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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have form...will bend

Scope of work: Replace transom (subject to change)
Vessel: 56' Schooner
Material: Sapele

So, we're a couple of weeks into our repair and restoration class here at the "boat school" and we have something like 8 boats we're working on between the 16 students in the class. One of which I will be working on is the replacement of the transom on a 56 foot wooden Schooner. For those who are not familiar with boats and related terminology, the transom, on a boat is the surface that forms the stern or "tail end" of a boat. (Pictures following)

Now, this is a large piece of wood that we are going to wreck out of the boat, while preserving as much of the planking and internal framework as possible. Once the original transom comes out, the scope of work may change to include more if there is any rot present in the internal structure, planking, or decking. To give you some scale of this project, the transom on this 56 foot boat is about 7 feet wide and 44 inches from top to bottom and 3 7/8+ inches thick. Did I mention that it's a curved and raked transom? A big curvaceous and important chunk of this boat! So, in this series of blog posts, I'll be documenting our progress.

First order of business, obtain the camber or radius of the transom. And the only way to do that was to visit said boat, and get into another boat. So we devised a plan, grabbed the tools and hot melt glue gun, several lengths of door skin and hit the water.

In this first photo we're using hot melt glue to fix blocks along the transom to rest the door skin on so we can spile or scribe if you will, the cruve of the transom. Don't worry ma'am, your're boat is in good hands, we're training to be professionals!


Once we obtained that critical bit of info, we were back at the shop. Now, rather than carve this transom from solid stock, it was determined that we would make this transom out of laminated stock. Ok, sounds easy. But there's still the matter of the curve. So, we took the curve we obtained, laid it out on the bench, faired it up, then transfered that to some 2×8's and cut the curve out on the bandsaw. This was the beginnings of our bending form. We spent the better part of a day building a bending form that eventually all 7-8 lifts will be glued up on.

What might you ask are we making this transom out of? Well, it appears that we wood workers have used up just about all of the teak, hondo mahogany, and other exotic trees for our handiwork, that now we're using Sapele for our boats. It's in the mahogany family, and relatively nice stuff to work with. We milled all of our 4/4 stock to the dimensions we needed and set to work.

Here's a shot of the bending form.


And here's a shot of that Sapele.


The sapele bends pretty easy around that radius and did not fight us much. We did have two clamps go flying today though. As of this afternoon, we have glued up 3 lifts, and will be continuing tomorrow. So, I'll leave you with a look at one of our lifts on the bending form. This should prove to be a great project for all those involved, and I can't wait to get down to the boat yard. The Schooner is hauling out tomorrow!

And here's the first of many glue-ups that I'll be doing this week.
 

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1,930 Posts
Have form...will bend

Scope of work: Replace transom (subject to change)
Vessel: 56' Schooner
Material: Sapele

So, we're a couple of weeks into our repair and restoration class here at the "boat school" and we have something like 8 boats we're working on between the 16 students in the class. One of which I will be working on is the replacement of the transom on a 56 foot wooden Schooner. For those who are not familiar with boats and related terminology, the transom, on a boat is the surface that forms the stern or "tail end" of a boat. (Pictures following)

Now, this is a large piece of wood that we are going to wreck out of the boat, while preserving as much of the planking and internal framework as possible. Once the original transom comes out, the scope of work may change to include more if there is any rot present in the internal structure, planking, or decking. To give you some scale of this project, the transom on this 56 foot boat is about 7 feet wide and 44 inches from top to bottom and 3 7/8+ inches thick. Did I mention that it's a curved and raked transom? A big curvaceous and important chunk of this boat! So, in this series of blog posts, I'll be documenting our progress.

First order of business, obtain the camber or radius of the transom. And the only way to do that was to visit said boat, and get into another boat. So we devised a plan, grabbed the tools and hot melt glue gun, several lengths of door skin and hit the water.

In this first photo we're using hot melt glue to fix blocks along the transom to rest the door skin on so we can spile or scribe if you will, the cruve of the transom. Don't worry ma'am, your're boat is in good hands, we're training to be professionals!


Once we obtained that critical bit of info, we were back at the shop. Now, rather than carve this transom from solid stock, it was determined that we would make this transom out of laminated stock. Ok, sounds easy. But there's still the matter of the curve. So, we took the curve we obtained, laid it out on the bench, faired it up, then transfered that to some 2×8's and cut the curve out on the bandsaw. This was the beginnings of our bending form. We spent the better part of a day building a bending form that eventually all 7-8 lifts will be glued up on.

What might you ask are we making this transom out of? Well, it appears that we wood workers have used up just about all of the teak, hondo mahogany, and other exotic trees for our handiwork, that now we're using Sapele for our boats. It's in the mahogany family, and relatively nice stuff to work with. We milled all of our 4/4 stock to the dimensions we needed and set to work.

Here's a shot of the bending form.


And here's a shot of that Sapele.


