the first thing to do was rough cut the sole pieces on the band saw. After that, I marked one side of each with Dykem so that I could scribe a center line. Then, using my calipers, I marked the location for each of the holes. The construction of these will differ slightly from the prototype in that I will be doing through pins. I decided to go this route because I found that using screws and peening them (if you find the right type) is still not as nice as peening plain rod. Also, plain rod is cheaper, and through holes made sense since I was drilling 1/2" from either side anyway, so I didn't have to worry about threading. Anway, after 20 or so minutes with the band saw, we have this:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Plank Gas


Lesson Learned!

So one thing I learned here is that you need to try to get your cuts as square as possible to start. I didn't, and it made me miserable later. Read on.

After getting stuff marked, it was time to drill. I ordered 3 new, high quality USA HSS drills for this project. I highly recommend you do the same. A new drill is like new socks: cheap, easy to not think about, but when you have it, you just smile and it makes you happier. So just do it. These were maybe a buck a piece. Anyway, for drilling, make sure to use plenty of cutting fluid, but not too much. Here is what I settled on and worked really well:

- Drill without any fluid just past the lip of the flute
- Fill the divot with cutting fluid, should only be about a drop
- Drill between 1/8"-3/16"
- Retract to clear the chips from both bit and workpiece
- Put in another drop of fluid
- Lather, rinse, repeat

Don't lay into the lever too hard. It will cause the drill to flex and not drill straight, ask me how I know. Luckily, over 1.5" I only had about 1/32-1/16" drift, so no big deal here. Here are the resulting pieces:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Gas Wood stain


Next up was rough cutting the infills. This resulted in another

Lesson Learned!

Make sure your infill stock is all square (yes, all four sides) and just slightly oversized (I shot for about 1/16" in width and about 5/16" in height so as to round it over nicely). I did not, and it came back to bite me later. This, in conjunction with the not square bandsaw cuts made life hard. Read on, good reader.

So I originally anticipated having the sapwood run the same on all the pieces. Well, then I got the idea that it would be more efficient to use common angled cuts, meaning one cut at 60 degrees and one at 90 would get me two 60 degree pieces. Well, this also makes it so that the sapwood is in different locations. It will be fine, but I could have thought it through better. Here it is after rough cuts:

Wood Tool Gas Rectangle Hardwood


Then it was time to lap everything in nice and square. I did the same as on the prototype: two F clamps with a little bit of wood overhanging each side and the slightest bit protruding over the ramp, like so:

Wood Gas Bumper Flooring Hardwood


Now here is where stuff came back to bite me. I realized that because stuff wasn't level and square, I would have to lap it in. I blew through 4 sheets of 80 grit and half a sheet of 100 grit, totaling about 2 hours of solid lapping. I bruised some fingers just from all the pressure. In fact, after 1 hour 45 minutes, I was still way far off. Then I thought "I've already lapped one side square to the bottom, so I could just put it on that side and use my oscillating belt sander (ROSS) to do the bulk of the work". The ROSS doesn't sand perfectly flat or square, but a whole lot closer than trying to lap by hand, especially after all the arm and ab muscles were totally exhausted. 15 minutes with the 100 and 180 grit belts, and I was in good shape, though I continued to check with a small machinists square just to make sure. I finished out by lapping with some 220 grit to remove any burrs and other scratches. No picture, as it doesn't look any different in a photo.

I also cut one 18" length of the side material down to width on the bandsaw. I will need to clean it up, but O1 actually cuts pretty nicely in its annealed state.

So, that is where we end for today. But remember MAKE SURE EVERYTHING IS CUT AS SQUARE AS POSSIBLE PRIOR TO LAPPING OR ANYTHING ELSE, OR ELSE!

Time to this point: ~4 hours
They should be really nice
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Let the games begin!

As some of you may have seen, I built a prototype of a small infill smoother (blog starts here). This went well enough that I decided to make one for myself from precision ground steel. Well, as it turns out, with the way lengths work for precision ground O1, I ended up buying enough for 3 small smoothers and 4 blades, which is perfect, since the prototype needs a blade.

So off went my money and a few days later, a package arrived with the steel, some new drill bits, and a scriber. A good scriber makes life so much easier when working with metal, and they are cheap enough that replacing them regularly is a good idea. The one I got was a whopping $1.50 or so. Anyway, here are the raw materials: 13/32"x1.5" O1 for the sole and 5/32"x2" O1 for the sides and blades (only one of the three lengths of O1 is shown). The infill will be from a Burmese blackwood turning blank I have had for a couple of years. I've never worked with it.

Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Tool


So the first thing to do was rough cut the sole pieces on the band saw. After that, I marked one side of each with Dykem so that I could scribe a center line. Then, using my calipers, I marked the location for each of the holes. The construction of these will differ slightly from the prototype in that I will be doing through pins. I decided to go this route because I found that using screws and peening them (if you find the right type) is still not as nice as peening plain rod. Also, plain rod is cheaper, and through holes made sense since I was drilling 1/2" from either side anyway, so I didn't have to worry about threading. Anway, after 20 or so minutes with the band saw, we have this:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Plank Gas


Lesson Learned!

So one thing I learned here is that you need to try to get your cuts as square as possible to start. I didn't, and it made me miserable later. Read on.

After getting stuff marked, it was time to drill. I ordered 3 new, high quality USA HSS drills for this project. I highly recommend you do the same. A new drill is like new socks: cheap, easy to not think about, but when you have it, you just smile and it makes you happier. So just do it. These were maybe a buck a piece. Anyway, for drilling, make sure to use plenty of cutting fluid, but not too much. Here is what I settled on and worked really well:

- Drill without any fluid just past the lip of the flute
- Fill the divot with cutting fluid, should only be about a drop
- Drill between 1/8"-3/16"
- Retract to clear the chips from both bit and workpiece
- Put in another drop of fluid
- Lather, rinse, repeat

Don't lay into the lever too hard. It will cause the drill to flex and not drill straight, ask me how I know. Luckily, over 1.5" I only had about 1/32-1/16" drift, so no big deal here. Here are the resulting pieces:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Gas Wood stain


Next up was rough cutting the infills. This resulted in another

Lesson Learned!

Make sure your infill stock is all square (yes, all four sides) and just slightly oversized (I shot for about 1/16" in width and about 5/16" in height so as to round it over nicely). I did not, and it came back to bite me later. This, in conjunction with the not square bandsaw cuts made life hard. Read on, good reader.

So I originally anticipated having the sapwood run the same on all the pieces. Well, then I got the idea that it would be more efficient to use common angled cuts, meaning one cut at 60 degrees and one at 90 would get me two 60 degree pieces. Well, this also makes it so that the sapwood is in different locations. It will be fine, but I could have thought it through better. Here it is after rough cuts:

Wood Tool Gas Rectangle Hardwood


Then it was time to lap everything in nice and square. I did the same as on the prototype: two F clamps with a little bit of wood overhanging each side and the slightest bit protruding over the ramp, like so:

Wood Gas Bumper Flooring Hardwood


Now here is where stuff came back to bite me. I realized that because stuff wasn't level and square, I would have to lap it in. I blew through 4 sheets of 80 grit and half a sheet of 100 grit, totaling about 2 hours of solid lapping. I bruised some fingers just from all the pressure. In fact, after 1 hour 45 minutes, I was still way far off. Then I thought "I've already lapped one side square to the bottom, so I could just put it on that side and use my oscillating belt sander (ROSS) to do the bulk of the work". The ROSS doesn't sand perfectly flat or square, but a whole lot closer than trying to lap by hand, especially after all the arm and ab muscles were totally exhausted. 15 minutes with the 100 and 180 grit belts, and I was in good shape, though I continued to check with a small machinists square just to make sure. I finished out by lapping with some 220 grit to remove any burrs and other scratches. No picture, as it doesn't look any different in a photo.

I also cut one 18" length of the side material down to width on the bandsaw. I will need to clean it up, but O1 actually cuts pretty nicely in its annealed state.

So, that is where we end for today. But remember MAKE SURE EVERYTHING IS CUT AS SQUARE AS POSSIBLE PRIOR TO LAPPING OR ANYTHING ELSE, OR ELSE!

Time to this point: ~4 hours
Great blog! Where did you buy your steel?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,505 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Let the games begin!

As some of you may have seen, I built a prototype of a small infill smoother (blog starts here). This went well enough that I decided to make one for myself from precision ground steel. Well, as it turns out, with the way lengths work for precision ground O1, I ended up buying enough for 3 small smoothers and 4 blades, which is perfect, since the prototype needs a blade.

So off went my money and a few days later, a package arrived with the steel, some new drill bits, and a scriber. A good scriber makes life so much easier when working with metal, and they are cheap enough that replacing them regularly is a good idea. The one I got was a whopping $1.50 or so. Anyway, here are the raw materials: 13/32"x1.5" O1 for the sole and 5/32"x2" O1 for the sides and blades (only one of the three lengths of O1 is shown). The infill will be from a Burmese blackwood turning blank I have had for a couple of years. I've never worked with it.

Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Tool


So the first thing to do was rough cut the sole pieces on the band saw. After that, I marked one side of each with Dykem so that I could scribe a center line. Then, using my calipers, I marked the location for each of the holes. The construction of these will differ slightly from the prototype in that I will be doing through pins. I decided to go this route because I found that using screws and peening them (if you find the right type) is still not as nice as peening plain rod. Also, plain rod is cheaper, and through holes made sense since I was drilling 1/2" from either side anyway, so I didn't have to worry about threading. Anway, after 20 or so minutes with the band saw, we have this:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Plank Gas


Lesson Learned!

So one thing I learned here is that you need to try to get your cuts as square as possible to start. I didn't, and it made me miserable later. Read on.

