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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I'm new here.

We are retired and moved from Oregon to South Dakota a couple years back. I've been busy caring for our home and property and just got cement poured in the shop. It needs insulation, inside walls and the electric part of the floor heat completed. I enjoy woodworking and hope to spend more time doing it. I had a good woodworking class in grade school many years ago, and for a few years before retirement I bought broken acoustic stringed instruments, mostly guitars, and repaired them. I'm far from being a luthier and have a long ways to go to become good at finishing but I was able to make them usable. It was a good way to pass time and I sold them for about what I had in them for the repairs.

I recently bought a late 40's Shopmaster band saw and this Jet table saw. Some Jet parts were in boxes. I got a new belt, blades, dust collection rubber fittings to attach a shop vac, added wheels, cleaned it up, and removed rust from the table. I see it doesn't have a blade guard, splitter or anti-kick pawls. Blade lock knob in center of blade height wheel doesn't work but I got the old blade off. Only other table saw I've had was an old Craftsman that didn't have a guard or splitter. I didn't have problems, but may have only used it a couple dozen times. I think I'd be best to have these safety items with this saw. I see recommendations for getting a Shark Guard but it looks like one would cost about what I paid for the saw. I found a universal blade guard for $30 and see some people make a zero clearance insert and install a microjig splitter in it. I also notice dust collection on the Shark Guard and many blade guards is from the top where this Jet looks like it was done from the bottom. I'm at a loss as to what I should do and would appreciate advice.
 

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I'll share my experience with you, but in no way am I suggesting that you do what I do. You must be comfortable with what ever you are using.
I bought my first table saw new 10-15 years ago. It came with a blade guard. The first time I used it, the work piece got jammed in the blade guard mechanism. After clearing the jam, I carefully tried again and noticed first that I could not see the cut clearly, second the mechanism was not very robust or reliable, and third it got in the way of the push stick I was using. I removed it and have never put it back on. Nor have I replaced it with "something better". I prefer being able to clearly see what is going on. Also, I like using the type of push stick that also holds the work piece down (is it called a push shoe?). These can, at times, interfere with blade guards.
I have made a zci as they will minimize the amount of sawdust on top of the saw and they help with cleaner cuts. I also use a splitter whenever I'm making through cuts. My saw does not have a riving knife that moves up and down with the blade. So, it needs to be removed when making non-through cuts.
Bottom line: I insist on being able to see the blade. I am just not comfortable when I can't.
Dust collection: I have never had top dust collection. Sure I sometimes get quite a lot of sawdust on the table top. I just sweep it off and move on.
 

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Again, you gotta do what feels right, feels safe for you. I see YT's all the time about using (or not) blade guards, but I use mine. BTW I had that jet saw, its a great contractor saw. I upgraded to a mid 70's used Unisaw with 3.5Hp motor, its better but outside of lack of power the Jet was good too, but it certianly created a lot more dust than my Unisaw, but there are "how to's" for sealing up the Jet table saw to minimize dust - lots of hardboard and duct tape.

You don't say, but you must have contacted Jet right? They are still around, and they do sell parts. However, I would either go for the Shark guard if your'e going to do max dust collection - however Shark guard forces an over the table dust port. Or go for the original Jet part. My Jet guard worked fine, could see thru it, had pawls,etc...Sometimes on Ebay you will see people who don't use the guard, sell it. Or they will "part out" a whole table saw.

I would heartily recommend putting in a splitter too. Kickback for me has not been a problem, and I attribute that to the splitter. I've cut many pieces of wood that closed in after the cut, that the splitter stopped from becoming an kickback/accident.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Again, you gotta do what feels right, feels safe for you. I see YT's all the time about using (or not) blade guards, but I use mine. BTW I had that jet saw, its a great contractor saw. I upgraded to a mid 70's used Unisaw with 3.5Hp motor, its better but outside of lack of power the Jet was good too, but it certianly created a lot more dust than my Unisaw, but there are "how to's" for sealing up the Jet table saw to minimize dust - lots of hardboard and duct tape.

You don't say, but you must have contacted Jet right? They are still around, and they do sell parts. However, I would either go for the Shark guard if your'e going to do max dust collection - however Shark guard forces an over the table dust port. Or go for the original Jet part. My Jet guard worked fine, could see thru it, had pawls,etc...Sometimes on Ebay you will see people who don't use the guard, sell it. Or they will "part out" a whole table saw.