The sapele bends pretty easy around that radius and did not fight us much. We did have two clamps go flying today though. As of this afternoon, we have glued up 3 lifts, and will be continuing tomorrow. So, I'll leave you with a look at one of our lifts on the bending form. This should prove to be a great project for all those involved, and I can't wait to get down to the boat yard. The Schooner is hauling out tomorrow!

And here's the first of many glue-ups that I'll be doing this week.
Looking good!

Thanks for the post

Callum
 

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Registered
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365 Posts
Have form...will bend

Scope of work: Replace transom (subject to change)
Vessel: 56' Schooner
Material: Sapele

So, we're a couple of weeks into our repair and restoration class here at the "boat school" and we have something like 8 boats we're working on between the 16 students in the class. One of which I will be working on is the replacement of the transom on a 56 foot wooden Schooner. For those who are not familiar with boats and related terminology, the transom, on a boat is the surface that forms the stern or "tail end" of a boat. (Pictures following)

Now, this is a large piece of wood that we are going to wreck out of the boat, while preserving as much of the planking and internal framework as possible. Once the original transom comes out, the scope of work may change to include more if there is any rot present in the internal structure, planking, or decking. To give you some scale of this project, the transom on this 56 foot boat is about 7 feet wide and 44 inches from top to bottom and 3 7/8+ inches thick. Did I mention that it's a curved and raked transom? A big curvaceous and important chunk of this boat! So, in this series of blog posts, I'll be documenting our progress.

First order of business, obtain the camber or radius of the transom. And the only way to do that was to visit said boat, and get into another boat. So we devised a plan, grabbed the tools and hot melt glue gun, several lengths of door skin and hit the water.

In this first photo we're using hot melt glue to fix blocks along the transom to rest the door skin on so we can spile or scribe if you will, the cruve of the transom. Don't worry ma'am, your're boat is in good hands, we're training to be professionals!


Once we obtained that critical bit of info, we were back at the shop. Now, rather than carve this transom from solid stock, it was determined that we would make this transom out of laminated stock. Ok, sounds easy. But there's still the matter of the curve. So, we took the curve we obtained, laid it out on the bench, faired it up, then transfered that to some 2×8's and cut the curve out on the bandsaw. This was the beginnings of our bending form. We spent the better part of a day building a bending form that eventually all 7-8 lifts will be glued up on.

What might you ask are we making this transom out of? Well, it appears that we wood workers have used up just about all of the teak, hondo mahogany, and other exotic trees for our handiwork, that now we're using Sapele for our boats. It's in the mahogany family, and relatively nice stuff to work with. We milled all of our 4/4 stock to the dimensions we needed and set to work.

Here's a shot of the bending form.


And here's a shot of that Sapele.


The sapele bends pretty easy around that radius and did not fight us much. We did have two clamps go flying today though. As of this afternoon, we have glued up 3 lifts, and will be continuing tomorrow. So, I'll leave you with a look at one of our lifts on the bending form. This should prove to be a great project for all those involved, and I can't wait to get down to the boat yard. The Schooner is hauling out tomorrow!

And here's the first of many glue-ups that I'll be doing this week.
Brian - good on you - this blog is going to be a blast. Isn't the peninsula just a beautiful place to learn something new in woodworking!
 

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Have form...will bend

Scope of work: Replace transom (subject to change)
Vessel: 56' Schooner
Material: Sapele

So, we're a couple of weeks into our repair and restoration class here at the "boat school" and we have something like 8 boats we're working on between the 16 students in the class. One of which I will be working on is the replacement of the transom on a 56 foot wooden Schooner. For those who are not familiar with boats and related terminology, the transom, on a boat is the surface that forms the stern or "tail end" of a boat. (Pictures following)

Now, this is a large piece of wood that we are going to wreck out of the boat, while preserving as much of the planking and internal framework as possible. Once the original transom comes out, the scope of work may change to include more if there is any rot present in the internal structure, planking, or decking. To give you some scale of this project, the transom on this 56 foot boat is about 7 feet wide and 44 inches from top to bottom and 3 7/8+ inches thick. Did I mention that it's a curved and raked transom? A big curvaceous and important chunk of this boat! So, in this series of blog posts, I'll be documenting our progress.

First order of business, obtain the camber or radius of the transom. And the only way to do that was to visit said boat, and get into another boat. So we devised a plan, grabbed the tools and hot melt glue gun, several lengths of door skin and hit the water.

In this first photo we're using hot melt glue to fix blocks along the transom to rest the door skin on so we can spile or scribe if you will, the cruve of the transom. Don't worry ma'am, your're boat is in good hands, we're training to be professionals!


Once we obtained that critical bit of info, we were back at the shop. Now, rather than carve this transom from solid stock, it was determined that we would make this transom out of laminated stock. Ok, sounds easy. But there's still the matter of the curve. So, we took the curve we obtained, laid it out on the bench, faired it up, then transfered that to some 2×8's and cut the curve out on the bandsaw. This was the beginnings of our bending form. We spent the better part of a day building a bending form that eventually all 7-8 lifts will be glued up on.