After getting stuff marked, it was time to drill. I ordered 3 new, high quality USA HSS drills for this project. I highly recommend you do the same. A new drill is like new socks: cheap, easy to not think about, but when you have it, you just smile and it makes you happier. So just do it. These were maybe a buck a piece. Anyway, for drilling, make sure to use plenty of cutting fluid, but not too much. Here is what I settled on and worked really well:

- Drill without any fluid just past the lip of the flute
- Fill the divot with cutting fluid, should only be about a drop
- Drill between 1/8"-3/16"
- Retract to clear the chips from both bit and workpiece
- Put in another drop of fluid
- Lather, rinse, repeat

Don't lay into the lever too hard. It will cause the drill to flex and not drill straight, ask me how I know. Luckily, over 1.5" I only had about 1/32-1/16" drift, so no big deal here. Here are the resulting pieces:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Gas Wood stain


Next up was rough cutting the infills. This resulted in another

Lesson Learned!

Make sure your infill stock is all square (yes, all four sides) and just slightly oversized (I shot for about 1/16" in width and about 5/16" in height so as to round it over nicely). I did not, and it came back to bite me later. This, in conjunction with the not square bandsaw cuts made life hard. Read on, good reader.

So I originally anticipated having the sapwood run the same on all the pieces. Well, then I got the idea that it would be more efficient to use common angled cuts, meaning one cut at 60 degrees and one at 90 would get me two 60 degree pieces. Well, this also makes it so that the sapwood is in different locations. It will be fine, but I could have thought it through better. Here it is after rough cuts:

Wood Tool Gas Rectangle Hardwood


Then it was time to lap everything in nice and square. I did the same as on the prototype: two F clamps with a little bit of wood overhanging each side and the slightest bit protruding over the ramp, like so:

Wood Gas Bumper Flooring Hardwood


Now here is where stuff came back to bite me. I realized that because stuff wasn't level and square, I would have to lap it in. I blew through 4 sheets of 80 grit and half a sheet of 100 grit, totaling about 2 hours of solid lapping. I bruised some fingers just from all the pressure. In fact, after 1 hour 45 minutes, I was still way far off. Then I thought "I've already lapped one side square to the bottom, so I could just put it on that side and use my oscillating belt sander (ROSS) to do the bulk of the work". The ROSS doesn't sand perfectly flat or square, but a whole lot closer than trying to lap by hand, especially after all the arm and ab muscles were totally exhausted. 15 minutes with the 100 and 180 grit belts, and I was in good shape, though I continued to check with a small machinists square just to make sure. I finished out by lapping with some 220 grit to remove any burrs and other scratches. No picture, as it doesn't look any different in a photo.

I also cut one 18" length of the side material down to width on the bandsaw. I will need to clean it up, but O1 actually cuts pretty nicely in its annealed state.

So, that is where we end for today. But remember MAKE SURE EVERYTHING IS CUT AS SQUARE AS POSSIBLE PRIOR TO LAPPING OR ANYTHING ELSE, OR ELSE!

Time to this point: ~4 hours
Ethan, steel was purchased from Enco. If you catch a 20% off sale with free shipping, it is significantly cheaper. They have that deal today until 11 PM. PM me if you want the codes.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Let the games begin!

As some of you may have seen, I built a prototype of a small infill smoother (blog starts here). This went well enough that I decided to make one for myself from precision ground steel. Well, as it turns out, with the way lengths work for precision ground O1, I ended up buying enough for 3 small smoothers and 4 blades, which is perfect, since the prototype needs a blade.

So off went my money and a few days later, a package arrived with the steel, some new drill bits, and a scriber. A good scriber makes life so much easier when working with metal, and they are cheap enough that replacing them regularly is a good idea. The one I got was a whopping $1.50 or so. Anyway, here are the raw materials: 13/32"x1.5" O1 for the sole and 5/32"x2" O1 for the sides and blades (only one of the three lengths of O1 is shown). The infill will be from a Burmese blackwood turning blank I have had for a couple of years. I've never worked with it.

Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Tool


So the first thing to do was rough cut the sole pieces on the band saw. After that, I marked one side of each with Dykem so that I could scribe a center line. Then, using my calipers, I marked the location for each of the holes. The construction of these will differ slightly from the prototype in that I will be doing through pins. I decided to go this route because I found that using screws and peening them (if you find the right type) is still not as nice as peening plain rod. Also, plain rod is cheaper, and through holes made sense since I was drilling 1/2" from either side anyway, so I didn't have to worry about threading. Anway, after 20 or so minutes with the band saw, we have this:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Plank Gas


Lesson Learned!

So one thing I learned here is that you need to try to get your cuts as square as possible to start. I didn't, and it made me miserable later. Read on.

After getting stuff marked, it was time to drill. I ordered 3 new, high quality USA HSS drills for this project. I highly recommend you do the same. A new drill is like new socks: cheap, easy to not think about, but when you have it, you just smile and it makes you happier. So just do it. These were maybe a buck a piece. Anyway, for drilling, make sure to use plenty of cutting fluid, but not too much. Here is what I settled on and worked really well:

- Drill without any fluid just past the lip of the flute
- Fill the divot with cutting fluid, should only be about a drop
- Drill between 1/8"-3/16"
- Retract to clear the chips from both bit and workpiece
- Put in another drop of fluid
- Lather, rinse, repeat

Don't lay into the lever too hard. It will cause the drill to flex and not drill straight, ask me how I know. Luckily, over 1.5" I only had about 1/32-1/16" drift, so no big deal here. Here are the resulting pieces:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Gas Wood stain


Next up was rough cutting the infills. This resulted in another

Lesson Learned!

Make sure your infill stock is all square (yes, all four sides) and just slightly oversized (I shot for about 1/16" in width and about 5/16" in height so as to round it over nicely). I did not, and it came back to bite me later. This, in conjunction with the not square bandsaw cuts made life hard. Read on, good reader.

So I originally anticipated having the sapwood run the same on all the pieces. Well, then I got the idea that it would be more efficient to use common angled cuts, meaning one cut at 60 degrees and one at 90 would get me two 60 degree pieces. Well, this also makes it so that the sapwood is in different locations. It will be fine, but I could have thought it through better. Here it is after rough cuts:

Wood Tool Gas Rectangle Hardwood


Then it was time to lap everything in nice and square. I did the same as on the prototype: two F clamps with a little bit of wood overhanging each side and the slightest bit protruding over the ramp, like so:

Wood Gas Bumper Flooring Hardwood


Now here is where stuff came back to bite me. I realized that because stuff wasn't level and square, I would have to lap it in. I blew through 4 sheets of 80 grit and half a sheet of 100 grit, totaling about 2 hours of solid lapping. I bruised some fingers just from all the pressure. In fact, after 1 hour 45 minutes, I was still way far off. Then I thought "I've already lapped one side square to the bottom, so I could just put it on that side and use my oscillating belt sander (ROSS) to do the bulk of the work". The ROSS doesn't sand perfectly flat or square, but a whole lot closer than trying to lap by hand, especially after all the arm and ab muscles were totally exhausted. 15 minutes with the 100 and 180 grit belts, and I was in good shape, though I continued to check with a small machinists square just to make sure. I finished out by lapping with some 220 grit to remove any burrs and other scratches. No picture, as it doesn't look any different in a photo.

I also cut one 18" length of the side material down to width on the bandsaw. I will need to clean it up, but O1 actually cuts pretty nicely in its annealed state.

So, that is where we end for today. But remember MAKE SURE EVERYTHING IS CUT AS SQUARE AS POSSIBLE PRIOR TO LAPPING OR ANYTHING ELSE, OR ELSE!

Time to this point: ~4 hours
I don't think I'll be purchasing it any time soon, but thanks for the info.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,505 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Making Strides

My wife is out of town for the weekend and I have three little children. However, I took a half day Friday (so I could be around to get kids from school) which gave me some time during the youngest's nap, as well as my normal after bedtime shop time. Plus, I was able to get a few hours Saturday as well. Couple that with lots of thinking about process refinements, and lots of progress has been made.

First, I cut side pieces to width and length. The belt sander gave roughly straight edges afterwards. I also got a couple of blades cut. I need these so that I can set the appropriate spacing between the toe and other sole piece. To cut the blades, I cut a 25 degree angle on a piece of 2×4 and put it in the band saw like so:

Wood Gas Machine tool Machine Tool


This was a little precarious, but it worked, ish. Here you can see that it did not cut square top to bottom, and I knew such would be the case with how it was set up:

Brown Wood Rectangle Flooring Wood stain


A little bit of time with the belt sander gave me this:

Window Wood Rectangle Floor Flooring


I realized afterwards that I could have gotten it even more square using one of my little angle plates to keep it vertical instead of a cutoff piece of scrap, but oh well. I will use a honing guide and small square later anyway. I did use the angle plate on the toe of one of the planes. It turns out that the sides were too short for the hole spacing I had:

Wood Netbook Gadget Flooring Floor


The toes are short, so my band saw needed a little help so that I could cut off about 1/8" from the length:

Wood Bumper Gas Metal Automotive exterior


This allowed me to get the end rivet well inside of the side piece, like so:

Wood Netbook Gadget Flooring Floor


As you can see, I used my drill press table to set this all up. I put the sole pieces on a .003" thick piece of shim stock so that the sides would project downward .003" past the sole to make lapping the sole easier. I used a clamp to keep the bedding infill such that I can put in the blade, position the toe, spring clamp the toe, remove the bedding infill, and superglue the side piece on. I did this for both planes. However, before gluing I used a countersink to very lightly countersink the holes in the sole pieces so that the pieces would make up well. Here you can see just how much I countersunk the holes:

Wood Automotive exterior Hardwood Wood stain Gas


Then, after the glue dried, I used a transfer punch to mark out for holes. Here is where the folly of through rivets on a wider plane come in. Many of the holes were not drilled perfectly straight and plumb due to things like drill bit deflection and the like. This meant that some holes were on an angle, but the transfer punch only marks the center of the hole on the side pieces. So the side pieces got drilled square instead of on the same angle as the hole in the sole. This makes alignment imperfect. So needless to say, if I do another one of these, it will be with peened screws and not through rivets.

