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Tool-making bug is itching me. Earlier I said that I needed router plane for my workbench build, but what the hell, I just wanted to own one. Honesty is the best policy :)
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Here is my starting point: cutter with threaded rod and milled facets:


Since I had no "real" cutters available here for any reasonable money, I needed to make one from scratch. On one hand I didn't like usual option - L-shaped hex wrench, and on the other hand I wanted some adjustment facilities, so I came up with this solution: to weld tip of the chisel to the threaded rod (10mm diameter). The idea was to minimize number of parts involved into design, and since I had to make the cutters anyway I decided to give it a try. This was the most expensive part of the project: 6 chisels (4mm, 5mm, 6mm, 8mm, 12mm, and 16mm), plus metal turning, milling, and welding work (that I had to outsource) took me about $80. I don't know how chisel tips were welded, I just asked guy who did it for me to try not to overheat cutting edges. Will see how my cutters gonna hold the edge. Also I spent quite a bit time truing up cutters geometry, but thanks to DMT stones it wasn't too bad.

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Having cutters ready I made a bolt that holds the cutter:









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The adjustment nut had to be re-shaped slightly, so I employed my poor-boy lathe, this time cutting brass with sharpened tip of the file:

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Next I made a prototype out of pine:






The prototype was very right thing to do, it let me to test all my not-so-good ideas before I found something that would work for me.
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Next was plane body (beech).




(Main hole drilled with the help of sacrificial piece of wood. The drilling is still my weak spot, I guess I need a drill press.)


(Templates like this one was another right thing to do.)

Ready for shaping:


And here the shaping starts:








Checking shape against the template.




Here's my favorite one: prototype is being used as a tool to build a tool it's been prototyped for:




Sanding.






Two brothers:

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Brass work.

Brass stripes glued into cutter-mounting hole to protect wood from wearing:


Back side of adjusting nut cover plates and back washer:

You can see that I had to hammer brass parts to adjust their shape for better fit. Turned out that metall allows for some errors as well as the wood.



Bolts' heads re-shaped from hex to round:

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Handles.

Handles turned on my poor-boy lathe from some unidentified wood from my mom's garden.




One ready and one more to go:


Final shape of the handles: more smooth curves to match plane's body:


Reaming handles with some ugly bit made from bolt:



Despite its ugliness it provided perfect recess for the head.

Drilling holes for the handles.


Here's how I made little recesses for the handles: I glued sandpaper at the bottom of the handle, screwed it in place and kept rotating it until it cut its way down in the plane's body. Then removed the sandpaper.





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All parts in place, ready for finish:


After two coats of danish oil:

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And finally some tool porn for the brave who survived such long post :)









Plane in action:



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Couple of words about how adjustment works. It works great! I think adjustment machinery is quite clear: you turn adjustment nut which is locked in place with cover plates, the adjustment nut pushes/pulls the cutter up or down. The threads on the rod/nut is 1mm step, so one full turn of the adjustment nut gives 1mm (a little more than 1/32") of cutter move. So if I need to go 0.25mm down I do 1/4 turn and so on. Cool! And this little dot on the adjustment nut helps me to track cutter move:

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Thanks for stepping by, being a happy owner of the router plane now I'll be happy to answer any questions about one :)

Gallery

Comments

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1 Posts
Wow! that is so flash. Brass inlay too. Does it work? I would love to have a gadget for cutting grooves but this might be beyond me.
 

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379 Posts
Slap, thank you! It does work! Hell yes! Now I'm counting each and every little scratch on plane's sole after each pass :)
 

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18,689 Posts
sweet!! I love the poor boys lathe.
 

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379 Posts
Don, thank you, I realize I use my "lathe" more and more often, so I start thinking about some scaffold to ease mounting it on the benchtop.
 

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264 Posts
That is really cool, thanks for sharing
 

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379 Posts
Hoss, thank you. Hope long post won't scare visitors off.
 

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995 Posts
Very nice Yuri. That is on my build list soon and I am going to honor you by using some of your details, but I think I'll but some cutters. Thanks for posting.
Jim
 

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841 Posts
Outstanding project and very nice write up with great pictures. Thanks for sharing.
 

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3,594 Posts
Masterfully done Yuri! Favorited. Great post.

So now you have everything to finish the bench. Right?
 

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7,454 Posts
Outstanding build Yuri! I see a a Daily Top 3 award in your future.

Thanks for a great pictorial and you were wise to build a prototype

first. Gotta keep that in mind.
 

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3,876 Posts
Very Nice Work Indeed! Thanks For Posting!

Rick
 

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12,439 Posts
Yuri, have you noticed CL810 has been strutting a bit lately ? Must be close with that bench thing of his :0)
That is a masterful tool you've created. Well done.
 

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3,604 Posts
Wow Yuri that turned out great, and thanks for all the build details.
 

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565 Posts
Beautiful work! Looks classier than anything someone could buy these days.
 

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I'm embarrassed. I couldn't do this even with all my fancy gear. I love how you use tools you've built to build more (not only the prototype router, but the hollowing plane also). The picture of checking the curve against the template is a thing of beauty.
 

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7,151 Posts
This is a very cool build…..thanks for documenting it and sharing….
 

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982 Posts
Fantastic! Beautiful craftsmanship.
 
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