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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The First Cuts

I made my first cuts with my new table saw today. I had no particular need to cut any wood. I just really couldn't wait. I grabbed an old piece of scrap 3/4" pine that I had laying around from a little project I did a couple of years ago. I put on my eye and ear protection, grabbed my push stick, and plugged in the saw. (As always, safety first.) I started it up and pushed the board through. I only have a 1.5 HP saw, but it cut through the pine like a warm knife through butter. (Maybe this is due to using a good blade instead of the one that came with the saw.) I compared my cut (a rip cut) to the one on the opposite side of the board, a cut made at the original saw mill. My saw produced a far superior cut (of course, the board was originally cut by the mill over two years ago). I went ahead and did a couple of crosscuts followed by a rip along the other edge. I grabbed a framing square and checked my results. It was perfect!

As lame as it may sound, I've decided to frame this board and hang it on the wall of the garage. I wrote "The First Cuts" and the current date on it. (Since I don't plan to sell anything I make, I'll never have a "first dollar" to hang on the wall.)

It was a very satisfying feeling to make those first cuts. I can't wait to get to the local hardwoods dealer and buy some nice stuff to start working with. Now I just need to buy a truck so I don't have to borrow my neighbor's. With our first baby on the way, I know my wife isn't approving a truck purchase, so I'm not even trying.
 

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The First Cuts

I made my first cuts with my new table saw today. I had no particular need to cut any wood. I just really couldn't wait. I grabbed an old piece of scrap 3/4" pine that I had laying around from a little project I did a couple of years ago. I put on my eye and ear protection, grabbed my push stick, and plugged in the saw. (As always, safety first.) I started it up and pushed the board through. I only have a 1.5 HP saw, but it cut through the pine like a warm knife through butter. (Maybe this is due to using a good blade instead of the one that came with the saw.) I compared my cut (a rip cut) to the one on the opposite side of the board, a cut made at the original saw mill. My saw produced a far superior cut (of course, the board was originally cut by the mill over two years ago). I went ahead and did a couple of crosscuts followed by a rip along the other edge. I grabbed a framing square and checked my results. It was perfect!

As lame as it may sound, I've decided to frame this board and hang it on the wall of the garage. I wrote "The First Cuts" and the current date on it. (Since I don't plan to sell anything I make, I'll never have a "first dollar" to hang on the wall.)

It was a very satisfying feeling to make those first cuts. I can't wait to get to the local hardwoods dealer and buy some nice stuff to start working with. Now I just need to buy a truck so I don't have to borrow my neighbor's. With our first baby on the way, I know my wife isn't approving a truck purchase, so I'm not even trying.
Can you hide the truck out behind the workshop. If she's expecting a baby she won't be rooting around for a while. By that time you should be able to come up with a good story.
 

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The First Cuts

I made my first cuts with my new table saw today. I had no particular need to cut any wood. I just really couldn't wait. I grabbed an old piece of scrap 3/4" pine that I had laying around from a little project I did a couple of years ago. I put on my eye and ear protection, grabbed my push stick, and plugged in the saw. (As always, safety first.) I started it up and pushed the board through. I only have a 1.5 HP saw, but it cut through the pine like a warm knife through butter. (Maybe this is due to using a good blade instead of the one that came with the saw.) I compared my cut (a rip cut) to the one on the opposite side of the board, a cut made at the original saw mill. My saw produced a far superior cut (of course, the board was originally cut by the mill over two years ago). I went ahead and did a couple of crosscuts followed by a rip along the other edge. I grabbed a framing square and checked my results. It was perfect!

As lame as it may sound, I've decided to frame this board and hang it on the wall of the garage. I wrote "The First Cuts" and the current date on it. (Since I don't plan to sell anything I make, I'll never have a "first dollar" to hang on the wall.)

It was a very satisfying feeling to make those first cuts. I can't wait to get to the local hardwoods dealer and buy some nice stuff to start working with. Now I just need to buy a truck so I don't have to borrow my neighbor's. With our first baby on the way, I know my wife isn't approving a truck purchase, so I'm not even trying.
"But honey, it followed me home!"
 

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The First Cuts

I made my first cuts with my new table saw today. I had no particular need to cut any wood. I just really couldn't wait. I grabbed an old piece of scrap 3/4" pine that I had laying around from a little project I did a couple of years ago. I put on my eye and ear protection, grabbed my push stick, and plugged in the saw. (As always, safety first.) I started it up and pushed the board through. I only have a 1.5 HP saw, but it cut through the pine like a warm knife through butter. (Maybe this is due to using a good blade instead of the one that came with the saw.) I compared my cut (a rip cut) to the one on the opposite side of the board, a cut made at the original saw mill. My saw produced a far superior cut (of course, the board was originally cut by the mill over two years ago). I went ahead and did a couple of crosscuts followed by a rip along the other edge. I grabbed a framing square and checked my results. It was perfect!