Peening

After getting the holes drilled on all the side pieces, it was time to think of peening. First, a test fit:

Wood Rectangle Bumper Automotive exterior Flooring


I needed to use some 320 to clean up the mating surfaces prior to peening. This is to ensure as seamless of a joint as possible. I also reamed all of the holes and actually lightly countersunk each of them as well. A few of the holes did not line up well, so I had to use the dremel to enlarge a couple of holes. Just make sure to take your time peening. It is a painful experience to your forearm, so take frequent breaks. Also, make sure to work the rivet with a few hits in the center, then a few around the edges, and then back to the center. This will smoosh it out nicely. Don't try to power through if your arm is tired, as this will only result in stray hammer hits that need to be sanded out later.

Shaping the toe and heel

After peening, we need to shape the curve on the heel and toe prior to putting in the infill. This makes life easy. Using the glorious 40 grit blue belt on the sander, it took me perhaps half an hour or so to get the curves all shaped.

After not much time, both planes looked like this:

Rectangle Wood Automotive exterior Brick Wood stain


Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Plywood


Inserting Infills

I left the infills a little large on purpose. This lets me work them down to fit nicely. My sides and soles were not 100% square, but most were really close. So I used 100 grit to lap each infill down until it fit well. Good fresh paper made this about a 15 minute job. However, you still want to be careful. I cut some grooves in the wood to give the epoxy someplace to grab. I also put a concavity on the front infill to "help" with chip ejection (I say "help" because I have no idea if it actually works, but it also gives it a more elegant look).

When epoxying in the infills, I used a plane adjusting hammer and scraps to make sure infills were placed correctly. The infills were a good snug fit and a C clamp was used a couple times to get rid of gaps. Make sure you dry fit everything a couple times prior to glue up, as you get only one chance at this. Here is what they look like:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Adhesive


Once the epoxy is set, I used the band saw to cut off the waste near the curves on the heel and toe. I flipped each plane on its infill so that I could cut closely. Then I used the blue belt to sand it flush. That was followed by an 80 and 180 grit belts.

  • Final Shaping*

This is kind of an ongoing stage, but I marked the center line on each plane and started shaping the arc of the top of the plane. I originally thought I would have the arc peak at 3/16" higher than the sides, but this was too much of an arc. So I kept going by eye. I also sanded off (using the 40 grit belt) the rivets. This was followed by the 80 and 180 grit belts. After the 40 grit, my sander looked like this:

Wood Gas Flooring Rectangle Machine


And the planes look like this:

Wood Rectangle Gas Flooring Hardwood


I also made bronze lever cap screws that have blackwood epoxied to them and are drying. I used end grain on these because the end grain figuring of this stuff is really cool and wavy. I'll try to get a good closeup after I am done with them. I also made the first of the lever cap retaining screws. Next up will be lever caps, lever cap retaining screws, and final fettling. We're getting close, chaps!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,233 Posts
Making Strides

My wife is out of town for the weekend and I have three little children. However, I took a half day Friday (so I could be around to get kids from school) which gave me some time during the youngest's nap, as well as my normal after bedtime shop time. Plus, I was able to get a few hours Saturday as well. Couple that with lots of thinking about process refinements, and lots of progress has been made.

First, I cut side pieces to width and length. The belt sander gave roughly straight edges afterwards. I also got a couple of blades cut. I need these so that I can set the appropriate spacing between the toe and other sole piece. To cut the blades, I cut a 25 degree angle on a piece of 2×4 and put it in the band saw like so:

Wood Gas Machine tool Machine Tool


This was a little precarious, but it worked, ish. Here you can see that it did not cut square top to bottom, and I knew such would be the case with how it was set up:

Brown Wood Rectangle Flooring Wood stain


A little bit of time with the belt sander gave me this:

Window Wood Rectangle Floor Flooring


I realized afterwards that I could have gotten it even more square using one of my little angle plates to keep it vertical instead of a cutoff piece of scrap, but oh well. I will use a honing guide and small square later anyway. I did use the angle plate on the toe of one of the planes. It turns out that the sides were too short for the hole spacing I had:

Wood Netbook Gadget Flooring Floor


The toes are short, so my band saw needed a little help so that I could cut off about 1/8" from the length:

Wood Bumper Gas Metal Automotive exterior


This allowed me to get the end rivet well inside of the side piece, like so:

Wood Netbook Gadget Flooring Floor


As you can see, I used my drill press table to set this all up. I put the sole pieces on a .003" thick piece of shim stock so that the sides would project downward .003" past the sole to make lapping the sole easier. I used a clamp to keep the bedding infill such that I can put in the blade, position the toe, spring clamp the toe, remove the bedding infill, and superglue the side piece on. I did this for both planes. However, before gluing I used a countersink to very lightly countersink the holes in the sole pieces so that the pieces would make up well. Here you can see just how much I countersunk the holes:

Wood Automotive exterior Hardwood Wood stain Gas


Then, after the glue dried, I used a transfer punch to mark out for holes. Here is where the folly of through rivets on a wider plane come in. Many of the holes were not drilled perfectly straight and plumb due to things like drill bit deflection and the like. This meant that some holes were on an angle, but the transfer punch only marks the center of the hole on the side pieces. So the side pieces got drilled square instead of on the same angle as the hole in the sole. This makes alignment imperfect. So needless to say, if I do another one of these, it will be with peened screws and not through rivets.

Peening

After getting the holes drilled on all the side pieces, it was time to think of peening. First, a test fit:

Wood Rectangle Bumper Automotive exterior Flooring


I needed to use some 320 to clean up the mating surfaces prior to peening. This is to ensure as seamless of a joint as possible. I also reamed all of the holes and actually lightly countersunk each of them as well. A few of the holes did not line up well, so I had to use the dremel to enlarge a couple of holes. Just make sure to take your time peening. It is a painful experience to your forearm, so take frequent breaks. Also, make sure to work the rivet with a few hits in the center, then a few around the edges, and then back to the center. This will smoosh it out nicely. Don't try to power through if your arm is tired, as this will only result in stray hammer hits that need to be sanded out later.

Shaping the toe and heel

After peening, we need to shape the curve on the heel and toe prior to putting in the infill. This makes life easy. Using the glorious 40 grit blue belt on the sander, it took me perhaps half an hour or so to get the curves all shaped.

After not much time, both planes looked like this:

Rectangle Wood Automotive exterior Brick Wood stain


Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Plywood


Inserting Infills

I left the infills a little large on purpose. This lets me work them down to fit nicely. My sides and soles were not 100% square, but most were really close. So I used 100 grit to lap each infill down until it fit well. Good fresh paper made this about a 15 minute job. However, you still want to be careful. I cut some grooves in the wood to give the epoxy someplace to grab. I also put a concavity on the front infill to "help" with chip ejection (I say "help" because I have no idea if it actually works, but it also gives it a more elegant look).

When epoxying in the infills, I used a plane adjusting hammer and scraps to make sure infills were placed correctly. The infills were a good snug fit and a C clamp was used a couple times to get rid of gaps. Make sure you dry fit everything a couple times prior to glue up, as you get only one chance at this. Here is what they look like:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Adhesive


Once the epoxy is set, I used the band saw to cut off the waste near the curves on the heel and toe. I flipped each plane on its infill so that I could cut closely. Then I used the blue belt to sand it flush. That was followed by an 80 and 180 grit belts.

  • Final Shaping*

This is kind of an ongoing stage, but I marked the center line on each plane and started shaping the arc of the top of the plane. I originally thought I would have the arc peak at 3/16" higher than the sides, but this was too much of an arc. So I kept going by eye. I also sanded off (using the 40 grit belt) the rivets. This was followed by the 80 and 180 grit belts. After the 40 grit, my sander looked like this:

Wood Gas Flooring Rectangle Machine


And the planes look like this:

Wood Rectangle Gas Flooring Hardwood


I also made bronze lever cap screws that have blackwood epoxied to them and are drying. I used end grain on these because the end grain figuring of this stuff is really cool and wavy. I'll try to get a good closeup after I am done with them. I also made the first of the lever cap retaining screws. Next up will be lever caps, lever cap retaining screws, and final fettling. We're getting close, chaps!
COOL work…

COOL project…

COOL planes in process!

Thank you!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,844 Posts
Making Strides

My wife is out of town for the weekend and I have three little children. However, I took a half day Friday (so I could be around to get kids from school) which gave me some time during the youngest's nap, as well as my normal after bedtime shop time. Plus, I was able to get a few hours Saturday as well. Couple that with lots of thinking about process refinements, and lots of progress has been made.

