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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Everyone, first time poster and only have a couple of years of woodworking under my belt. I am hoping someone can give me some insight on the problem I currently have. I recently upgraded and reconfigured my stock Harbor Freight dust collector to a 2 stage unit.

First, I replaced the impeller that came with the unit to a WEN 12"one and I replaced the dust bag with a filter canister.
Second, I reconfigured the unit to a 2 stage dust collector unit and added a Super Dust Deputy.

The problem I have is when the dust comes in the Dust Deputy, it doesn't drop into the garbage bin but continues on to the overflow bucket. I have checked the Deputy inflow hose and the hose going from the bottom of the deputy to the garbage bin. There isn't any clogs. I have removed the garbage bin and the overflow bucket and started the unit. There is a suction coming from the hose connecting the Deputy to the garbage bin and there is a large amount of air coming from coming unit holding the filter canister where overflow bucket and the shelf meet.

I have attached a pic of the setup. Please overlook the excess tinfoil tape and 2×4 brace.
Gas Electrical wiring Wood Machine Plumbing valve


If you look on the floor under the blue overflow bucket you will a large amount of Walnut shaving from the planar that come from the spewing out of a hole between the platform and the lid of bucket.

Any help or insights would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Most likely you have air leaks on your larger can. If air can get in it will create uplift that will prevent the chips from falling. You can't test the unit with the hose off, it will create a path of least resistance and the unit will pull air in from that location. To test you can use smoke around the lid of the can while everything is supposedly sealed up. Or if you want to get fancy a vac gauge.

It might also work better if your cyclone was attached directly to the lid of the larger can and the hose was between the top of the cyclone and the impeller.

I bought a 55 gallon drum with a cam lock removable lid. The lid seals really well and it is a more solid platform to attach the cyclone. You can find those drums for about $20 from junk dealers. They are often used for food grade shipping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the replies. The lid for the Brute is 2 pieces of 3/4 ply. The bottom piece has been cut to fit the open of the can. The top piece has been screwed to the bottom and been lined with a gasket to seal the opening. when the unit is running you can see where the side of the Brute has been sucked in slightly.

To address you statement "It might also work better if your cyclone was attached directly to the lid of the larger can and the hose was between the top of the cyclone and the impeller." Do you think a foot of hose would be enough or more then a ft?
 

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FWIW, attached is how I modified my HF DC. Very similar to yours except the Dust Deputy mounting flange and my exhaust goes through the canister filter before dropping in the bucket. My plywood sits atop the trash barrel without any clamping and has a groove milled that fits the rim with foam insulation for a seal. I did not modify the stock impeller. Big qualitative (I didn't measure) improvement in flow over stock HF.
 

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On the topic of dust bin connection:
You want the path from cyclone to the bin to be vertical drop. The impeller is pulling air upward. It is only when dust is spinning a spiral downward into bin, that it drops properly. You want the length of connection tube to be short and straight down (not curved away from wall). Suggest you need a smaller/narrower collection drum, and/or cyclone mounted out further from wall.

Beyond the possible dust bin configuration issue; there is one or more problems with inlet plumbing preventing proper separation.

- A cyclone requires a minimum of 4 diameters of smooth wall straight pipe in front the cyclone entrance. This gives the flow of dust distance/time to line up and reach maximum velocity. Dust requires this velocity to follow the cyclone walls downward. If the flow is not co-linear with pipe, the dust bounces everywhere as it hits the initial cyclone side wall. A random inlet flow can actually push debris vertical towards center and into your suction tube.

- The pressure loss from extended length of flexible hose to your machines can/will reduce the dust speed in duct. You always want to minimize the use of flex hose. Without seeing the total length of inlet hose, can only assume the worst, and suggest entire inlet needs to be replace with smooth wall duct.
FWIW - 1ft of flex hose has almost same pressure loss as 7-10ft of smooth wall pipe.

Bottom line: Flex pipe BAD… :)

Best Luck.
 

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If your seal is good the easiest place to start is as others have said is to flip the placement of your cyclone and hose. Put the cyclone directly on the plywood on the trash can and run the flex up to your impeller housing. Smooth wall hardline would be best but for testing the flex will work.
 
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