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Hi, I'm having a problem with my 6" jointer, it was made in 1948, I have owned it for about 35 years. Recently it started to give me tapered boards, witch means it is not coplanar (right). When I put a straight edge on it, with both tables level with the blades at TDC the infeed table drops off the thickness of a fold sheet of paper. As you lower the infeeed table the gap seems to get bigger.

Any help you can offer will be helpful.
 

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I'm no expert on vintage machinery, but usually there is a gib screw that adjusts the dovetail ways. That design is pretty old, and hasn't changed much over the years. Do you have adjustment screws on the back of the jointer near the dovetail ways?
 

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Is it a 37-205/207? If so, I don't think there are any real table adjustments.. make sure the bolt holding the infeed table to the base hasn't loosened up too much, and if it's good, then you will probably need to shim.

Cheers,
Brad
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi, Willie There are gib screw on the back, I did tighten those and took the side to side movment out, but did little to help the coplanar problem. Did I tighten them to much???
Sorry Mike your right it is 66 not 70, (never was good with math)

Brad I can't find a model # on it, but looks like photos of a 37-205. I checked and everything seems to be tight.

Thanks Joel
 

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Did you check the gib screws on both tables. They should be tightened until you feel the table starting to resist being moved up or down - then back off a tiny bit and they're perfect.

If it's still out of adjustment after that, you probably need shimming. Shimming is not difficult.

It's best to shim the outfeed side because it gets adjusted less frequently than the infeed. Use a known-good straight edge to test coplaner and insert brass shim stock into the dovetail ways between the base casting and the table.

It's a process of trial and error.

LEE VALLEY sells a variety pack of brass shim stock for cheap.

Mike
 
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