First, I cut side pieces to width and length. The belt sander gave roughly straight edges afterwards. I also got a couple of blades cut. I need these so that I can set the appropriate spacing between the toe and other sole piece. To cut the blades, I cut a 25 degree angle on a piece of 2×4 and put it in the band saw like so:

Wood Gas Machine tool Machine Tool


This was a little precarious, but it worked, ish. Here you can see that it did not cut square top to bottom, and I knew such would be the case with how it was set up:

Brown Wood Rectangle Flooring Wood stain


A little bit of time with the belt sander gave me this:

Window Wood Rectangle Floor Flooring


I realized afterwards that I could have gotten it even more square using one of my little angle plates to keep it vertical instead of a cutoff piece of scrap, but oh well. I will use a honing guide and small square later anyway. I did use the angle plate on the toe of one of the planes. It turns out that the sides were too short for the hole spacing I had:

Wood Netbook Gadget Flooring Floor


The toes are short, so my band saw needed a little help so that I could cut off about 1/8" from the length:

Wood Bumper Gas Metal Automotive exterior


This allowed me to get the end rivet well inside of the side piece, like so:

Wood Netbook Gadget Flooring Floor


As you can see, I used my drill press table to set this all up. I put the sole pieces on a .003" thick piece of shim stock so that the sides would project downward .003" past the sole to make lapping the sole easier. I used a clamp to keep the bedding infill such that I can put in the blade, position the toe, spring clamp the toe, remove the bedding infill, and superglue the side piece on. I did this for both planes. However, before gluing I used a countersink to very lightly countersink the holes in the sole pieces so that the pieces would make up well. Here you can see just how much I countersunk the holes:

Wood Automotive exterior Hardwood Wood stain Gas


Then, after the glue dried, I used a transfer punch to mark out for holes. Here is where the folly of through rivets on a wider plane come in. Many of the holes were not drilled perfectly straight and plumb due to things like drill bit deflection and the like. This meant that some holes were on an angle, but the transfer punch only marks the center of the hole on the side pieces. So the side pieces got drilled square instead of on the same angle as the hole in the sole. This makes alignment imperfect. So needless to say, if I do another one of these, it will be with peened screws and not through rivets.

Peening

After getting the holes drilled on all the side pieces, it was time to think of peening. First, a test fit:

Wood Rectangle Bumper Automotive exterior Flooring


I needed to use some 320 to clean up the mating surfaces prior to peening. This is to ensure as seamless of a joint as possible. I also reamed all of the holes and actually lightly countersunk each of them as well. A few of the holes did not line up well, so I had to use the dremel to enlarge a couple of holes. Just make sure to take your time peening. It is a painful experience to your forearm, so take frequent breaks. Also, make sure to work the rivet with a few hits in the center, then a few around the edges, and then back to the center. This will smoosh it out nicely. Don't try to power through if your arm is tired, as this will only result in stray hammer hits that need to be sanded out later.

Shaping the toe and heel

After peening, we need to shape the curve on the heel and toe prior to putting in the infill. This makes life easy. Using the glorious 40 grit blue belt on the sander, it took me perhaps half an hour or so to get the curves all shaped.

After not much time, both planes looked like this:

Rectangle Wood Automotive exterior Brick Wood stain


Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Plywood


Inserting Infills

I left the infills a little large on purpose. This lets me work them down to fit nicely. My sides and soles were not 100% square, but most were really close. So I used 100 grit to lap each infill down until it fit well. Good fresh paper made this about a 15 minute job. However, you still want to be careful. I cut some grooves in the wood to give the epoxy someplace to grab. I also put a concavity on the front infill to "help" with chip ejection (I say "help" because I have no idea if it actually works, but it also gives it a more elegant look).

When epoxying in the infills, I used a plane adjusting hammer and scraps to make sure infills were placed correctly. The infills were a good snug fit and a C clamp was used a couple times to get rid of gaps. Make sure you dry fit everything a couple times prior to glue up, as you get only one chance at this. Here is what they look like:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Adhesive


Once the epoxy is set, I used the band saw to cut off the waste near the curves on the heel and toe. I flipped each plane on its infill so that I could cut closely. Then I used the blue belt to sand it flush. That was followed by an 80 and 180 grit belts.

  • Final Shaping*

This is kind of an ongoing stage, but I marked the center line on each plane and started shaping the arc of the top of the plane. I originally thought I would have the arc peak at 3/16" higher than the sides, but this was too much of an arc. So I kept going by eye. I also sanded off (using the 40 grit belt) the rivets. This was followed by the 80 and 180 grit belts. After the 40 grit, my sander looked like this:

Wood Gas Flooring Rectangle Machine


And the planes look like this:

Wood Rectangle Gas Flooring Hardwood


I also made bronze lever cap screws that have blackwood epoxied to them and are drying. I used end grain on these because the end grain figuring of this stuff is really cool and wavy. I'll try to get a good closeup after I am done with them. I also made the first of the lever cap retaining screws. Next up will be lever caps, lever cap retaining screws, and final fettling. We're getting close, chaps!
Brian Thx for guinea pigging this a bit for the rest of us. Learning a lot here in your infill blogs!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,505 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Making Strides

My wife is out of town for the weekend and I have three little children. However, I took a half day Friday (so I could be around to get kids from school) which gave me some time during the youngest's nap, as well as my normal after bedtime shop time. Plus, I was able to get a few hours Saturday as well. Couple that with lots of thinking about process refinements, and lots of progress has been made.

First, I cut side pieces to width and length. The belt sander gave roughly straight edges afterwards. I also got a couple of blades cut. I need these so that I can set the appropriate spacing between the toe and other sole piece. To cut the blades, I cut a 25 degree angle on a piece of 2×4 and put it in the band saw like so:

Wood Gas Machine tool Machine Tool


This was a little precarious, but it worked, ish. Here you can see that it did not cut square top to bottom, and I knew such would be the case with how it was set up:

Brown Wood Rectangle Flooring Wood stain


A little bit of time with the belt sander gave me this:

Window Wood Rectangle Floor Flooring


I realized afterwards that I could have gotten it even more square using one of my little angle plates to keep it vertical instead of a cutoff piece of scrap, but oh well. I will use a honing guide and small square later anyway. I did use the angle plate on the toe of one of the planes. It turns out that the sides were too short for the hole spacing I had:

Wood Netbook Gadget Flooring Floor


The toes are short, so my band saw needed a little help so that I could cut off about 1/8" from the length:

Wood Bumper Gas Metal Automotive exterior


This allowed me to get the end rivet well inside of the side piece, like so:

Wood Netbook Gadget Flooring Floor


As you can see, I used my drill press table to set this all up. I put the sole pieces on a .003" thick piece of shim stock so that the sides would project downward .003" past the sole to make lapping the sole easier. I used a clamp to keep the bedding infill such that I can put in the blade, position the toe, spring clamp the toe, remove the bedding infill, and superglue the side piece on. I did this for both planes. However, before gluing I used a countersink to very lightly countersink the holes in the sole pieces so that the pieces would make up well. Here you can see just how much I countersunk the holes:

Wood Automotive exterior Hardwood Wood stain Gas


Then, after the glue dried, I used a transfer punch to mark out for holes. Here is where the folly of through rivets on a wider plane come in. Many of the holes were not drilled perfectly straight and plumb due to things like drill bit deflection and the like. This meant that some holes were on an angle, but the transfer punch only marks the center of the hole on the side pieces. So the side pieces got drilled square instead of on the same angle as the hole in the sole. This makes alignment imperfect. So needless to say, if I do another one of these, it will be with peened screws and not through rivets.

Peening

After getting the holes drilled on all the side pieces, it was time to think of peening. First, a test fit:

Wood Rectangle Bumper Automotive exterior Flooring


I needed to use some 320 to clean up the mating surfaces prior to peening. This is to ensure as seamless of a joint as possible. I also reamed all of the holes and actually lightly countersunk each of them as well. A few of the holes did not line up well, so I had to use the dremel to enlarge a couple of holes. Just make sure to take your time peening. It is a painful experience to your forearm, so take frequent breaks. Also, make sure to work the rivet with a few hits in the center, then a few around the edges, and then back to the center. This will smoosh it out nicely. Don't try to power through if your arm is tired, as this will only result in stray hammer hits that need to be sanded out later.

Shaping the toe and heel

After peening, we need to shape the curve on the heel and toe prior to putting in the infill. This makes life easy. Using the glorious 40 grit blue belt on the sander, it took me perhaps half an hour or so to get the curves all shaped.

After not much time, both planes looked like this:

Rectangle Wood Automotive exterior Brick Wood stain


Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Plywood


Inserting Infills

I left the infills a little large on purpose. This lets me work them down to fit nicely. My sides and soles were not 100% square, but most were really close. So I used 100 grit to lap each infill down until it fit well. Good fresh paper made this about a 15 minute job. However, you still want to be careful. I cut some grooves in the wood to give the epoxy someplace to grab. I also put a concavity on the front infill to "help" with chip ejection (I say "help" because I have no idea if it actually works, but it also gives it a more elegant look).

When epoxying in the infills, I used a plane adjusting hammer and scraps to make sure infills were placed correctly. The infills were a good snug fit and a C clamp was used a couple times to get rid of gaps. Make sure you dry fit everything a couple times prior to glue up, as you get only one chance at this. Here is what they look like:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Adhesive


Once the epoxy is set, I used the band saw to cut off the waste near the curves on the heel and toe. I flipped each plane on its infill so that I could cut closely. Then I used the blue belt to sand it flush. That was followed by an 80 and 180 grit belts.

  • Final Shaping*

This is kind of an ongoing stage, but I marked the center line on each plane and started shaping the arc of the top of the plane. I originally thought I would have the arc peak at 3/16" higher than the sides, but this was too much of an arc. So I kept going by eye. I also sanded off (using the 40 grit belt) the rivets. This was followed by the 80 and 180 grit belts. After the 40 grit, my sander looked like this:

Wood Gas Flooring Rectangle Machine


And the planes look like this:

Wood Rectangle Gas Flooring Hardwood


I also made bronze lever cap screws that have blackwood epoxied to them and are drying. I used end grain on these because the end grain figuring of this stuff is really cool and wavy. I'll try to get a good closeup after I am done with them. I also made the first of the lever cap retaining screws. Next up will be lever caps, lever cap retaining screws, and final fettling. We're getting close, chaps!
I am happy to do so. I have plans drawn up for several more. We'll see what else I can manage.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,747 Posts
Making Strides

My wife is out of town for the weekend and I have three little children. However, I took a half day Friday (so I could be around to get kids from school) which gave me some time during the youngest's nap, as well as my normal after bedtime shop time. Plus, I was able to get a few hours Saturday as well. Couple that with lots of thinking about process refinements, and lots of progress has been made.

