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Found this:

I've got a finished garage and I will likely be moving in a few years, so I don't want to cut into the sheetrock near the panel to get a dedicated 220v outlet installed.

What this guy came up with in the video seems to fit the bill perfectly (the need for occasional 220v), but before proceeding, I wanted a little feedback from others.

Thanks!
 

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I didn't watch the video (other than the first 10 seconds) but it's easy to envision what he did. What is the real question? It will work, along as the 2 120V legs are on opposite sides of the panel. Is it safe? Well, a 240V breaker trips both legs when 1 is short; if you use 2 120V circuits you won't have that circumstance, so one leg will still be hot if some problem occurs. My opinion: tearing into sheet rock isn't that big a deal (if that's the only deterrent),
 

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What Fred said… 220v is just two individual 110v circuits on different legs in the panel. Kind of depends on where you want the outlet though. I put a dedicated 50A outlet next to the panel (which is in my garage) for my welder. All that was required was cutting the hole for the outlet box and then fishing the wire over to the panel a couple of feet away. No patching or other 'repairs' needed after installing. Alternatively, if you have an electric clothes dryer nearby, you can use it.. typically they are [email protected]

Cheers,
Brad
 

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Well, it will work. But it's a code violation about 10 times over and not very safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Fred, Brad, all…

It didn't take much convincing to talk me out of it - that's why I posted it here.
I give electrical as much respect as I do tablesaws, routers, jointers, etc…
I just pulled my panel off and took a couple of photos. It looks like I have just enough room for 1 220v breaker.
This panel is a sub panel, my main panel with all the other 220v breakers is on the outside of the house.

Building Electricity Wood Gas Engineering


Wood Automotive tire Rectangle Font Gas
 

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There is a little more to it than just ANY 120 V circuits.

The two circuits MUST BE 180 DEGREES OUT OF PHASE WITH EACH OTHER. This can be illustrated using two sine curves super composed, one on top of the other. I could easily illustrate the idea to you graphically, but its is difficult to do in in words.
 

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Jeez man its a little sheet rock. It will cost you 20 bucks in materials to open an acess and patch it back in. Your gagging at a nat and swallowing a camel.

Do it safe and do it to code.
 

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As others have pointed out, with the actual 220 breaker, you'll trip both legs at the same time. That's not possible using two separate 110's and is just asking for trouble.

One thing I hate doing more than just about anything else in the world is drywall repair. It sure beats the hell out of fire damage that your insurance company won't cover from doing something like this. Glad it sounds like you've decided against this.
 
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