What might you ask are we making this transom out of? Well, it appears that we wood workers have used up just about all of the teak, hondo mahogany, and other exotic trees for our handiwork, that now we're using Sapele for our boats. It's in the mahogany family, and relatively nice stuff to work with. We milled all of our 4/4 stock to the dimensions we needed and set to work.

Here's a shot of the bending form.


And here's a shot of that Sapele.


The sapele bends pretty easy around that radius and did not fight us much. We did have two clamps go flying today though. As of this afternoon, we have glued up 3 lifts, and will be continuing tomorrow. So, I'll leave you with a look at one of our lifts on the bending form. This should prove to be a great project for all those involved, and I can't wait to get down to the boat yard. The Schooner is hauling out tomorrow!

And here's the first of many glue-ups that I'll be doing this week.
Wow… I wish I could be there. I am more than a little jealous.
 

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Registered
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470 Posts
Have form...will bend

Scope of work: Replace transom (subject to change)
Vessel: 56' Schooner
Material: Sapele

So, we're a couple of weeks into our repair and restoration class here at the "boat school" and we have something like 8 boats we're working on between the 16 students in the class. One of which I will be working on is the replacement of the transom on a 56 foot wooden Schooner. For those who are not familiar with boats and related terminology, the transom, on a boat is the surface that forms the stern or "tail end" of a boat. (Pictures following)

Now, this is a large piece of wood that we are going to wreck out of the boat, while preserving as much of the planking and internal framework as possible. Once the original transom comes out, the scope of work may change to include more if there is any rot present in the internal structure, planking, or decking. To give you some scale of this project, the transom on this 56 foot boat is about 7 feet wide and 44 inches from top to bottom and 3 7/8+ inches thick. Did I mention that it's a curved and raked transom? A big curvaceous and important chunk of this boat! So, in this series of blog posts, I'll be documenting our progress.

First order of business, obtain the camber or radius of the transom. And the only way to do that was to visit said boat, and get into another boat. So we devised a plan, grabbed the tools and hot melt glue gun, several lengths of door skin and hit the water.

In this first photo we're using hot melt glue to fix blocks along the transom to rest the door skin on so we can spile or scribe if you will, the cruve of the transom. Don't worry ma'am, your're boat is in good hands, we're training to be professionals!


Once we obtained that critical bit of info, we were back at the shop. Now, rather than carve this transom from solid stock, it was determined that we would make this transom out of laminated stock. Ok, sounds easy. But there's still the matter of the curve. So, we took the curve we obtained, laid it out on the bench, faired it up, then transfered that to some 2×8's and cut the curve out on the bandsaw. This was the beginnings of our bending form. We spent the better part of a day building a bending form that eventually all 7-8 lifts will be glued up on.

What might you ask are we making this transom out of? Well, it appears that we wood workers have used up just about all of the teak, hondo mahogany, and other exotic trees for our handiwork, that now we're using Sapele for our boats. It's in the mahogany family, and relatively nice stuff to work with. We milled all of our 4/4 stock to the dimensions we needed and set to work.

Here's a shot of the bending form.


And here's a shot of that Sapele.


The sapele bends pretty easy around that radius and did not fight us much. We did have two clamps go flying today though. As of this afternoon, we have glued up 3 lifts, and will be continuing tomorrow. So, I'll leave you with a look at one of our lifts on the bending form. This should prove to be a great project for all those involved, and I can't wait to get down to the boat yard. The Schooner is hauling out tomorrow!

And here's the first of many glue-ups that I'll be doing this week.
I'm waiting to find out that the horn timber, knees, and parts of the shelf & clamp, perhaps even the afterdeck are all going to need to be scarfed in. It's a lot easier to do when she's on the hard! Thanks for the posts!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Have form...will bend

Scope of work: Replace transom (subject to change)
Vessel: 56' Schooner
Material: Sapele

So, we're a couple of weeks into our repair and restoration class here at the "boat school" and we have something like 8 boats we're working on between the 16 students in the class. One of which I will be working on is the replacement of the transom on a 56 foot wooden Schooner. For those who are not familiar with boats and related terminology, the transom, on a boat is the surface that forms the stern or "tail end" of a boat. (Pictures following)

Now, this is a large piece of wood that we are going to wreck out of the boat, while preserving as much of the planking and internal framework as possible. Once the original transom comes out, the scope of work may change to include more if there is any rot present in the internal structure, planking, or decking. To give you some scale of this project, the transom on this 56 foot boat is about 7 feet wide and 44 inches from top to bottom and 3 7/8+ inches thick. Did I mention that it's a curved and raked transom? A big curvaceous and important chunk of this boat! So, in this series of blog posts, I'll be documenting our progress.

First order of business, obtain the camber or radius of the transom. And the only way to do that was to visit said boat, and get into another boat. So we devised a plan, grabbed the tools and hot melt glue gun, several lengths of door skin and hit the water.

In this first photo we're using hot melt glue to fix blocks along the transom to rest the door skin on so we can spile or scribe if you will, the cruve of the transom. Don't worry ma'am, your're boat is in good hands, we're training to be professionals!