First, I cut side pieces to width and length. The belt sander gave roughly straight edges afterwards. I also got a couple of blades cut. I need these so that I can set the appropriate spacing between the toe and other sole piece. To cut the blades, I cut a 25 degree angle on a piece of 2×4 and put it in the band saw like so:

Wood Gas Machine tool Machine Tool


This was a little precarious, but it worked, ish. Here you can see that it did not cut square top to bottom, and I knew such would be the case with how it was set up:

Brown Wood Rectangle Flooring Wood stain


A little bit of time with the belt sander gave me this:

Window Wood Rectangle Floor Flooring


I realized afterwards that I could have gotten it even more square using one of my little angle plates to keep it vertical instead of a cutoff piece of scrap, but oh well. I will use a honing guide and small square later anyway. I did use the angle plate on the toe of one of the planes. It turns out that the sides were too short for the hole spacing I had:

Wood Netbook Gadget Flooring Floor


The toes are short, so my band saw needed a little help so that I could cut off about 1/8" from the length:

Wood Bumper Gas Metal Automotive exterior


This allowed me to get the end rivet well inside of the side piece, like so:

Wood Netbook Gadget Flooring Floor


As you can see, I used my drill press table to set this all up. I put the sole pieces on a .003" thick piece of shim stock so that the sides would project downward .003" past the sole to make lapping the sole easier. I used a clamp to keep the bedding infill such that I can put in the blade, position the toe, spring clamp the toe, remove the bedding infill, and superglue the side piece on. I did this for both planes. However, before gluing I used a countersink to very lightly countersink the holes in the sole pieces so that the pieces would make up well. Here you can see just how much I countersunk the holes:

Wood Automotive exterior Hardwood Wood stain Gas


Then, after the glue dried, I used a transfer punch to mark out for holes. Here is where the folly of through rivets on a wider plane come in. Many of the holes were not drilled perfectly straight and plumb due to things like drill bit deflection and the like. This meant that some holes were on an angle, but the transfer punch only marks the center of the hole on the side pieces. So the side pieces got drilled square instead of on the same angle as the hole in the sole. This makes alignment imperfect. So needless to say, if I do another one of these, it will be with peened screws and not through rivets.

Peening

After getting the holes drilled on all the side pieces, it was time to think of peening. First, a test fit:

Wood Rectangle Bumper Automotive exterior Flooring


I needed to use some 320 to clean up the mating surfaces prior to peening. This is to ensure as seamless of a joint as possible. I also reamed all of the holes and actually lightly countersunk each of them as well. A few of the holes did not line up well, so I had to use the dremel to enlarge a couple of holes. Just make sure to take your time peening. It is a painful experience to your forearm, so take frequent breaks. Also, make sure to work the rivet with a few hits in the center, then a few around the edges, and then back to the center. This will smoosh it out nicely. Don't try to power through if your arm is tired, as this will only result in stray hammer hits that need to be sanded out later.

Shaping the toe and heel

After peening, we need to shape the curve on the heel and toe prior to putting in the infill. This makes life easy. Using the glorious 40 grit blue belt on the sander, it took me perhaps half an hour or so to get the curves all shaped.

After not much time, both planes looked like this:

Rectangle Wood Automotive exterior Brick Wood stain


Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Plywood


Inserting Infills

I left the infills a little large on purpose. This lets me work them down to fit nicely. My sides and soles were not 100% square, but most were really close. So I used 100 grit to lap each infill down until it fit well. Good fresh paper made this about a 15 minute job. However, you still want to be careful. I cut some grooves in the wood to give the epoxy someplace to grab. I also put a concavity on the front infill to "help" with chip ejection (I say "help" because I have no idea if it actually works, but it also gives it a more elegant look).

When epoxying in the infills, I used a plane adjusting hammer and scraps to make sure infills were placed correctly. The infills were a good snug fit and a C clamp was used a couple times to get rid of gaps. Make sure you dry fit everything a couple times prior to glue up, as you get only one chance at this. Here is what they look like:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Adhesive


Once the epoxy is set, I used the band saw to cut off the waste near the curves on the heel and toe. I flipped each plane on its infill so that I could cut closely. Then I used the blue belt to sand it flush. That was followed by an 80 and 180 grit belts.

  • Final Shaping*

This is kind of an ongoing stage, but I marked the center line on each plane and started shaping the arc of the top of the plane. I originally thought I would have the arc peak at 3/16" higher than the sides, but this was too much of an arc. So I kept going by eye. I also sanded off (using the 40 grit belt) the rivets. This was followed by the 80 and 180 grit belts. After the 40 grit, my sander looked like this:

Wood Gas Flooring Rectangle Machine


And the planes look like this:

Wood Rectangle Gas Flooring Hardwood


I also made bronze lever cap screws that have blackwood epoxied to them and are drying. I used end grain on these because the end grain figuring of this stuff is really cool and wavy. I'll try to get a good closeup after I am done with them. I also made the first of the lever cap retaining screws. Next up will be lever caps, lever cap retaining screws, and final fettling. We're getting close, chaps!
They look great, Brian!
You are making it look easy…
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,611 Posts
Making Strides

My wife is out of town for the weekend and I have three little children. However, I took a half day Friday (so I could be around to get kids from school) which gave me some time during the youngest's nap, as well as my normal after bedtime shop time. Plus, I was able to get a few hours Saturday as well. Couple that with lots of thinking about process refinements, and lots of progress has been made.

First, I cut side pieces to width and length. The belt sander gave roughly straight edges afterwards. I also got a couple of blades cut. I need these so that I can set the appropriate spacing between the toe and other sole piece. To cut the blades, I cut a 25 degree angle on a piece of 2×4 and put it in the band saw like so:

Wood Gas Machine tool Machine Tool


This was a little precarious, but it worked, ish. Here you can see that it did not cut square top to bottom, and I knew such would be the case with how it was set up:

Brown Wood Rectangle Flooring Wood stain


A little bit of time with the belt sander gave me this:

Window Wood Rectangle Floor Flooring


I realized afterwards that I could have gotten it even more square using one of my little angle plates to keep it vertical instead of a cutoff piece of scrap, but oh well. I will use a honing guide and small square later anyway. I did use the angle plate on the toe of one of the planes. It turns out that the sides were too short for the hole spacing I had:

Wood Netbook Gadget Flooring Floor


The toes are short, so my band saw needed a little help so that I could cut off about 1/8" from the length:

Wood Bumper Gas Metal Automotive exterior


This allowed me to get the end rivet well inside of the side piece, like so:

Wood Netbook Gadget Flooring Floor


As you can see, I used my drill press table to set this all up. I put the sole pieces on a .003" thick piece of shim stock so that the sides would project downward .003" past the sole to make lapping the sole easier. I used a clamp to keep the bedding infill such that I can put in the blade, position the toe, spring clamp the toe, remove the bedding infill, and superglue the side piece on. I did this for both planes. However, before gluing I used a countersink to very lightly countersink the holes in the sole pieces so that the pieces would make up well. Here you can see just how much I countersunk the holes:

Wood Automotive exterior Hardwood Wood stain Gas


Then, after the glue dried, I used a transfer punch to mark out for holes. Here is where the folly of through rivets on a wider plane come in. Many of the holes were not drilled perfectly straight and plumb due to things like drill bit deflection and the like. This meant that some holes were on an angle, but the transfer punch only marks the center of the hole on the side pieces. So the side pieces got drilled square instead of on the same angle as the hole in the sole. This makes alignment imperfect. So needless to say, if I do another one of these, it will be with peened screws and not through rivets.

Peening

After getting the holes drilled on all the side pieces, it was time to think of peening. First, a test fit:

Wood Rectangle Bumper Automotive exterior Flooring


I needed to use some 320 to clean up the mating surfaces prior to peening. This is to ensure as seamless of a joint as possible. I also reamed all of the holes and actually lightly countersunk each of them as well. A few of the holes did not line up well, so I had to use the dremel to enlarge a couple of holes. Just make sure to take your time peening. It is a painful experience to your forearm, so take frequent breaks. Also, make sure to work the rivet with a few hits in the center, then a few around the edges, and then back to the center. This will smoosh it out nicely. Don't try to power through if your arm is tired, as this will only result in stray hammer hits that need to be sanded out later.

Shaping the toe and heel

After peening, we need to shape the curve on the heel and toe prior to putting in the infill. This makes life easy. Using the glorious 40 grit blue belt on the sander, it took me perhaps half an hour or so to get the curves all shaped.

After not much time, both planes looked like this:

Rectangle Wood Automotive exterior Brick Wood stain


Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Plywood


Inserting Infills

I left the infills a little large on purpose. This lets me work them down to fit nicely. My sides and soles were not 100% square, but most were really close. So I used 100 grit to lap each infill down until it fit well. Good fresh paper made this about a 15 minute job. However, you still want to be careful. I cut some grooves in the wood to give the epoxy someplace to grab. I also put a concavity on the front infill to "help" with chip ejection (I say "help" because I have no idea if it actually works, but it also gives it a more elegant look).

When epoxying in the infills, I used a plane adjusting hammer and scraps to make sure infills were placed correctly. The infills were a good snug fit and a C clamp was used a couple times to get rid of gaps. Make sure you dry fit everything a couple times prior to glue up, as you get only one chance at this. Here is what they look like:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Adhesive


Once the epoxy is set, I used the band saw to cut off the waste near the curves on the heel and toe. I flipped each plane on its infill so that I could cut closely. Then I used the blue belt to sand it flush. That was followed by an 80 and 180 grit belts.

