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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited by Moderator)
3d printing

I had a request to write a blog post about 3d printing. I will cover both resin and fdm printing and show some examples of what I do with it and maybe how it can be used in the shop. First thing to remember qith 3d printing is you will have to tinker with it and experiment to get the best print and you will have to fix certain issues as they crop up. Here is my 3d printer setup.
These are my fdm printers a prusa mini plus and an ender 3pro.
Table Computer desk Automotive design Luggage and bags Desk

This is my resin printer a creality halot one and the creality wash cure station.
Gadget Audio equipment Home appliance Gas Display device


Shelving Table Shelf Plastic Computer hardware


The fdm printers and wash cure station live in the front corner of my living room by the tv and the resin printer lives in the garage which is my shop. The fumes from the resin printer bother my wife.
FDM printing takes plastic 1.75mm thick that comes on rolls about 1kg but you can get different size rolls. The nozzle heats up to about 210C and the bed heats up to about 60C. These temps depend on what material you are using. There are different kinds of filament for different applications. I mainly use PLA. Depending on how strong you need a part to be will determine what filament you use and also how many walls you have and how much infill. If you have overhangs you need supports. With fdm printing the more objects you have on the bed the longer the print takes. Some of my prints take days. You can adjust the speed and other settings to suit your needs. FDM prints can be sanded smooth and also be printed in pieces and glued together. I have also heard of people using filler and sanding to smooth out layer lines. It can be painted as well. You can get filament in all variety of colors even to look like wood. You use a cad program like fusion 360 to create your designs. Of course there are several different programs you can use. Once designed you create an stl file. If you are like me and you dont have a lot of experience in cad you can get stl files free from places like thingiverse and other places. There are also a bunch of patreons you can join or files you can buy off etsy or cults 3d just to name a couple. Then you load that file into your slicer of choice. My preferred slicer is prusa slicer but if i need tree supports then i use cura. These slicers are free although there are a couple you have to pay for. In the slicer you position your object on the bed. If you want multiple objects and they will fit then you can do multiple objects of the same or different. In the slicer you set your temps, speeds, supports and other settings. When you slice it gives you the amount of filament usedand how long the print will take. Then you put that gcode file on a usb or sd card or send it to your rasberry pi running octoprint and start your print. I watch mine for the first few layers and when I am around will check on it to make sure it is still printing properly. You have a y, x, and z axis that move to place the filament on the bed. The bed is heated so the filament sticks to it. The extruder pushes thebfilament through the hot nozzle at the places needed and once the filament goes through the nozzle it has a fan to cool and harden it.

Resin printing uses resin instead of plastic filament. The resin is uv cured. On a resin printer you only have a z axis that moves up and down. The z axis carries the build plate which you periodically have to level. The build plate is what your resin sticks to. That is determined by uv exposyre time. Too much and it is hard to get off the plate to the point of vreaking the print. Too little and the print stays in the vat and the print fails. Z axis lowers the build plate into a vat of resin. Once stipped the gcode determines which parts of the the screen that is under the vat is lit up to cure that portion of resin. Then the z axis lifts the build plate a certain amount set by you and lowers it again for the next layer. Most of the time you will want to use a raft with supports to lift your modle off the build plate but not always. Also orientation is key here as well as supports. Put more on than you think you need. If you have it oriented wrong or not enough or wrong size supports as the model becomes heavier it will come off the build plate and stick to the fep in the bottom of the vat(dont ask me how i know this). Like fdm you can get different colors for you resin as well as different resins for stronger prints. Unlike fdm you can add additives to make the resin stronger as resin is fairly brittle. You can also add dye to resin to color it. You can hollow your prints to use less resin and make them lighter. After the print is complete they need the excess resin washed off in isopropyl alcohol or water depending on the resin. Then you use a uv light to finish curing then you can paint it.

You can get some fairly decent detail out of fdm printing but if you want to print miniatures or extremely detailed pieces then resin is the way to go.

I originally got into 3d printing to print oen blank molds and that has expanded to me printing a bunch of other stuff.

Here are a couple of things that I have printed.

Resin baby groot washed ready for aupport removal and curing.
Blue Azure Gesture Art Creative arts


Resin babygroot that I painted.
Hair Head Toy Wood Art


Triangle Automotive lighting Wood Font Rectangle


These 2 prints are straight off the fdm printer no paint or sanding.
Head Insect Wood Mythical creature Creative arts


Food Tableware Petal Pink Party supply


Examples of pen blank molds off fdm printer

Rectangle Wood Shelf Orange Wood stain


Wood Shelf Rectangle Box Hardwood


I cast resin in the molds and then turn that into a pen here are a couple of examples.

Wood Glove Wood stain Sock Hardwood


Wood Chair Electric blue Hardwood Fashion accessory


The green in this is the 3d print
Table Wood Toy Carmine Desk

Also a screwdriver handle cast and resulting screwdriver. Used 2 different colors for the 3d print.
Wood Triangle Rectangle Automotive lighting Font


Triangle Gas Tints and shades Art Paint


Triangle Automotive lighting Wood Font Rectangle

An example for shop use might be a bow tie to keep a crack from spreading. Not exactly sure how well that would work but I am sure it would. You make your bowtie in the slab then take tour measurments and designe it to fit those measurements precisely. Can also be used for inlay if you are good with cad.

I can see 3d printing being used in the shop in several ways. It can be used for segmenting pen blanks…the celtic knot portion or other segmenting.

Sorry for such a long post. Hope this helps those who are interested in it.

Sorry for the formatting errors I am doing this on my phone and it seems something went wrong but it all looks to be there.
 

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Thanks, Keebs. I'll have to re-read this a few times to digest it, but it looks very thorough. Maybe eventually I'll know enough to know what I don't know :)
 

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Nice Keeb!

I don't do printing, but I know how valuable this kind of info is and a great reference for future needs.

Seems as we collect tools, our "comfort zone" expands. I don't think it ever shrinks.

I'm just now getting into some laser work (mainly for the wife glass work) and digging through the knowledge base here has helped immensely.
 

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Ortur LM3 with the 10W blue laser.

I ll write a review soon, just got it online last weekend and trying various things out now.

Overall it s nice, but there are some complaints 8^)

- splintergroup
I'll be keeping an eye out for that.
 

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Keebler1 - I use an Ender 3 v2. Like you I use it for a lot of woodworking applications. I made a bunch of accessories and tool holders for my Festool MFT, everything from specialized bench dogs and squares to tool holders that slide into the rails. I also made a bunch of accessories for both my Festool and DeWalt track saws and tracks. I even made some things for my Domino. I have printed battery holders, cordless tool holders, track holders, and tool holders that fit into the label slots in the old style systainers. I also use it to print parts, handles, knobs, spacers, shims, etc. I printed mounts for my Ring camera's, parts for my boat, and even parts for my truck. I print with PLA+ and PETG.

I also have and Ender 3 Pro but it's still in the box. I bought it over a year ago on one of Micro Centers sales for $99 but haven't found the time to put it together.

I have an Ortur LM2 laser. I use it in the winter out in my shop when it cools down.

In another post I saw that you were in Sherman earlier today. Were you picking up aluminum, chicken, or Q-tips? Do you live in the area? I go through Sherman once or twice a week. I live 30 minutes south of there since I have a boat up at Texoma.
 

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Keebs, great write up, plenty of info I didn't know.

I hope to just send this text, it looks like all the responses so far have quoted you, pics and all. Wondering if that's the norm? If so Cricket better stock up on hard drives. :sneaky:
 
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