Once we obtained that critical bit of info, we were back at the shop. Now, rather than carve this transom from solid stock, it was determined that we would make this transom out of laminated stock. Ok, sounds easy. But there's still the matter of the curve. So, we took the curve we obtained, laid it out on the bench, faired it up, then transfered that to some 2×8's and cut the curve out on the bandsaw. This was the beginnings of our bending form. We spent the better part of a day building a bending form that eventually all 7-8 lifts will be glued up on.

What might you ask are we making this transom out of? Well, it appears that we wood workers have used up just about all of the teak, hondo mahogany, and other exotic trees for our handiwork, that now we're using Sapele for our boats. It's in the mahogany family, and relatively nice stuff to work with. We milled all of our 4/4 stock to the dimensions we needed and set to work.

Here's a shot of the bending form.


And here's a shot of that Sapele.


The sapele bends pretty easy around that radius and did not fight us much. We did have two clamps go flying today though. As of this afternoon, we have glued up 3 lifts, and will be continuing tomorrow. So, I'll leave you with a look at one of our lifts on the bending form. This should prove to be a great project for all those involved, and I can't wait to get down to the boat yard. The Schooner is hauling out tomorrow!

And here's the first of many glue-ups that I'll be doing this week.
This project should be one to remember for sure!
Indeed the Olympic Peninsula is a great place to learn this wooden boat building stuff, Stanley2.
In some ways, I wish I could stay here longer, but I'm a Southern boy, and I just can't keep myself away from home for too long.

Hey Texasgaloot, sounds like you know your boat building…we'll see about all the above mentioned pieces. She was hauled out today at noon, blocked and shored with jacks. Tomorrow, we should be wrecking out so we'll see what lies beneath. Stay tuned.
 

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Have form...will bend

Scope of work: Replace transom (subject to change)
Vessel: 56' Schooner
Material: Sapele

So, we're a couple of weeks into our repair and restoration class here at the "boat school" and we have something like 8 boats we're working on between the 16 students in the class. One of which I will be working on is the replacement of the transom on a 56 foot wooden Schooner. For those who are not familiar with boats and related terminology, the transom, on a boat is the surface that forms the stern or "tail end" of a boat. (Pictures following)

Now, this is a large piece of wood that we are going to wreck out of the boat, while preserving as much of the planking and internal framework as possible. Once the original transom comes out, the scope of work may change to include more if there is any rot present in the internal structure, planking, or decking. To give you some scale of this project, the transom on this 56 foot boat is about 7 feet wide and 44 inches from top to bottom and 3 7/8+ inches thick. Did I mention that it's a curved and raked transom? A big curvaceous and important chunk of this boat! So, in this series of blog posts, I'll be documenting our progress.

First order of business, obtain the camber or radius of the transom. And the only way to do that was to visit said boat, and get into another boat. So we devised a plan, grabbed the tools and hot melt glue gun, several lengths of door skin and hit the water.

In this first photo we're using hot melt glue to fix blocks along the transom to rest the door skin on so we can spile or scribe if you will, the cruve of the transom. Don't worry ma'am, your're boat is in good hands, we're training to be professionals!


Once we obtained that critical bit of info, we were back at the shop. Now, rather than carve this transom from solid stock, it was determined that we would make this transom out of laminated stock. Ok, sounds easy. But there's still the matter of the curve. So, we took the curve we obtained, laid it out on the bench, faired it up, then transfered that to some 2×8's and cut the curve out on the bandsaw. This was the beginnings of our bending form. We spent the better part of a day building a bending form that eventually all 7-8 lifts will be glued up on.

What might you ask are we making this transom out of? Well, it appears that we wood workers have used up just about all of the teak, hondo mahogany, and other exotic trees for our handiwork, that now we're using Sapele for our boats. It's in the mahogany family, and relatively nice stuff to work with. We milled all of our 4/4 stock to the dimensions we needed and set to work.

Here's a shot of the bending form.


And here's a shot of that Sapele.


The sapele bends pretty easy around that radius and did not fight us much. We did have two clamps go flying today though. As of this afternoon, we have glued up 3 lifts, and will be continuing tomorrow. So, I'll leave you with a look at one of our lifts on the bending form. This should prove to be a great project for all those involved, and I can't wait to get down to the boat yard. The Schooner is hauling out tomorrow!

And here's the first of many glue-ups that I'll be doing this week.
What are you using for the glue.

Looks interesting. You state that the transom is 44" wide but you are blueing up smaller planks. I hope this all goes together OK.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Have form...will bend

Scope of work: Replace transom (subject to change)
Vessel: 56' Schooner
Material: Sapele

So, we're a couple of weeks into our repair and restoration class here at the "boat school" and we have something like 8 boats we're working on between the 16 students in the class. One of which I will be working on is the replacement of the transom on a 56 foot wooden Schooner. For those who are not familiar with boats and related terminology, the transom, on a boat is the surface that forms the stern or "tail end" of a boat. (Pictures following)

Now, this is a large piece of wood that we are going to wreck out of the boat, while preserving as much of the planking and internal framework as possible. Once the original transom comes out, the scope of work may change to include more if there is any rot present in the internal structure, planking, or decking. To give you some scale of this project, the transom on this 56 foot boat is about 7 feet wide and 44 inches from top to bottom and 3 7/8+ inches thick. Did I mention that it's a curved and raked transom? A big curvaceous and important chunk of this boat! So, in this series of blog posts, I'll be documenting our progress.