As lame as it may sound, I've decided to frame this board and hang it on the wall of the garage. I wrote "The First Cuts" and the current date on it. (Since I don't plan to sell anything I make, I'll never have a "first dollar" to hang on the wall.)

It was a very satisfying feeling to make those first cuts. I can't wait to get to the local hardwoods dealer and buy some nice stuff to start working with. Now I just need to buy a truck so I don't have to borrow my neighbor's. With our first baby on the way, I know my wife isn't approving a truck purchase, so I'm not even trying.
"....look what I found out back underneath the woodpile!"

GODSPEED,
Frank
 

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The First Cuts

I made my first cuts with my new table saw today. I had no particular need to cut any wood. I just really couldn't wait. I grabbed an old piece of scrap 3/4" pine that I had laying around from a little project I did a couple of years ago. I put on my eye and ear protection, grabbed my push stick, and plugged in the saw. (As always, safety first.) I started it up and pushed the board through. I only have a 1.5 HP saw, but it cut through the pine like a warm knife through butter. (Maybe this is due to using a good blade instead of the one that came with the saw.) I compared my cut (a rip cut) to the one on the opposite side of the board, a cut made at the original saw mill. My saw produced a far superior cut (of course, the board was originally cut by the mill over two years ago). I went ahead and did a couple of crosscuts followed by a rip along the other edge. I grabbed a framing square and checked my results. It was perfect!

As lame as it may sound, I've decided to frame this board and hang it on the wall of the garage. I wrote "The First Cuts" and the current date on it. (Since I don't plan to sell anything I make, I'll never have a "first dollar" to hang on the wall.)

It was a very satisfying feeling to make those first cuts. I can't wait to get to the local hardwoods dealer and buy some nice stuff to start working with. Now I just need to buy a truck so I don't have to borrow my neighbor's. With our first baby on the way, I know my wife isn't approving a truck purchase, so I'm not even trying.
That's what good neighbors are for, isn't it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The First Project Begins

I've decided to build a simple nightstand as my first project (or at least my first project since buying a table saw and joining LumberJocks.com). The basic design of the nightstand comes from a fellow LuberJock. Check out the original here.

Last weekend I bought the lumber, $65 of Red Oak from the local lumberyard with a great hardwood selection. I highly recommend this place (Schutte Lumber) to anybody in the Kansas City area.

I pulled out the mitre saw to chop everything down to rough sizes. The table saw squared up all the edges, producing a much cleaner cut.



Here's my favorite part of the project so far. A friend of mine loaned me his brand new hollow chisel mortiser. He hadn't even assembled it yet. I cleaned off all the grease, put a couple of coats of wax on it, and started it up. You can see the mortiser in the background of the previous photo. After using this thing only once, I know I have to buy one. I loved it!

I'll eventually show off the final product in a LumberJocks project posting. More to come soon, I hope.
 

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The First Project Begins

I've decided to build a simple nightstand as my first project (or at least my first project since buying a table saw and joining LumberJocks.com). The basic design of the nightstand comes from a fellow LuberJock. Check out the original here.

Last weekend I bought the lumber, $65 of Red Oak from the local lumberyard with a great hardwood selection. I highly recommend this place (Schutte Lumber) to anybody in the Kansas City area.

I pulled out the mitre saw to chop everything down to rough sizes. The table saw squared up all the edges, producing a much cleaner cut.



Here's my favorite part of the project so far. A friend of mine loaned me his brand new hollow chisel mortiser. He hadn't even assembled it yet. I cleaned off all the grease, put a couple of coats of wax on it, and started it up. You can see the mortiser in the background of the previous photo. After using this thing only once, I know I have to buy one. I loved it!

I'll eventually show off the final product in a LumberJocks project posting. More to come soon, I hope.
Looks like your off to a great start Joshua. Looking forward to seeing some more posts.
 

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The First Project Begins

I've decided to build a simple nightstand as my first project (or at least my first project since buying a table saw and joining LumberJocks.com). The basic design of the nightstand comes from a fellow LuberJock. Check out the original here.

Last weekend I bought the lumber, $65 of Red Oak from the local lumberyard with a great hardwood selection. I highly recommend this place (Schutte Lumber) to anybody in the Kansas City area.