I would heartily recommend putting in a splitter too. Kickback for me has not been a problem, and I attribute that to the splitter. I've cut many pieces of wood that closed in after the cut, that the splitter stopped from becoming an kickback/accident.
Thanks, I went on the Jet sight and asked if their blade guard assembly would work on my saw, a couple weeks back, but haven't gotten a reply. They picture a few saws but stock numbers are different than mine. I'll keep looking for a used Jet assembly and if I don't find one go for the Shark guard.
 

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I have the same saw I believe, not sure on the year. I found a guard on ereplacementparts.com. It is not the best, but it works, and it also acts as a splitter. The only thing I dont like about the saw is, I have never found a good option for a zero clearance plate. It is too thin, I need to try and make one.
 

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On older saws like that Jet, the splitter, guard and kick-back pawls were all one assembly. Most people despised the guard (and hassle to install/remove) and simply removed, and then lost or misplaced them - which is why you rarely see saws sold on the used market that still have one. The splitter is useful though, and you can cut down the OEM assembly so just the splitter and kick-back pawls are installed without the guard (see picture - cut on red line).
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You can also make your own splitter if you have any metal working ability. It's a very simple design, and old used saw blades work great for making them.

Cheers,
Brad
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have the same saw I believe, not sure on the year. I found a guard on ereplacementparts.com. It is not the best, but it works, and it also acts as a splitter. The only thing I dont like about the saw is, I have never found a good option for a zero clearance plate. It is too thin, I need to try and make one.
Thanks for the information. I see a guy on ebay has a zero clearance plate that's supposed to fit for $42.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
On older saws like that Jet, the splitter, guard and kick-back pawls were all one assembly. Most people despised the guard (and hassle to install/remove) and simply removed, and then lost or misplaced them - which is why you rarely see saws sold on the used market that still have one. The splitter is useful though, and you can cut down the OEM assembly so just the splitter and kick-back pawls are installed without the guard (see picture - cut on red line).
View attachment 3866347
You can also make your own splitter if you have any metal working ability. It's a very simple design, and old used saw blades work great for making them.

Cheers,
Brad
Thanks, much appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'll share my experience with you, but in no way am I suggesting that you do what I do. You must be comfortable with what ever you are using.
I bought my first table saw new 10-15 years ago. It came with a blade guard. The first time I used it, the work piece got jammed in the blade guard mechanism. After clearing the jam, I carefully tried again and noticed first that I could not see the cut clearly, second the mechanism was not very robust or reliable, and third it got in the way of the push stick I was using. I removed it and have never put it back on. Nor have I replaced it with "something better". I prefer being able to clearly see what is going on. Also, I like using the type of push stick that also holds the work piece down (is it called a push shoe?). These can, at times, interfere with blade guards.
I have made a zci as they will minimize the amount of sawdust on top of the saw and they help with cleaner cuts. I also use a splitter whenever I'm making through cuts. My saw does not have a riving knife that moves up and down with the blade. So, it needs to be removed when making non-through cuts.
Bottom line: I insist on being able to see the blade. I am just not comfortable when I can't.
Dust collection: I have never had top dust collection. Sure I sometimes get quite a lot of sawdust on the table top. I just sweep it off and move on.
Thanks, I'm now leaning towards a zci with a splitter myself at least that's what I think I'll start with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
On older saws like that Jet, the splitter, guard and kick-back pawls were all one assembly. Most people despised the guard (and hassle to install/remove) and simply removed, and then lost or misplaced them - which is why you rarely see saws sold on the used market that still have one. The splitter is useful though, and you can cut down the OEM assembly so just the splitter and kick-back pawls are installed without the guard (see picture - cut on red line).
View attachment 3866347
You can also make your own splitter if you have any metal working ability. It's a very simple design, and old used saw blades work great for making them.

Cheers,
Brad
Thanks, that looks like a good idea
 

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I have the same saw. I just made one from one of those thin shelf brackets. I don't use the factory guard, splitter, pawl assembly -- but I do think a splitter is needed. Very easy to make your own ZC throat plate if you have a router table and a flush-trim bit. I put a little flat head nail at the back of the throat plate (on the edge so that it catches on the tiny overhang near the splitter) so that it can't lift up out of the recess in the table.

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