  • Final Shaping*

This is kind of an ongoing stage, but I marked the center line on each plane and started shaping the arc of the top of the plane. I originally thought I would have the arc peak at 3/16" higher than the sides, but this was too much of an arc. So I kept going by eye. I also sanded off (using the 40 grit belt) the rivets. This was followed by the 80 and 180 grit belts. After the 40 grit, my sander looked like this:

Wood Gas Flooring Rectangle Machine


And the planes look like this:

Wood Rectangle Gas Flooring Hardwood


I also made bronze lever cap screws that have blackwood epoxied to them and are drying. I used end grain on these because the end grain figuring of this stuff is really cool and wavy. I'll try to get a good closeup after I am done with them. I also made the first of the lever cap retaining screws. Next up will be lever caps, lever cap retaining screws, and final fettling. We're getting close, chaps!
Well done
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Making Strides

My wife is out of town for the weekend and I have three little children. However, I took a half day Friday (so I could be around to get kids from school) which gave me some time during the youngest's nap, as well as my normal after bedtime shop time. Plus, I was able to get a few hours Saturday as well. Couple that with lots of thinking about process refinements, and lots of progress has been made.

First, I cut side pieces to width and length. The belt sander gave roughly straight edges afterwards. I also got a couple of blades cut. I need these so that I can set the appropriate spacing between the toe and other sole piece. To cut the blades, I cut a 25 degree angle on a piece of 2×4 and put it in the band saw like so:

Wood Gas Machine tool Machine Tool


This was a little precarious, but it worked, ish. Here you can see that it did not cut square top to bottom, and I knew such would be the case with how it was set up:

Brown Wood Rectangle Flooring Wood stain


A little bit of time with the belt sander gave me this:

Window Wood Rectangle Floor Flooring


I realized afterwards that I could have gotten it even more square using one of my little angle plates to keep it vertical instead of a cutoff piece of scrap, but oh well. I will use a honing guide and small square later anyway. I did use the angle plate on the toe of one of the planes. It turns out that the sides were too short for the hole spacing I had:

Wood Netbook Gadget Flooring Floor


The toes are short, so my band saw needed a little help so that I could cut off about 1/8" from the length:

Wood Bumper Gas Metal Automotive exterior


This allowed me to get the end rivet well inside of the side piece, like so:

Wood Netbook Gadget Flooring Floor


As you can see, I used my drill press table to set this all up. I put the sole pieces on a .003" thick piece of shim stock so that the sides would project downward .003" past the sole to make lapping the sole easier. I used a clamp to keep the bedding infill such that I can put in the blade, position the toe, spring clamp the toe, remove the bedding infill, and superglue the side piece on. I did this for both planes. However, before gluing I used a countersink to very lightly countersink the holes in the sole pieces so that the pieces would make up well. Here you can see just how much I countersunk the holes:

Wood Automotive exterior Hardwood Wood stain Gas


Then, after the glue dried, I used a transfer punch to mark out for holes. Here is where the folly of through rivets on a wider plane come in. Many of the holes were not drilled perfectly straight and plumb due to things like drill bit deflection and the like. This meant that some holes were on an angle, but the transfer punch only marks the center of the hole on the side pieces. So the side pieces got drilled square instead of on the same angle as the hole in the sole. This makes alignment imperfect. So needless to say, if I do another one of these, it will be with peened screws and not through rivets.

Peening

After getting the holes drilled on all the side pieces, it was time to think of peening. First, a test fit:

Wood Rectangle Bumper Automotive exterior Flooring


I needed to use some 320 to clean up the mating surfaces prior to peening. This is to ensure as seamless of a joint as possible. I also reamed all of the holes and actually lightly countersunk each of them as well. A few of the holes did not line up well, so I had to use the dremel to enlarge a couple of holes. Just make sure to take your time peening. It is a painful experience to your forearm, so take frequent breaks. Also, make sure to work the rivet with a few hits in the center, then a few around the edges, and then back to the center. This will smoosh it out nicely. Don't try to power through if your arm is tired, as this will only result in stray hammer hits that need to be sanded out later.

Shaping the toe and heel

After peening, we need to shape the curve on the heel and toe prior to putting in the infill. This makes life easy. Using the glorious 40 grit blue belt on the sander, it took me perhaps half an hour or so to get the curves all shaped.

After not much time, both planes looked like this:

Rectangle Wood Automotive exterior Brick Wood stain


Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Plywood


Inserting Infills

I left the infills a little large on purpose. This lets me work them down to fit nicely. My sides and soles were not 100% square, but most were really close. So I used 100 grit to lap each infill down until it fit well. Good fresh paper made this about a 15 minute job. However, you still want to be careful. I cut some grooves in the wood to give the epoxy someplace to grab. I also put a concavity on the front infill to "help" with chip ejection (I say "help" because I have no idea if it actually works, but it also gives it a more elegant look).

When epoxying in the infills, I used a plane adjusting hammer and scraps to make sure infills were placed correctly. The infills were a good snug fit and a C clamp was used a couple times to get rid of gaps. Make sure you dry fit everything a couple times prior to glue up, as you get only one chance at this. Here is what they look like:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Adhesive


Once the epoxy is set, I used the band saw to cut off the waste near the curves on the heel and toe. I flipped each plane on its infill so that I could cut closely. Then I used the blue belt to sand it flush. That was followed by an 80 and 180 grit belts.

  • Final Shaping*

This is kind of an ongoing stage, but I marked the center line on each plane and started shaping the arc of the top of the plane. I originally thought I would have the arc peak at 3/16" higher than the sides, but this was too much of an arc. So I kept going by eye. I also sanded off (using the 40 grit belt) the rivets. This was followed by the 80 and 180 grit belts. After the 40 grit, my sander looked like this:

Wood Gas Flooring Rectangle Machine


And the planes look like this:

Wood Rectangle Gas Flooring Hardwood


I also made bronze lever cap screws that have blackwood epoxied to them and are drying. I used end grain on these because the end grain figuring of this stuff is really cool and wavy. I'll try to get a good closeup after I am done with them. I also made the first of the lever cap retaining screws. Next up will be lever caps, lever cap retaining screws, and final fettling. We're getting close, chaps!
Brian, if you were starting over now, would you (1) use plain rod in a shallower blind (i.e., non-through) hole or (2) peen some screws?

Do you think a shallower hole would have eliminated your alignment problem? Solid rod appeals to me because I don't have a tap and die.

I remember you recommending flat-head to avoid the deeper pattern of the Philips head… what else would you look for the fastener? How about a solid countersunk rivet?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,887 Posts
Making Strides

My wife is out of town for the weekend and I have three little children. However, I took a half day Friday (so I could be around to get kids from school) which gave me some time during the youngest's nap, as well as my normal after bedtime shop time. Plus, I was able to get a few hours Saturday as well. Couple that with lots of thinking about process refinements, and lots of progress has been made.

First, I cut side pieces to width and length. The belt sander gave roughly straight edges afterwards. I also got a couple of blades cut. I need these so that I can set the appropriate spacing between the toe and other sole piece. To cut the blades, I cut a 25 degree angle on a piece of 2×4 and put it in the band saw like so:

Wood Gas Machine tool Machine Tool


This was a little precarious, but it worked, ish. Here you can see that it did not cut square top to bottom, and I knew such would be the case with how it was set up:

Brown Wood Rectangle Flooring Wood stain


A little bit of time with the belt sander gave me this:

Window Wood Rectangle Floor Flooring


I realized afterwards that I could have gotten it even more square using one of my little angle plates to keep it vertical instead of a cutoff piece of scrap, but oh well. I will use a honing guide and small square later anyway. I did use the angle plate on the toe of one of the planes. It turns out that the sides were too short for the hole spacing I had:

Wood Netbook Gadget Flooring Floor


The toes are short, so my band saw needed a little help so that I could cut off about 1/8" from the length:

Wood Bumper Gas Metal Automotive exterior


This allowed me to get the end rivet well inside of the side piece, like so:

Wood Netbook Gadget Flooring Floor


As you can see, I used my drill press table to set this all up. I put the sole pieces on a .003" thick piece of shim stock so that the sides would project downward .003" past the sole to make lapping the sole easier. I used a clamp to keep the bedding infill such that I can put in the blade, position the toe, spring clamp the toe, remove the bedding infill, and superglue the side piece on. I did this for both planes. However, before gluing I used a countersink to very lightly countersink the holes in the sole pieces so that the pieces would make up well. Here you can see just how much I countersunk the holes:

Wood Automotive exterior Hardwood Wood stain Gas


Then, after the glue dried, I used a transfer punch to mark out for holes. Here is where the folly of through rivets on a wider plane come in. Many of the holes were not drilled perfectly straight and plumb due to things like drill bit deflection and the like. This meant that some holes were on an angle, but the transfer punch only marks the center of the hole on the side pieces. So the side pieces got drilled square instead of on the same angle as the hole in the sole. This makes alignment imperfect. So needless to say, if I do another one of these, it will be with peened screws and not through rivets.

Peening

After getting the holes drilled on all the side pieces, it was time to think of peening. First, a test fit:

Wood Rectangle Bumper Automotive exterior Flooring


I needed to use some 320 to clean up the mating surfaces prior to peening. This is to ensure as seamless of a joint as possible. I also reamed all of the holes and actually lightly countersunk each of them as well. A few of the holes did not line up well, so I had to use the dremel to enlarge a couple of holes. Just make sure to take your time peening. It is a painful experience to your forearm, so take frequent breaks. Also, make sure to work the rivet with a few hits in the center, then a few around the edges, and then back to the center. This will smoosh it out nicely. Don't try to power through if your arm is tired, as this will only result in stray hammer hits that need to be sanded out later.

Shaping the toe and heel

After peening, we need to shape the curve on the heel and toe prior to putting in the infill. This makes life easy. Using the glorious 40 grit blue belt on the sander, it took me perhaps half an hour or so to get the curves all shaped.