I pulled out the mitre saw to chop everything down to rough sizes. The table saw squared up all the edges, producing a much cleaner cut.



Here's my favorite part of the project so far. A friend of mine loaned me his brand new hollow chisel mortiser. He hadn't even assembled it yet. I cleaned off all the grease, put a couple of coats of wax on it, and started it up. You can see the mortiser in the background of the previous photo. After using this thing only once, I know I have to buy one. I loved it!

I'll eventually show off the final product in a LumberJocks project posting. More to come soon, I hope.
It's coming along great!
 

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The First Project Begins

I've decided to build a simple nightstand as my first project (or at least my first project since buying a table saw and joining LumberJocks.com). The basic design of the nightstand comes from a fellow LuberJock. Check out the original here.

Last weekend I bought the lumber, $65 of Red Oak from the local lumberyard with a great hardwood selection. I highly recommend this place (Schutte Lumber) to anybody in the Kansas City area.

I pulled out the mitre saw to chop everything down to rough sizes. The table saw squared up all the edges, producing a much cleaner cut.



Here's my favorite part of the project so far. A friend of mine loaned me his brand new hollow chisel mortiser. He hadn't even assembled it yet. I cleaned off all the grease, put a couple of coats of wax on it, and started it up. You can see the mortiser in the background of the previous photo. After using this thing only once, I know I have to buy one. I loved it!

I'll eventually show off the final product in a LumberJocks project posting. More to come soon, I hope.
Good start Josh. We are looking forward to seeing it completed.

You might want to check out Mot's video on the Festool Domino before buying the mortiser. While more expensive, the Domino is more versatile than the mortiser. If you get a chance to use a Domino, you will be hooked.
 

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The First Project Begins

I've decided to build a simple nightstand as my first project (or at least my first project since buying a table saw and joining LumberJocks.com). The basic design of the nightstand comes from a fellow LuberJock. Check out the original here.

Last weekend I bought the lumber, $65 of Red Oak from the local lumberyard with a great hardwood selection. I highly recommend this place (Schutte Lumber) to anybody in the Kansas City area.

I pulled out the mitre saw to chop everything down to rough sizes. The table saw squared up all the edges, producing a much cleaner cut.



Here's my favorite part of the project so far. A friend of mine loaned me his brand new hollow chisel mortiser. He hadn't even assembled it yet. I cleaned off all the grease, put a couple of coats of wax on it, and started it up. You can see the mortiser in the background of the previous photo. After using this thing only once, I know I have to buy one. I loved it!

I'll eventually show off the final product in a LumberJocks project posting. More to come soon, I hope.
cool. Can't wait to see how it turns out.

Another Kansas jock,
Mark
 

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The First Project Begins

I've decided to build a simple nightstand as my first project (or at least my first project since buying a table saw and joining LumberJocks.com). The basic design of the nightstand comes from a fellow LuberJock. Check out the original here.

Last weekend I bought the lumber, $65 of Red Oak from the local lumberyard with a great hardwood selection. I highly recommend this place (Schutte Lumber) to anybody in the Kansas City area.

I pulled out the mitre saw to chop everything down to rough sizes. The table saw squared up all the edges, producing a much cleaner cut.



Here's my favorite part of the project so far. A friend of mine loaned me his brand new hollow chisel mortiser. He hadn't even assembled it yet. I cleaned off all the grease, put a couple of coats of wax on it, and started it up. You can see the mortiser in the background of the previous photo. After using this thing only once, I know I have to buy one. I loved it!

I'll eventually show off the final product in a LumberJocks project posting. More to come soon, I hope.
Josh: great start. It's great seeing someone getting started in this great hobby.
 

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The First Project Begins

I've decided to build a simple nightstand as my first project (or at least my first project since buying a table saw and joining LumberJocks.com). The basic design of the nightstand comes from a fellow LuberJock. Check out the original here.

Last weekend I bought the lumber, $65 of Red Oak from the local lumberyard with a great hardwood selection. I highly recommend this place (Schutte Lumber) to anybody in the Kansas City area.

I pulled out the mitre saw to chop everything down to rough sizes. The table saw squared up all the edges, producing a much cleaner cut.



Here's my favorite part of the project so far. A friend of mine loaned me his brand new hollow chisel mortiser. He hadn't even assembled it yet. I cleaned off all the grease, put a couple of coats of wax on it, and started it up. You can see the mortiser in the background of the previous photo. After using this thing only once, I know I have to buy one. I loved it!

