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Project Information

This was over a year ago. We were called in by a tree service to salvage this monster! It had some major rot, and metal issues unfortunatley, but we still have some excellent pieces including the burl as seen in the picture. At the time of cutting it the burl weighed in at around 180 pounds or so. Many more big burls like this in stock, but not with the interesting story!
The tree was documented to have been planted in 1792 by the property owners before Edison, and we have a movie of felling the huge trunk.
Looking carefully at the fourth picture you can see our carefull plunge cut after wedge cutting to core out the tree. This prevents tear out when the tree finally looses it's balance and falls.
www.middlevalleylumber.com

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Comments

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That's pretty cool. You gotta wonder how much of that metal in that tree was put in there by Mr. Edison himself!
 

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No way to tell, but I now I wonder! Still thinking of what to do with the burl!\
Thank you
 

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Interesting tree to fall. What do you mean by wedge cutting the core?

BTW, Welcome to LJ!!
 

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I recently posted this massive BoxElder tree being removed by a local tree company. It was 57" x 58" diameter.
Unfortunately it went to someone to use as firewood : (
http://lumberjocks.com/topics/12230
 

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Very cool!

Thomas Edison had some nice digs! That is a beautiful house.
 

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Maybe the metal in that tree was the wire he had connected to the kite he flew in the thunder storm. LOL
 

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That was Ben Franklin Dan. Edison is the guy that made that talking machine.
 

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TopamazSurvivor,
We did not wedge cut the core, but wedge cut the front in the direction we wanted it to go (also called box cutting), then 90 degrees to that we plunge the saw into the tree and cut out the core. At this point the chain saw bar either pokes out the back, or you have to trace your chainsaw mark around the tree then stab it from the back and connect to the previous cut.
This "hinges" the tree and gives you a space to put a wedge in the back. taking little by little off the "hinge tabs" on either side helps direct it the way you want it to go.
The whole point is to avoid tear out. Ever see a tree stump with wood fiber strands sticking up from the end? It minimizes that, giving you a better log.
 

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Okie dokie, that makes sense. He biggest tree i ever cut was a 120' fir, about 4' 6" at the cut. After I got it started I discovered it was rotten in the center!! :-(( Fortunately, it was even on the edges:))
 

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That's the worst, because then it's really unpredictable which direction it's gona go!!!
 

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Yeah!! I did a lot of praying until it started straight down without twisting or turning:)) The guy I cut it for wanted me to put my winch on it to make sure which way it went. It was so big, my little 3/4 ton Ford 4×4 would have went with it! Another guy wanted to me cut some maples near a power line and a house and use the truck to pull it the right way, but they were 5-6 foot at the stump. No way the pickup would have mattered. I didn't cut those :) Power lines were too close for me to climb and cut:-(
 

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yet another massive tree comes down to become someones thoughts put onto wood…
 
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