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Project Information

This is a case I made for a car model, a 1/8 scale 1909 Fiat race car. The case is made with a walnut base, Lexan plastic, and polished brass fittings plus some plush fabric and mirror Plexiglas for the top of the base beneath the car. I had to make the Lexan viewing cover twice as it was a tight fit. Lots of time put into both car and case, much more than one would expect.

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Awesome case,,, awesome car. I would not surprise me how much time both took….
 

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When something is absolutely correct, either the item on display, or the display it is housed in, it's as good as it can be. It brings to mind the question, who made the car?

Both items are certainly worthy of a closer look.

Thanks for posting.
 

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If the question is "Who made the car", I made the car. - Planeman

And I guess I should say the car and case are sitting on a roll-around stool/low work table I made years ago and is not part of the model and case. One of handiest projects I ever made. I use it constantly.
 

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Nice job.
 

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Super nice work all the way around the project!!!
 

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Love that case planeman.

Further to the "Who made the car", "What is it made of"? Is it a plastic kit?

Back to the case. Incredible how many modelers neglect to cover up their creations, only to have it thrown out (or relegated to a dark area) after years of accumulated dust results in broken parts due to an over zealous cleanliness freak missus's duster (said without malice).

Couple of questions:
  • Glalss or acrylic/perspex sides?
  • Glued or siliconed? What used.
  • More detail on the brass fittings, please.

I am interested as I am currently building a perspex display case for my 55+ year old heirloom... will be posting soon.
Some of the questions are based on my use of CA and perspex and many messes made by spilled CA on the perspex faces (not just the edges). Have found a fix and will be blogging as a future tip.
 

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Nice case - nice car too!
 

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AWESOME

+

AWESOME
 

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To answer the question above . . .

"Couple of questions:

Glalss or acrylic/perspex sides?
Glued or siliconed? What used.
More detail on the brass fittings, please.

The material I used for the case is Lexan, a relatively non-breakable clear plastic akin to Plexiglas (Perspex for you Brits) that is used as replacement for window glass. Lexan, like Plexiglas, can be worked with sharp woodworking tools and is usually cut on a table saw. The thickness I used was 1/16" for a reason, but 1/8" is the usual thickness for these cases. There is a special glue used for Lexan and Plexiglas. You can buy it from the plastic sellers and even big box stores like Home Depot in the window glass section. It is applied using a small squeeze bottle with a hypodermic syringe type needle on the bottle. You will have to make a 90 degree wooden jig to hold the plastic in place while gluing. The glue is applied by VERY carefully dragging the needle tip down the inside of the plastic joint. If you "mess up", it shows and you can't remove it. Bonding is very slow to take place. Allow six hours before CAREFULLY removing the glued pieces from the jig. Allow it to sit until well into the following day for the glued joint to reach maximum strength. Do ONE JOINT at a time! Also, be sure to make all glued edges very smooth, not polished, but smooth. Ragged edges will show.

Glass can be used, but is prone to easy breakage. Generally, plastic is best.

The brass fittings were bought off-the-shelf. The round threaded brass knobs are lamp finials (the brass knobs that hold the shade on the top of the lamp). Lamp sellers and some hardware stores sell these. You can also buy them on the Internet. The brass corners were found on the internet. The 1/8" brass rods are from some 1/8" brass brazing rods I had with my welding supplies. A welding supplier can sell you a few. I just used a die to put some threads on the ends.
 

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Than
To answer the question above . . .
.....
- Planeman40
Thanks for the thorough answer Plaeman'.

Didn't think it was glass, however, had to ask. Wasn't aware that there was a special glue… that's why I use CA, which does work, but makes one helluva mess if you even slightly deviate… and even more if your applier does a premature ejaculation over the face (as opposed to the edges).

Have found a way to clean up the spills… blog forthcoming.
 

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_"Have found a way to clean up the spills… blog forthcoming."

Now This I want to hear!!!
 

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I was a bit of a perspex bin diver bandit when I was younger made quite a few items and use some special glue.
I think I still have it if your interested in knowing what it is
BTW you dont glue prespex edges just run it along the seam and it wicks in!
 

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I was a bit of a perspex bin diver bandit when I was younger made quite a few items and use some special glue.
I think I still have it if your interested in knowing what it is
BTW you dont glue prespex edges just run it along the seam and it wicks in!
 
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