I'll eventually show off the final product in a LumberJocks project posting. More to come soon, I hope.
Starting well Joshua! Great tools help. You have a nice tree to work with for the nightstand. Keep us all posted.
 

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The First Project Begins

I've decided to build a simple nightstand as my first project (or at least my first project since buying a table saw and joining LumberJocks.com). The basic design of the nightstand comes from a fellow LuberJock. Check out the original here.

Last weekend I bought the lumber, $65 of Red Oak from the local lumberyard with a great hardwood selection. I highly recommend this place (Schutte Lumber) to anybody in the Kansas City area.

I pulled out the mitre saw to chop everything down to rough sizes. The table saw squared up all the edges, producing a much cleaner cut.



Here's my favorite part of the project so far. A friend of mine loaned me his brand new hollow chisel mortiser. He hadn't even assembled it yet. I cleaned off all the grease, put a couple of coats of wax on it, and started it up. You can see the mortiser in the background of the previous photo. After using this thing only once, I know I have to buy one. I loved it!

I'll eventually show off the final product in a LumberJocks project posting. More to come soon, I hope.
Have fun with your project Joshua. Keep the progress posts coming!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
A Few Firsts for Me

I've now completed my first mortise and tenon joints. I've also put together my first glue-up panels for the nightstand top and bottom shelf. I had a few problems with the mortiser which were easily fixed with some sharp hand chisels. The tenons were fairly easy with the help of a tenoning jig. (I decided to layout each tenon individually to match the mortise it was going in. If I could produce consistent mortises then I think I could batch cut all of the tenons which would make the process a lot quicker.) The glue-ups were fairly straightforward. Some boards, a jointer, a bisuit joiner and plenty of glue. Notice that the edges of the rightmost board in the larger glueup. After getting everything together and laying in the clamps, I realized that one of my joints had shifted. It was too late. The glue had set a bit (and the biscuits had probably swelled up). The panel was made oversize so I could square it up on the table saw. I'll still be able to get a 20" x 20" panel out of this.

It's a nice feeling when you finally do something and realize that it's not as impossible as it might initially seem.



 

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A Few Firsts for Me

I've now completed my first mortise and tenon joints. I've also put together my first glue-up panels for the nightstand top and bottom shelf. I had a few problems with the mortiser which were easily fixed with some sharp hand chisels. The tenons were fairly easy with the help of a tenoning jig. (I decided to layout each tenon individually to match the mortise it was going in. If I could produce consistent mortises then I think I could batch cut all of the tenons which would make the process a lot quicker.) The glue-ups were fairly straightforward. Some boards, a jointer, a bisuit joiner and plenty of glue. Notice that the edges of the rightmost board in the larger glueup. After getting everything together and laying in the clamps, I realized that one of my joints had shifted. It was too late. The glue had set a bit (and the biscuits had probably swelled up). The panel was made oversize so I could square it up on the table saw. I'll still be able to get a 20" x 20" panel out of this.

It's a nice feeling when you finally do something and realize that it's not as impossible as it might initially seem.



Very nice Joshua. I'm sure you will be cranking out quite a few more projects in short order.
 

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A Few Firsts for Me

I've now completed my first mortise and tenon joints. I've also put together my first glue-up panels for the nightstand top and bottom shelf. I had a few problems with the mortiser which were easily fixed with some sharp hand chisels. The tenons were fairly easy with the help of a tenoning jig. (I decided to layout each tenon individually to match the mortise it was going in. If I could produce consistent mortises then I think I could batch cut all of the tenons which would make the process a lot quicker.) The glue-ups were fairly straightforward. Some boards, a jointer, a bisuit joiner and plenty of glue. Notice that the edges of the rightmost board in the larger glueup. After getting everything together and laying in the clamps, I realized that one of my joints had shifted. It was too late. The glue had set a bit (and the biscuits had probably swelled up). The panel was made oversize so I could square it up on the table saw. I'll still be able to get a 20" x 20" panel out of this.

It's a nice feeling when you finally do something and realize that it's not as impossible as it might initially seem.



Quote: "It's a nice feeling when you finally do something and realize that it's not as impossible as it might initially seem."

I agree! Does wonders for your confidence the next time you start something. Congrats on the progress. Looking forward to more.
 

