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Project Information

This 5-tealight candleholder was made from hard maple and walnut.

The strips of wood were crosscut and ripped on the tablesaw before glue-up with Titebond III and 5-clamps. The maple was 5/4 and the walnut was only 4/4, so I ended up cutting a strip of the walnut to set it on edge so as to be as thick as the maple, turning the edge grain to face up.

Measurements are as follows:
Overall length: 10-1/2"
Overall width: 2-11/16"
Overall thickness: 1-1/16"
Each strip of maple is 15/16" wide
The strip of walnut is 13/16" wide
The 45-degree chamfer on the bottom is 3/32" deep
The candle holes are 1-1/2" wide and 9/16" deep

A tealight is about 1-1/2" wide, so I drilled the center of the first hole 1-1/4" in from the side. From the center of each candle hole to the next center is 2". There is exactly 1/2" spacing from the edge of the candleholder until the first candle, and also exactly 1/2" between candle edges.

The holes were drilled on my drill press using a 1-1/2" forstner bit. A tealight candle is about 9/16" tall. I wanted them to be just below flush with the surface of the wood. The forstner bit I used was close 9/16" tall on the sides before it met the shaft, so I basically drilled until the top of the bit was almost flush with the surface of the wood.

I used the belt sander to quickly smooth out a couple of light elevation differences. It was then hand-sanded up through 400-grit paper. I freehanded a 45-degree chamfer 3/32" deep on the bottom to keep the edges from getting dinged, plus to give it a lightly floating effect above whatever surface it sits on. All other edges were given a very slight roundover just to remove the sharpness. nothing major. It has soft rounded edges, rather than sharp edges.

The finish is 3-4 coats (bottom/top) of spray-on Zinsser Bull's Eye Seal Coat dewaxed shellac. It was the first time I used the spray-on shellac. I will definitely use it again and only had a slight run on one end, trying to take care of the end-grain soaking everything up.

I already have other wood combinations and sizes planned for future versions of these. This was an enjoyable and easy project to complete in a short amount of time and made a great gift that travels well for my visiting mother-in-law who packed it in her suitcase and took it back to Michigan today. This would also be a great project to use up smaller pieces of wood.

New techniques, tools, etc. on this project:
I had not yet used my chamfer bit in the router.
I also used the spray-on (dewaxed) shellac for the first time here.

Things I'd do differently:
Lighter coats of shellac so as to avoid build-up/running on the end-grain.
The chamfer is not perfect and I did burn one little spot near a corner trying to get the chamfer right. I continued going slightly deeper several times, but finally decided to stop because I didn't want the chamfered edge any more pronounced than it was.

Gallery

Comments

· Registered
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19,716 Posts
Nice holder and good wood combination
 

· Registered
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125 Posts
Nice job on the tealight holder. Looks good.
 

· Registered
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125 Posts
Nice wood choices and the wood burned signature is a nice touch too.

Paul
 

· Registered
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1,833 Posts
Looking good!
 

· In Loving Memory
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8,391 Posts
Very nice Jonathan.
 
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