First order of business, obtain the camber or radius of the transom. And the only way to do that was to visit said boat, and get into another boat. So we devised a plan, grabbed the tools and hot melt glue gun, several lengths of door skin and hit the water.

In this first photo we're using hot melt glue to fix blocks along the transom to rest the door skin on so we can spile or scribe if you will, the cruve of the transom. Don't worry ma'am, your're boat is in good hands, we're training to be professionals!


Once we obtained that critical bit of info, we were back at the shop. Now, rather than carve this transom from solid stock, it was determined that we would make this transom out of laminated stock. Ok, sounds easy. But there's still the matter of the curve. So, we took the curve we obtained, laid it out on the bench, faired it up, then transfered that to some 2×8's and cut the curve out on the bandsaw. This was the beginnings of our bending form. We spent the better part of a day building a bending form that eventually all 7-8 lifts will be glued up on.

What might you ask are we making this transom out of? Well, it appears that we wood workers have used up just about all of the teak, hondo mahogany, and other exotic trees for our handiwork, that now we're using Sapele for our boats. It's in the mahogany family, and relatively nice stuff to work with. We milled all of our 4/4 stock to the dimensions we needed and set to work.

Here's a shot of the bending form.


And here's a shot of that Sapele.


The sapele bends pretty easy around that radius and did not fight us much. We did have two clamps go flying today though. As of this afternoon, we have glued up 3 lifts, and will be continuing tomorrow. So, I'll leave you with a look at one of our lifts on the bending form. This should prove to be a great project for all those involved, and I can't wait to get down to the boat yard. The Schooner is hauling out tomorrow!

And here's the first of many glue-ups that I'll be doing this week.
We're using West Sytems epoxy for the glue-ups. Not really glue, but sounds better than epoxy-up. ;)
As for the dimensions of the transom, they are as follows;
at its widest point it is close to 7 feet
at it's tallest point it is close to 44 inches
and it is just a hair under 4 inches in thickness.
We've milled everything up as needed, thanks for your concern though…measure twice, cut once.
 

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35,383 Posts
Have form...will bend

Scope of work: Replace transom (subject to change)
Vessel: 56' Schooner
Material: Sapele

So, we're a couple of weeks into our repair and restoration class here at the "boat school" and we have something like 8 boats we're working on between the 16 students in the class. One of which I will be working on is the replacement of the transom on a 56 foot wooden Schooner. For those who are not familiar with boats and related terminology, the transom, on a boat is the surface that forms the stern or "tail end" of a boat. (Pictures following)

Now, this is a large piece of wood that we are going to wreck out of the boat, while preserving as much of the planking and internal framework as possible. Once the original transom comes out, the scope of work may change to include more if there is any rot present in the internal structure, planking, or decking. To give you some scale of this project, the transom on this 56 foot boat is about 7 feet wide and 44 inches from top to bottom and 3 7/8+ inches thick. Did I mention that it's a curved and raked transom? A big curvaceous and important chunk of this boat! So, in this series of blog posts, I'll be documenting our progress.

First order of business, obtain the camber or radius of the transom. And the only way to do that was to visit said boat, and get into another boat. So we devised a plan, grabbed the tools and hot melt glue gun, several lengths of door skin and hit the water.

In this first photo we're using hot melt glue to fix blocks along the transom to rest the door skin on so we can spile or scribe if you will, the cruve of the transom. Don't worry ma'am, your're boat is in good hands, we're training to be professionals!


Once we obtained that critical bit of info, we were back at the shop. Now, rather than carve this transom from solid stock, it was determined that we would make this transom out of laminated stock. Ok, sounds easy. But there's still the matter of the curve. So, we took the curve we obtained, laid it out on the bench, faired it up, then transfered that to some 2×8's and cut the curve out on the bandsaw. This was the beginnings of our bending form. We spent the better part of a day building a bending form that eventually all 7-8 lifts will be glued up on.

What might you ask are we making this transom out of? Well, it appears that we wood workers have used up just about all of the teak, hondo mahogany, and other exotic trees for our handiwork, that now we're using Sapele for our boats. It's in the mahogany family, and relatively nice stuff to work with. We milled all of our 4/4 stock to the dimensions we needed and set to work.

Here's a shot of the bending form.


And here's a shot of that Sapele.


The sapele bends pretty easy around that radius and did not fight us much. We did have two clamps go flying today though. As of this afternoon, we have glued up 3 lifts, and will be continuing tomorrow. So, I'll leave you with a look at one of our lifts on the bending form. This should prove to be a great project for all those involved, and I can't wait to get down to the boat yard. The Schooner is hauling out tomorrow!