After not much time, both planes looked like this:

Rectangle Wood Automotive exterior Brick Wood stain


Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Plywood


Inserting Infills

I left the infills a little large on purpose. This lets me work them down to fit nicely. My sides and soles were not 100% square, but most were really close. So I used 100 grit to lap each infill down until it fit well. Good fresh paper made this about a 15 minute job. However, you still want to be careful. I cut some grooves in the wood to give the epoxy someplace to grab. I also put a concavity on the front infill to "help" with chip ejection (I say "help" because I have no idea if it actually works, but it also gives it a more elegant look).

When epoxying in the infills, I used a plane adjusting hammer and scraps to make sure infills were placed correctly. The infills were a good snug fit and a C clamp was used a couple times to get rid of gaps. Make sure you dry fit everything a couple times prior to glue up, as you get only one chance at this. Here is what they look like:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Adhesive


Once the epoxy is set, I used the band saw to cut off the waste near the curves on the heel and toe. I flipped each plane on its infill so that I could cut closely. Then I used the blue belt to sand it flush. That was followed by an 80 and 180 grit belts.

  • Final Shaping*

This is kind of an ongoing stage, but I marked the center line on each plane and started shaping the arc of the top of the plane. I originally thought I would have the arc peak at 3/16" higher than the sides, but this was too much of an arc. So I kept going by eye. I also sanded off (using the 40 grit belt) the rivets. This was followed by the 80 and 180 grit belts. After the 40 grit, my sander looked like this:

Wood Gas Flooring Rectangle Machine


And the planes look like this:

Wood Rectangle Gas Flooring Hardwood


I also made bronze lever cap screws that have blackwood epoxied to them and are drying. I used end grain on these because the end grain figuring of this stuff is really cool and wavy. I'll try to get a good closeup after I am done with them. I also made the first of the lever cap retaining screws. Next up will be lever caps, lever cap retaining screws, and final fettling. We're getting close, chaps!
Pretty sweet
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,505 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Making Strides

My wife is out of town for the weekend and I have three little children. However, I took a half day Friday (so I could be around to get kids from school) which gave me some time during the youngest's nap, as well as my normal after bedtime shop time. Plus, I was able to get a few hours Saturday as well. Couple that with lots of thinking about process refinements, and lots of progress has been made.

First, I cut side pieces to width and length. The belt sander gave roughly straight edges afterwards. I also got a couple of blades cut. I need these so that I can set the appropriate spacing between the toe and other sole piece. To cut the blades, I cut a 25 degree angle on a piece of 2×4 and put it in the band saw like so:

Wood Gas Machine tool Machine Tool


This was a little precarious, but it worked, ish. Here you can see that it did not cut square top to bottom, and I knew such would be the case with how it was set up:

Brown Wood Rectangle Flooring Wood stain


A little bit of time with the belt sander gave me this:

Window Wood Rectangle Floor Flooring


I realized afterwards that I could have gotten it even more square using one of my little angle plates to keep it vertical instead of a cutoff piece of scrap, but oh well. I will use a honing guide and small square later anyway. I did use the angle plate on the toe of one of the planes. It turns out that the sides were too short for the hole spacing I had:

Wood Netbook Gadget Flooring Floor


The toes are short, so my band saw needed a little help so that I could cut off about 1/8" from the length:

Wood Bumper Gas Metal Automotive exterior


This allowed me to get the end rivet well inside of the side piece, like so:

Wood Netbook Gadget Flooring Floor


As you can see, I used my drill press table to set this all up. I put the sole pieces on a .003" thick piece of shim stock so that the sides would project downward .003" past the sole to make lapping the sole easier. I used a clamp to keep the bedding infill such that I can put in the blade, position the toe, spring clamp the toe, remove the bedding infill, and superglue the side piece on. I did this for both planes. However, before gluing I used a countersink to very lightly countersink the holes in the sole pieces so that the pieces would make up well. Here you can see just how much I countersunk the holes:

Wood Automotive exterior Hardwood Wood stain Gas


Then, after the glue dried, I used a transfer punch to mark out for holes. Here is where the folly of through rivets on a wider plane come in. Many of the holes were not drilled perfectly straight and plumb due to things like drill bit deflection and the like. This meant that some holes were on an angle, but the transfer punch only marks the center of the hole on the side pieces. So the side pieces got drilled square instead of on the same angle as the hole in the sole. This makes alignment imperfect. So needless to say, if I do another one of these, it will be with peened screws and not through rivets.

Peening

After getting the holes drilled on all the side pieces, it was time to think of peening. First, a test fit:

Wood Rectangle Bumper Automotive exterior Flooring


I needed to use some 320 to clean up the mating surfaces prior to peening. This is to ensure as seamless of a joint as possible. I also reamed all of the holes and actually lightly countersunk each of them as well. A few of the holes did not line up well, so I had to use the dremel to enlarge a couple of holes. Just make sure to take your time peening. It is a painful experience to your forearm, so take frequent breaks. Also, make sure to work the rivet with a few hits in the center, then a few around the edges, and then back to the center. This will smoosh it out nicely. Don't try to power through if your arm is tired, as this will only result in stray hammer hits that need to be sanded out later.

Shaping the toe and heel

After peening, we need to shape the curve on the heel and toe prior to putting in the infill. This makes life easy. Using the glorious 40 grit blue belt on the sander, it took me perhaps half an hour or so to get the curves all shaped.

After not much time, both planes looked like this:

Rectangle Wood Automotive exterior Brick Wood stain


Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Plywood


Inserting Infills

I left the infills a little large on purpose. This lets me work them down to fit nicely. My sides and soles were not 100% square, but most were really close. So I used 100 grit to lap each infill down until it fit well. Good fresh paper made this about a 15 minute job. However, you still want to be careful. I cut some grooves in the wood to give the epoxy someplace to grab. I also put a concavity on the front infill to "help" with chip ejection (I say "help" because I have no idea if it actually works, but it also gives it a more elegant look).

When epoxying in the infills, I used a plane adjusting hammer and scraps to make sure infills were placed correctly. The infills were a good snug fit and a C clamp was used a couple times to get rid of gaps. Make sure you dry fit everything a couple times prior to glue up, as you get only one chance at this. Here is what they look like:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Adhesive


Once the epoxy is set, I used the band saw to cut off the waste near the curves on the heel and toe. I flipped each plane on its infill so that I could cut closely. Then I used the blue belt to sand it flush. That was followed by an 80 and 180 grit belts.

  • Final Shaping*

This is kind of an ongoing stage, but I marked the center line on each plane and started shaping the arc of the top of the plane. I originally thought I would have the arc peak at 3/16" higher than the sides, but this was too much of an arc. So I kept going by eye. I also sanded off (using the 40 grit belt) the rivets. This was followed by the 80 and 180 grit belts. After the 40 grit, my sander looked like this:

Wood Gas Flooring Rectangle Machine


And the planes look like this:

Wood Rectangle Gas Flooring Hardwood


I also made bronze lever cap screws that have blackwood epoxied to them and are drying. I used end grain on these because the end grain figuring of this stuff is really cool and wavy. I'll try to get a good closeup after I am done with them. I also made the first of the lever cap retaining screws. Next up will be lever caps, lever cap retaining screws, and final fettling. We're getting close, chaps!
Lucas, you can't use a plain rod in a bind hole, because the end in the hole would have nothing to to grab to and would just slide right out. If I were to do this again, I would use screws. With a good countersink (I love my zero flute countersink), there is really close to no peening needed. Just enough to make sure that any voids due to chatter get filled.

All that being said, my alignment is not horribly off, but it will require some lapping, which I am not overly excited about. Also, alignment issues can be somewhat correct by either drilling holes out larger, reaming them some, or using a dremel to increase the size slightly. Giving more wiggle room allows for better alignment, but can make peening tough just because you then have to worry about using clamps or something to hold the alignment while peening, which is not a simple task, but it can be done.

If I were doing this all over, I would do screws, but if someone confiscated my tap, I would do the through rivets and not lose any sleep, but what I would change is this:

- Use a screw machine drill to start. This will help establish a straight hole.
- Don't be afraid to slightly enlarge holes if alignment is off

That being said, a tap is only nominally more expensive than a screw machine drill bit. Though into a blind hole, having both a plug and bottoming tap is a very good idea. Just make sure you tap the hole straight.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,958 Posts
Making Strides

My wife is out of town for the weekend and I have three little children. However, I took a half day Friday (so I could be around to get kids from school) which gave me some time during the youngest's nap, as well as my normal after bedtime shop time. Plus, I was able to get a few hours Saturday as well. Couple that with lots of thinking about process refinements, and lots of progress has been made.

First, I cut side pieces to width and length. The belt sander gave roughly straight edges afterwards. I also got a couple of blades cut. I need these so that I can set the appropriate spacing between the toe and other sole piece. To cut the blades, I cut a 25 degree angle on a piece of 2×4 and put it in the band saw like so:

Wood Gas Machine tool Machine Tool


This was a little precarious, but it worked, ish. Here you can see that it did not cut square top to bottom, and I knew such would be the case with how it was set up:

Brown Wood Rectangle Flooring Wood stain


A little bit of time with the belt sander gave me this:

Window Wood Rectangle Floor Flooring


I realized afterwards that I could have gotten it even more square using one of my little angle plates to keep it vertical instead of a cutoff piece of scrap, but oh well. I will use a honing guide and small square later anyway. I did use the angle plate on the toe of one of the planes. It turns out that the sides were too short for the hole spacing I had:

Wood Netbook Gadget Flooring Floor


The toes are short, so my band saw needed a little help so that I could cut off about 1/8" from the length:

Wood Bumper Gas Metal Automotive exterior


This allowed me to get the end rivet well inside of the side piece, like so:

Wood Netbook Gadget Flooring Floor


As you can see, I used my drill press table to set this all up. I put the sole pieces on a .003" thick piece of shim stock so that the sides would project downward .003" past the sole to make lapping the sole easier. I used a clamp to keep the bedding infill such that I can put in the blade, position the toe, spring clamp the toe, remove the bedding infill, and superglue the side piece on. I did this for both planes. However, before gluing I used a countersink to very lightly countersink the holes in the sole pieces so that the pieces would make up well. Here you can see just how much I countersunk the holes:

Wood Automotive exterior Hardwood Wood stain Gas


Then, after the glue dried, I used a transfer punch to mark out for holes. Here is where the folly of through rivets on a wider plane come in. Many of the holes were not drilled perfectly straight and plumb due to things like drill bit deflection and the like. This meant that some holes were on an angle, but the transfer punch only marks the center of the hole on the side pieces. So the side pieces got drilled square instead of on the same angle as the hole in the sole. This makes alignment imperfect. So needless to say, if I do another one of these, it will be with peened screws and not through rivets.

