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Mini-Roubo from Oz #4: My first workbench build- recycling offcuts for inlay

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Blog entry by siggykc posted 07-31-2019 12:00 PM 782 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: My first workbench build: Leg Vise - The beginnings Part 4 of Mini-Roubo from Oz series no next part

Gday-gday,

I hope its warm and sunny for you all – a start contrast to the cold wet mornings in Melbourne as of recent!

Due to the weather one evening after work, I was stuck at home with my small garage that is setup for some small metalworking jobs. Bored, I racked my brain for things to do.

As you readers of this blog will know, the last thing I posted on was the leg vise, which is made predominantly out of quilted (big leaf?) maple.
The bloke that sold me that quilted maple shelf/board, gave me a shoe-box worth of small uneven offcuts he had left over.

In the box were small cracked pieces and wedges of Macassar ebony and fiddleback Aussie Blackwood.
Well, since my mother’s family is from the area where they harvest Macassar Ebony (Toraja) and since my dad built the pantry that was the center of the family home out of Aussie Blackwood, I had to incorporate these into the workbench!
But how?
Answer: As an inlay, into the front of the benchtop.

But what of?
Answer: after some pondering over a nice warm cup of tea, I landed on the Schreinerwappen – the symbol for joiners in Germany, as a nod to my father’s roots. And after 20 minutes of rough sketching I came up with this.

I’ll do my best to walk you through how i did it.

Firstly the pieces were really random, being wedge shaped. I needed to get them into workable flat pieces 4mm thick. Resawing was the only way, but as I don’t have a bandsaw, or scrollsaw…..i had to use my dovetail saw.
This was painstakingly slow work, but on the positive side, i got used to cutting accurately! I just kept rotating my work pieces in the vise carefully sawing.

...veeery carefully resawing…

The dovetail saw leaves an awesomely narrow kerf!

To get them as smooth as possible, I had a scrap of maple that I use as a sanding block. I used double sided tape to affix the resawn timber to the bottom of this maple and then ran it over some 180 grit paper that I had clamped to the metal workbench.

The finished resawn piece of ebony after being run over some sand paper

I had to re-hydrate with a nice cuppa, and then I returned to cut the pieces out using my fretsaw. And after some final touch ups with some small engineer’s files. All the flat sized were very carefully planed using a block-plane,

(Getting there!)

I used some tiny pieces of tape to assemble it all on a piece of Huon Pine for contrast. I didn’t cut the Huon pine with the dovetail saw, it was a re-sawn piece my dad gave me earlier in the week!

I was mighty pleased with the result, especially considering the lack of setup that I have, using the basic tools.
But it goes to show what can be done with a little patience. So if you don’t have the powertool setup, don’t be alarmed!
The total height is 85mm and width is 85mm.

I know, I know….this is absolutely not necessary for a workbench – especially as my first workbench.
But, this workbench is more so a skill building exercise.

Do stay tuned for further updates (that is, if i havn’t bored you!).
And I very very very much welcome your feedback or ideas!!!

Cheers!
Siggy

-- Siggy, https://www.instagram.com/siggykc/



4 comments so far

View EarlS's profile (online now)

EarlS

2987 posts in 2803 days


#1 posted 07-31-2019 05:16 PM

Well of course you need details like this on a hand built roubo style workbench. Nice subtle touch to demonstrate your skills and it looks great.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View siggykc's profile

siggykc

9 posts in 34 days


#2 posted 07-31-2019 10:51 PM



Well of course you need details like this on a hand built roubo style workbench. Nice subtle touch to demonstrate your skills and it looks great.

- EarlS

Hey EarlS, thanks for the encouragement! I’m hoping it looks as good on the bench as it does on the piece of huon pine. I hope you get some enjoyment from reading my blog.

Cheers,
Siggy

-- Siggy, https://www.instagram.com/siggykc/

View rhybeka's profile

rhybeka

4672 posts in 3576 days


#3 posted 08-01-2019 04:10 PM

awesome work, Sig! are you going to inlay it into the vise or the bench itself??

-- Beka/Becky - aspiring jill of all trades, still learning to not read the directions.

View siggykc's profile

siggykc

9 posts in 34 days


#4 posted 08-01-2019 11:11 PM



awesome work, Sig! are you going to inlay it into the vise or the bench itself??

- rhybeka

Hey Beka!

Thanks so much for the kind words!
This will be inlaid into a shield shaped insert (kind of like a coat of arms) directly into the front side of the benchtop.
The top is 115mm thick, so I’m hoping there is enough meat there to fit the 85mm square schreinerwappen :)

Siggy

-- Siggy, https://www.instagram.com/siggykc/

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