And here's the first of many glue-ups that I'll be doing this week.
What I was referring to is the way that you seem to be epoxy-up the transom. It looks like you are making it only one board wide. Are you going to "glue up" 44 inches high and then cut the transom out of the block of wood, or are you going to make more blocks like you have shown and join them together side-by-side to get the 44"?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Have form...will bend

Scope of work: Replace transom (subject to change)
Vessel: 56' Schooner
Material: Sapele

So, we're a couple of weeks into our repair and restoration class here at the "boat school" and we have something like 8 boats we're working on between the 16 students in the class. One of which I will be working on is the replacement of the transom on a 56 foot wooden Schooner. For those who are not familiar with boats and related terminology, the transom, on a boat is the surface that forms the stern or "tail end" of a boat. (Pictures following)

Now, this is a large piece of wood that we are going to wreck out of the boat, while preserving as much of the planking and internal framework as possible. Once the original transom comes out, the scope of work may change to include more if there is any rot present in the internal structure, planking, or decking. To give you some scale of this project, the transom on this 56 foot boat is about 7 feet wide and 44 inches from top to bottom and 3 7/8+ inches thick. Did I mention that it's a curved and raked transom? A big curvaceous and important chunk of this boat! So, in this series of blog posts, I'll be documenting our progress.

First order of business, obtain the camber or radius of the transom. And the only way to do that was to visit said boat, and get into another boat. So we devised a plan, grabbed the tools and hot melt glue gun, several lengths of door skin and hit the water.

In this first photo we're using hot melt glue to fix blocks along the transom to rest the door skin on so we can spile or scribe if you will, the cruve of the transom. Don't worry ma'am, your're boat is in good hands, we're training to be professionals!


Once we obtained that critical bit of info, we were back at the shop. Now, rather than carve this transom from solid stock, it was determined that we would make this transom out of laminated stock. Ok, sounds easy. But there's still the matter of the curve. So, we took the curve we obtained, laid it out on the bench, faired it up, then transfered that to some 2×8's and cut the curve out on the bandsaw. This was the beginnings of our bending form. We spent the better part of a day building a bending form that eventually all 7-8 lifts will be glued up on.

What might you ask are we making this transom out of? Well, it appears that we wood workers have used up just about all of the teak, hondo mahogany, and other exotic trees for our handiwork, that now we're using Sapele for our boats. It's in the mahogany family, and relatively nice stuff to work with. We milled all of our 4/4 stock to the dimensions we needed and set to work.

Here's a shot of the bending form.


And here's a shot of that Sapele.


The sapele bends pretty easy around that radius and did not fight us much. We did have two clamps go flying today though. As of this afternoon, we have glued up 3 lifts, and will be continuing tomorrow. So, I'll leave you with a look at one of our lifts on the bending form. This should prove to be a great project for all those involved, and I can't wait to get down to the boat yard. The Schooner is hauling out tomorrow!

And here's the first of many glue-ups that I'll be doing this week.
Sorry Karson I misunderstood. Let me explain better what we are doing.
First we took 4/4 stock and planed it down to 3/4" x 7" in length.
Next we ripped that stock to width. We ripped all the stock wider than needed.
Some are 6 1/2" and some are 7 1/2".

Once we have the thickness and width we need, we are laminating 6 planks, 3/4" together. We need 4" in thickness when it's done. Once glued up, the unit made of 6 planks, we are calling a lift. There will be somewhere between 6-8 lifts that will then be through bolted together on edge. This will yield a large blank, somewhere around 7 feet wide, over 44 inches tall and have a thickness of 4 inches. From this large rectangle. we will then cut out our shape.

Once I get more pictures up here, I think it will become clear as to what we are doing.
 

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Have form...will bend

Scope of work: Replace transom (subject to change)
Vessel: 56' Schooner
Material: Sapele

So, we're a couple of weeks into our repair and restoration class here at the "boat school" and we have something like 8 boats we're working on between the 16 students in the class. One of which I will be working on is the replacement of the transom on a 56 foot wooden Schooner. For those who are not familiar with boats and related terminology, the transom, on a boat is the surface that forms the stern or "tail end" of a boat. (Pictures following)

Now, this is a large piece of wood that we are going to wreck out of the boat, while preserving as much of the planking and internal framework as possible. Once the original transom comes out, the scope of work may change to include more if there is any rot present in the internal structure, planking, or decking. To give you some scale of this project, the transom on this 56 foot boat is about 7 feet wide and 44 inches from top to bottom and 3 7/8+ inches thick. Did I mention that it's a curved and raked transom? A big curvaceous and important chunk of this boat! So, in this series of blog posts, I'll be documenting our progress.

First order of business, obtain the camber or radius of the transom. And the only way to do that was to visit said boat, and get into another boat. So we devised a plan, grabbed the tools and hot melt glue gun, several lengths of door skin and hit the water.

