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Project Information

This plant stand is based on one of Gustav Stickley's models featured in Robert Lang's book Shop Drawings for Craftsman Furniture. I departed from the Stickley design by rotating the lower stretcher, and making it a bit wider to use as a shelf. Rather than a pegged tenon, the shelf's stub through-tenons are secured with ebony wedges. The original featured Grubey tile; but that being spendy, mine has Mexican Talavera tile which I picked up at an auction. With the exception of the ebony wedges and the plywood tile board and cleats, the piece is constructed entirely of quarter-sawn, white oak and stained with Van Dyke crystals, then finished with linseed oil, then stained with Bartley's Golden Oak gel stain, then finished with 3 coats of 1/2 lb cut shellac, then 3 coats of thinned polyurethane. As Lang suggests, I did the finishing first, then the glue-up, then the tile. The construction is all mortise and tenon, and to avoid interference at the 90 degree joints, the tenons are chamfered along the inside facing edge. The project is simple, though it is a challenge to get all the horizontal parts (with the exception of the shelf) to be exactly the same length between tenon ends. There are 22 mortise-and-tenon joints to make and fit. A bench-top hollow chisel mortising machine is handy. Also, I own a good shoulder plane! The tiles were carefully selected for flatness and size (they are handmade and not at all uniform). They are set with a silicone tile adhesive, then grouted the old fashioned way with a 50:50 mix of sanded and unsanded grout.

Gallery

Comments

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3,381 Posts
Steve, you did an excellent job with the stand and the finish really sets it off. I need to be certain that LOML doesn't see this. haha
 

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190 Posts
By the way, even though there's a bottle of PVA glue in one of the photos, the piece is glued up with hide glue, which I prefer on a piece like this because (a) I can clean it up with a bit of warm water and a tooth brush, and (b) it's reversible, at least in principle.
 

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Very nice work.
 

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That is pretty!! and I love your work bench, and the clutter in the background, like a proper shop!! :)
 

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Wow. Nicely done. I've a client who'd like this but she'd want mesquite in place of oak.
thanks for sharing.
-terry
 
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