Peening

After getting the holes drilled on all the side pieces, it was time to think of peening. First, a test fit:

Wood Rectangle Bumper Automotive exterior Flooring


I needed to use some 320 to clean up the mating surfaces prior to peening. This is to ensure as seamless of a joint as possible. I also reamed all of the holes and actually lightly countersunk each of them as well. A few of the holes did not line up well, so I had to use the dremel to enlarge a couple of holes. Just make sure to take your time peening. It is a painful experience to your forearm, so take frequent breaks. Also, make sure to work the rivet with a few hits in the center, then a few around the edges, and then back to the center. This will smoosh it out nicely. Don't try to power through if your arm is tired, as this will only result in stray hammer hits that need to be sanded out later.

Shaping the toe and heel

After peening, we need to shape the curve on the heel and toe prior to putting in the infill. This makes life easy. Using the glorious 40 grit blue belt on the sander, it took me perhaps half an hour or so to get the curves all shaped.

After not much time, both planes looked like this:

Rectangle Wood Automotive exterior Brick Wood stain


Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Plywood


Inserting Infills

I left the infills a little large on purpose. This lets me work them down to fit nicely. My sides and soles were not 100% square, but most were really close. So I used 100 grit to lap each infill down until it fit well. Good fresh paper made this about a 15 minute job. However, you still want to be careful. I cut some grooves in the wood to give the epoxy someplace to grab. I also put a concavity on the front infill to "help" with chip ejection (I say "help" because I have no idea if it actually works, but it also gives it a more elegant look).

When epoxying in the infills, I used a plane adjusting hammer and scraps to make sure infills were placed correctly. The infills were a good snug fit and a C clamp was used a couple times to get rid of gaps. Make sure you dry fit everything a couple times prior to glue up, as you get only one chance at this. Here is what they look like:

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Adhesive


Once the epoxy is set, I used the band saw to cut off the waste near the curves on the heel and toe. I flipped each plane on its infill so that I could cut closely. Then I used the blue belt to sand it flush. That was followed by an 80 and 180 grit belts.

  • Final Shaping*

This is kind of an ongoing stage, but I marked the center line on each plane and started shaping the arc of the top of the plane. I originally thought I would have the arc peak at 3/16" higher than the sides, but this was too much of an arc. So I kept going by eye. I also sanded off (using the 40 grit belt) the rivets. This was followed by the 80 and 180 grit belts. After the 40 grit, my sander looked like this:

Wood Gas Flooring Rectangle Machine


And the planes look like this:

Wood Rectangle Gas Flooring Hardwood


I also made bronze lever cap screws that have blackwood epoxied to them and are drying. I used end grain on these because the end grain figuring of this stuff is really cool and wavy. I'll try to get a good closeup after I am done with them. I also made the first of the lever cap retaining screws. Next up will be lever caps, lever cap retaining screws, and final fettling. We're getting close, chaps!
Really nice to see this metal and wood combination work.
Best thoughts,
Mads
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,505 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
That's a Wrap!

Time to update this blog. There was not a whole lot of movement for a while because after getting the planes all put together, I set to lapping the soles flat. Well, the issue there is that because peening through rivets is less precise, the sole pieces were somewhat misaligned, much more than I could lap out. I tried using my little mill to fly cut the soles, but I only made it worse (I have come to find out that to cut steel in my little machine, I must use sharp HSS and not carbide, it isn't rigid enough for that).

So to remedy that, I took them down to the local machine shop. For $30, they milled the soles nice and flat. The only thing is that they had to sneak them in between jobs, which took 4 weeks. And when I got them back, they were covered in surface rust, including inside the plane where the lever caps go. But I'm getting ahead of myself…

Lever Cap Screws

The lever caps are retained by custom made brass screws. These are made from 3/16" brass rod, that is threaded #6-32 on one end and left at 3/16" on the other. I made these on my little metal lathe. My first batch, however, I cut the slots by hand using my dremel. This resulted in slots of inconsistent depth and some off center. For planes like this, that simply wasn't going to do. So I pondered the situation, and came up with this:

Machine tool Gas Wood Machine Composite material


All this is is a piece of scrap aluminum, drilled and tapped at #6-32 and held in a little vise. The dremel cutoff disk is held in the mill in a collet. To ensure that the screw doesn't move, I used a jam nut on the back, like so:

Wood Bicycle Gas Machine Kitchen appliance


Then, I set the height of the disk to be on center (which was marked using a center finder and scribe). I cut the full depth in one go (I think it was like 3/32 depth), and we get a perfect looking slot, like this:

Fluid Rectangle Wood Gas Composite material


Lever Cap Goodness

While waiting on the machine shop, I also started working on lever caps. My prototype used 3/8" steel for the lever cap, which looks totally overkill, so on these I used 1/4", which looks much better. I decided not to just wing it with the shape, and drew a design out in cad. I printed it out and marked the lever cap blanks, including the hold for the thumb screw. I roughed it out on my metal bandsaw, then worked the profile using both the belts and spindle of my ROSS.

One of the hardest things with lever caps is getting a nice rounded top. This is because it can be tough to hole the piece tightly through a 90 degree arc to get the rounded profile. On the prototype, I used a screw through the thumb screw hole with a jam nut. This worked ok, but it was very difficult to get the profile to be square to the side of the lever cap, which is not aesthetically pleasing.

To make sure that the rounded profile was square, I pulled out one of my angle plates. These are so handy, and are rather cheap. This one was 8 or 9 bucks from Enco and is way more square than woodworking ever requires. I just used a bolt through the plate and into the thumb screw hole. I used a machinist square to make sure it was all squared, and it was off to the belt sander:

Wood Bumper Automotive exterior Gas Rectangle


Wood Rectangle Gas Electric blue Auto part


Wood Household hardware Hardwood Auto part Wood stain


Thumb Screws

I apologize up front for no images of this process, but I have described it a number of times, however here is a recap:

- Take a piece of round stock roughly the diameter you want (slightly oversized)
- Drill and tap through the center
- Cut off the desired thickness (plus enough to get rid of any cutting marks on both sides)
- Clean up both sides. Make sure the bottom side gets sanded to about 1000 grit
- Epoxy in a length of threaded rod so that it sits just less than flush
- Epoxy on a piece of wood about 3/16" thick. This can be square at this point
- Turn down the thumb screw (with the threads in a pair of nuts that have a slit cut in them, so you don't mess up the threads) so that the wood and metal are flush
- Use a file and sandpaper and sand the whole thing up to 1000 grit
- Finish wood with some oil and wax the whole thing

In my case, I used some bronze I have on hand, which turns about like steel. It is much(!) tougher than brass. I decided to use end grain wood on these because this Burmese Blackwood has a really cool ripple in the end grain that is hard to get in a picture. I still need to cut the threaded rod down more.

Putting it All Together

So I started off by cleaning of all the surface rust. This was a huge pain, literally and figuratively. Use good quality sandpaper and change out paper often to make it easier. Getting in the mouth area was so annoying. If you are going to do as I did and have someone mill the soles, coat all metal surfaces in wax before taking it to them.

I filed chamfers along the front and back, but not on the sides. I felt the rounded profile of the top was enough. I then sanded up to 320 grit, and then used maroon and gray Scotch-Brite pads. This left a beautiful satin finish.

I wanted to prevent rust and had read of some people using Danish oil and wax, even on the steel. So I gave it a try, and it was disastrous. It was sticky and nasty and left a strange appearance to the steel. So I had to get rid of all of it using gray Scotch-Brite again. Then I waxed everything thoroughly. Just wax has to be reapplied every now and again, but it is cheap and easy to do and very effective. I coated the lever caps after finishing them 4 or 5 weeks ago and not a trace of corrosion despite sitting on my bench top that whole time.

Now, before the final photos, I have a confession to make. Somehow I managed to make one of the planes a 55 degree bed and the other a 46 degree. I have no idea how that happened, to be honest. It could be that it was put in the milling machine at the machine shop on an angle, but I haven't cared enough to figure it out. It should still work just fine, but it was a bummer. I looked at it and said "That does not look nearly steep enough" and lo and behold, it wasn't. Oh well, it has a mouth of only a few thousandths, so it should work well anyway, and I can back bevel the blade if need be.

Without further ado, here we are:

Wood Art Rectangle Packing materials Sculpture


Brown Wood Toy Flooring Art


And with the prototype:

Brown Food Table Wood Toy


Wood Hardwood Art Metal Rock


I lost track of how much time, but rest assured it wasn't all that bad.

Now, before we leave, here are some

LESSONS LEARNED

- 7/32" thick steel takes a while to cut
- Peened through rivets on something this wide is not a good idea. Drill bit flex comes in to play and alignment can be an issue.
- Measure your bedding angles very carefully
- Bronze is not equivalent to brass
- A strong belt sander would make life even easier
- Not all precision ground steel is equal. I have yet to find any as good as what Enco carries, but I have not tried several places still

Thanks for following along, our journey ends here
 

Attachments

1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top