In this first photo we're using hot melt glue to fix blocks along the transom to rest the door skin on so we can spile or scribe if you will, the cruve of the transom. Don't worry ma'am, your're boat is in good hands, we're training to be professionals!


Once we obtained that critical bit of info, we were back at the shop. Now, rather than carve this transom from solid stock, it was determined that we would make this transom out of laminated stock. Ok, sounds easy. But there's still the matter of the curve. So, we took the curve we obtained, laid it out on the bench, faired it up, then transfered that to some 2×8's and cut the curve out on the bandsaw. This was the beginnings of our bending form. We spent the better part of a day building a bending form that eventually all 7-8 lifts will be glued up on.

What might you ask are we making this transom out of? Well, it appears that we wood workers have used up just about all of the teak, hondo mahogany, and other exotic trees for our handiwork, that now we're using Sapele for our boats. It's in the mahogany family, and relatively nice stuff to work with. We milled all of our 4/4 stock to the dimensions we needed and set to work.

Here's a shot of the bending form.


And here's a shot of that Sapele.


The sapele bends pretty easy around that radius and did not fight us much. We did have two clamps go flying today though. As of this afternoon, we have glued up 3 lifts, and will be continuing tomorrow. So, I'll leave you with a look at one of our lifts on the bending form. This should prove to be a great project for all those involved, and I can't wait to get down to the boat yard. The Schooner is hauling out tomorrow!

And here's the first of many glue-ups that I'll be doing this week.
Thanks. Make sure you show us the through bolting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Here's a look at the project

The boat hauled out today and is now on the hard. Just prior to the boat leaving the water, we had a chance to get on board and peek around and see what's ahead of us. Then right at 12:30 pm the travel lift pulled her up and out. We sprayed her bottom off, and then she was moved to her new home for the next several weeks. We got to work at about 1:30 surveying the boat, outside and in to see how to best approach the wrecking out of the the old transom, and to see if there are any other places of the boat that may need attention.

And as with any old wooden boat, there were plenty of those problem places. The scope of work just may change in a few days depending on the condition of wood around, under and just forward of the transom. So, since it's late and I'm tired. I'm only going to post one picture tonight. Hopefully tomorrow I'll be able to update with more photos.

(FYI- I did photoshop this photo, but only to remove the boats name from the transom, and I chopped my poor friends head off as well)
 

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Here's a look at the project

The boat hauled out today and is now on the hard. Just prior to the boat leaving the water, we had a chance to get on board and peek around and see what's ahead of us. Then right at 12:30 pm the travel lift pulled her up and out. We sprayed her bottom off, and then she was moved to her new home for the next several weeks. We got to work at about 1:30 surveying the boat, outside and in to see how to best approach the wrecking out of the the old transom, and to see if there are any other places of the boat that may need attention.

And as with any old wooden boat, there were plenty of those problem places. The scope of work just may change in a few days depending on the condition of wood around, under and just forward of the transom. So, since it's late and I'm tired. I'm only going to post one picture tonight. Hopefully tomorrow I'll be able to update with more photos.

(FYI- I did photoshop this photo, but only to remove the boats name from the transom, and I chopped my poor friends head off as well)
Nice project!

Thanks for the post

Callum
 

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Here's a look at the project

The boat hauled out today and is now on the hard. Just prior to the boat leaving the water, we had a chance to get on board and peek around and see what's ahead of us. Then right at 12:30 pm the travel lift pulled her up and out. We sprayed her bottom off, and then she was moved to her new home for the next several weeks. We got to work at about 1:30 surveying the boat, outside and in to see how to best approach the wrecking out of the the old transom, and to see if there are any other places of the boat that may need attention.

And as with any old wooden boat, there were plenty of those problem places. The scope of work just may change in a few days depending on the condition of wood around, under and just forward of the transom. So, since it's late and I'm tired. I'm only going to post one picture tonight. Hopefully tomorrow I'll be able to update with more photos.

(FYI- I did photoshop this photo, but only to remove the boats name from the transom, and I chopped my poor friends head off as well)
Are you able to provide us wit more info on her? Is she an Adkin. year built, etc? (My special shade of green from the envy must be showing through about now…)
 

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Here's a look at the project

The boat hauled out today and is now on the hard. Just prior to the boat leaving the water, we had a chance to get on board and peek around and see what's ahead of us. Then right at 12:30 pm the travel lift pulled her up and out. We sprayed her bottom off, and then she was moved to her new home for the next several weeks. We got to work at about 1:30 surveying the boat, outside and in to see how to best approach the wrecking out of the the old transom, and to see if there are any other places of the boat that may need attention.

And as with any old wooden boat, there were plenty of those problem places. The scope of work just may change in a few days depending on the condition of wood around, under and just forward of the transom. So, since it's late and I'm tired. I'm only going to post one picture tonight. Hopefully tomorrow I'll be able to update with more photos.