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A Few Firsts for Me

I've now completed my first mortise and tenon joints. I've also put together my first glue-up panels for the nightstand top and bottom shelf. I had a few problems with the mortiser which were easily fixed with some sharp hand chisels. The tenons were fairly easy with the help of a tenoning jig. (I decided to layout each tenon individually to match the mortise it was going in. If I could produce consistent mortises then I think I could batch cut all of the tenons which would make the process a lot quicker.) The glue-ups were fairly straightforward. Some boards, a jointer, a bisuit joiner and plenty of glue. Notice that the edges of the rightmost board in the larger glueup. After getting everything together and laying in the clamps, I realized that one of my joints had shifted. It was too late. The glue had set a bit (and the biscuits had probably swelled up). The panel was made oversize so I could square it up on the table saw. I'll still be able to get a 20" x 20" panel out of this.

It's a nice feeling when you finally do something and realize that it's not as impossible as it might initially seem.



Bravo.

Confidence comes from experience.
Experience comes from taking risks.
Risks comes from.. ah… ah… confidence?? lol

Well done and looking good
 

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A Few Firsts for Me

I've now completed my first mortise and tenon joints. I've also put together my first glue-up panels for the nightstand top and bottom shelf. I had a few problems with the mortiser which were easily fixed with some sharp hand chisels. The tenons were fairly easy with the help of a tenoning jig. (I decided to layout each tenon individually to match the mortise it was going in. If I could produce consistent mortises then I think I could batch cut all of the tenons which would make the process a lot quicker.) The glue-ups were fairly straightforward. Some boards, a jointer, a bisuit joiner and plenty of glue. Notice that the edges of the rightmost board in the larger glueup. After getting everything together and laying in the clamps, I realized that one of my joints had shifted. It was too late. The glue had set a bit (and the biscuits had probably swelled up). The panel was made oversize so I could square it up on the table saw. I'll still be able to get a 20" x 20" panel out of this.

It's a nice feeling when you finally do something and realize that it's not as impossible as it might initially seem.



Great job!

I couldn't agree with you more. It's amazing how it feels the 1st time you do something succesfully….Hey! I did it! ....HEY! I DID IT!!!,,,,,Cool.

Lol….words of wisdom from Deb as usual….all life needs is a kick start!
 

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A Few Firsts for Me

I've now completed my first mortise and tenon joints. I've also put together my first glue-up panels for the nightstand top and bottom shelf. I had a few problems with the mortiser which were easily fixed with some sharp hand chisels. The tenons were fairly easy with the help of a tenoning jig. (I decided to layout each tenon individually to match the mortise it was going in. If I could produce consistent mortises then I think I could batch cut all of the tenons which would make the process a lot quicker.) The glue-ups were fairly straightforward. Some boards, a jointer, a bisuit joiner and plenty of glue. Notice that the edges of the rightmost board in the larger glueup. After getting everything together and laying in the clamps, I realized that one of my joints had shifted. It was too late. The glue had set a bit (and the biscuits had probably swelled up). The panel was made oversize so I could square it up on the table saw. I'll still be able to get a 20" x 20" panel out of this.

It's a nice feeling when you finally do something and realize that it's not as impossible as it might initially seem.



Nice job! Don't worry about panels. Always make them oversize, then you don't have the get hung up on aligning the glueup. Really a nice job! There are a couple of different schools of thought, but I like to take care of glue squeeze out with a damp sponge right away. I know others like to scrape it when it just sets. Others don't mind planing or sanding it off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
A Few Firsts for Me

I've now completed my first mortise and tenon joints. I've also put together my first glue-up panels for the nightstand top and bottom shelf. I had a few problems with the mortiser which were easily fixed with some sharp hand chisels. The tenons were fairly easy with the help of a tenoning jig. (I decided to layout each tenon individually to match the mortise it was going in. If I could produce consistent mortises then I think I could batch cut all of the tenons which would make the process a lot quicker.) The glue-ups were fairly straightforward. Some boards, a jointer, a bisuit joiner and plenty of glue. Notice that the edges of the rightmost board in the larger glueup. After getting everything together and laying in the clamps, I realized that one of my joints had shifted. It was too late. The glue had set a bit (and the biscuits had probably swelled up). The panel was made oversize so I could square it up on the table saw. I'll still be able to get a 20" x 20" panel out of this.

It's a nice feeling when you finally do something and realize that it's not as impossible as it might initially seem.



I tried to get a damp cloth on it quickly, but could only get one side of the panel in time. What you're seeing on the small panel is the under side. By the time I got done wiping the squeeze out off of the top side, the bottom side had setup just enough that wiping it off seemed to cause more harm than good. I have to sand everything smooth anyway, so I'll start out with something gritty enough to get that glue off.
 
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