(FYI- I did photoshop this photo, but only to remove the boats name from the transom, and I chopped my poor friends head off as well)
I can see the individual boards on the transom. So now I can visualize what you are going to do,
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Here's a look at the project

The boat hauled out today and is now on the hard. Just prior to the boat leaving the water, we had a chance to get on board and peek around and see what's ahead of us. Then right at 12:30 pm the travel lift pulled her up and out. We sprayed her bottom off, and then she was moved to her new home for the next several weeks. We got to work at about 1:30 surveying the boat, outside and in to see how to best approach the wrecking out of the the old transom, and to see if there are any other places of the boat that may need attention.

And as with any old wooden boat, there were plenty of those problem places. The scope of work just may change in a few days depending on the condition of wood around, under and just forward of the transom. So, since it's late and I'm tired. I'm only going to post one picture tonight. Hopefully tomorrow I'll be able to update with more photos.

(FYI- I did photoshop this photo, but only to remove the boats name from the transom, and I chopped my poor friends head off as well)
Vessel info:

year built - 1931, California
Length - 56'
beam - unsure at this point
type- topsail schooner
Mainmast - 75+ feet, foremast approx 60 feet?
At this point, I'm unsure of her planking and frames. But I will find this out.
 

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Here's a look at the project

The boat hauled out today and is now on the hard. Just prior to the boat leaving the water, we had a chance to get on board and peek around and see what's ahead of us. Then right at 12:30 pm the travel lift pulled her up and out. We sprayed her bottom off, and then she was moved to her new home for the next several weeks. We got to work at about 1:30 surveying the boat, outside and in to see how to best approach the wrecking out of the the old transom, and to see if there are any other places of the boat that may need attention.

And as with any old wooden boat, there were plenty of those problem places. The scope of work just may change in a few days depending on the condition of wood around, under and just forward of the transom. So, since it's late and I'm tired. I'm only going to post one picture tonight. Hopefully tomorrow I'll be able to update with more photos.

(FYI- I did photoshop this photo, but only to remove the boats name from the transom, and I chopped my poor friends head off as well)
Awesome! I can't wait to see how this turns out….
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Hauling out - the fun begins

So, it's been a few days since my last post on this project, and what a wild few days it has been. The boat was hauled out and set up on blocking in the boat yard, where she'll be for the next 30 days or so. We've finished all of the glue-ups for the transom, and have been hard at work wrecking out the transom and other parts of the boat. Once we removed the transom and had a look down below, we found a few other significant areas that needed to be addressed on this boat.

Here she is, out of the water and ready to be sprayed down.


That's a big boat!


The scaffolding goes up.


I'll try to get more pictures up tomorrow because as it stands now, the boat has no transom, several bottom planks have been pulled, and the decking has been pulled up out of the cockpit to allow access to the horn timber. In our crawling around inside the boat we discovered that there was a large section of wood that was completely deteriorated where the rudder shaft enters the horn timber inside the boat. Upon further inspection and some careful removal of wood, we've discovered an old repair on the horn timber that is going to be repaired again.
It's proving to be a once in a lifetime project!
 

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Hauling out - the fun begins

So, it's been a few days since my last post on this project, and what a wild few days it has been. The boat was hauled out and set up on blocking in the boat yard, where she'll be for the next 30 days or so. We've finished all of the glue-ups for the transom, and have been hard at work wrecking out the transom and other parts of the boat. Once we removed the transom and had a look down below, we found a few other significant areas that needed to be addressed on this boat.

Here she is, out of the water and ready to be sprayed down.


That's a big boat!


The scaffolding goes up.


I'll try to get more pictures up tomorrow because as it stands now, the boat has no transom, several bottom planks have been pulled, and the decking has been pulled up out of the cockpit to allow access to the horn timber. In our crawling around inside the boat we discovered that there was a large section of wood that was completely deteriorated where the rudder shaft enters the horn timber inside the boat. Upon further inspection and some careful removal of wood, we've discovered an old repair on the horn timber that is going to be repaired again.
It's proving to be a once in a lifetime project!
That's quite a canoe. I'll be following your progress.
 

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Hauling out - the fun begins

So, it's been a few days since my last post on this project, and what a wild few days it has been. The boat was hauled out and set up on blocking in the boat yard, where she'll be for the next 30 days or so. We've finished all of the glue-ups for the transom, and have been hard at work wrecking out the transom and other parts of the boat. Once we removed the transom and had a look down below, we found a few other significant areas that needed to be addressed on this boat.

Here she is, out of the water and ready to be sprayed down.


That's a big boat!


The scaffolding goes up.


I'll try to get more pictures up tomorrow because as it stands now, the boat has no transom, several bottom planks have been pulled, and the decking has been pulled up out of the cockpit to allow access to the horn timber. In our crawling around inside the boat we discovered that there was a large section of wood that was completely deteriorated where the rudder shaft enters the horn timber inside the boat. Upon further inspection and some careful removal of wood, we've discovered an old repair on the horn timber that is going to be repaired again.
It's proving to be a once in a lifetime project!
Very interesting project…..

Watching this one for sure.
 
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