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Project Information

I have collected planes for many years. I was never taught how to set up, sharpen, and use a plane. However I was recently able to hook up with Wayne C from LumberJocks, Sacramento area. He started me thinking about those planes laying in my cabinet. I got them out and started preping them to go back to work.

I found the following in my tool cabinets. Stanley/Bailey #5, Stanley Handyman, Stanley #95, Stanley Block plane and a Craftsman. There were a couple of others in my collection that were not restorable.

I started by lapping all planes soles and cutters to 280 grit. I then waxed those soles with carnuba wax. I took the cutters out and gound new cutting edges at 27 degrees, finished on a wet stone and then stroped on a leather belt.

It took a bit of trial and error, but I soon learned how to set up the cutting edges. Now, I am using alll of these planes in most ever woodworking project.

WOW. I cannot believe how beautiful a well set-up plane will work. I would recommend hand planes to all LJ's
Ira

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Comments

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7,426 Posts
I feel that way after I used the Worksharp sharpening station to sharpen my chisels… well now I see what it is all about… a sharp tool is a joy to use and the Worksharp is so simple and fool proof to use…
 

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Well look at you mister smarty pants. Another old piece o equipment brought back to life.

Great job
 

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118,619 Posts
Nothing like a well tuned plane.thanks for sharing.
 

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Thanks for posting, I've never seen a Stanley No. 95 before. BTKS
 

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Hey, what is the one in the sixth picture. I have one of these, only one blade in mine and it does not have the lever going into the grip area. It caught my eye some years ago but I've never learned much about it. I did actually clean up a rabbit with it one day. Thanks for reminding me it needs attention. BTKS
 

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welcome to the addiction!
 

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The #95 was my 'pocket' plane when I was a finish carpenter. It would do lots of jobs out in the field. I also learned how to use an oil stone to keep it sharp when in the field.

However, after cleaning it up, lapping, and polishing, I got it to return to a level of craftsmanship much higher than I had ever known.

The rabbit plane [#6 picture] was one I was given just a few years ago. I was never able to cut anything until I just completed the finishing/polishing/sharpening. It will never be a 'daily working tool', but will always be a standby for when I need it's special capabilities. And it does a great job, whenever the blade is in the front or rear position.
 

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Blake,
it is an addiction, isn't it? Well, as I said, there is a great reward in the realization that, 'Yes, I Can!!"
 

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that is great Ira!!! When I read the first few lines of your post I was thinking you needed to give Wayne a call because I know they are his passion…maybe next year when we all get together at the Woodshow we can have some demos…!!!
 

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pretty incredible isnt it? I go to a trade school were Im learning how to build and restore wooden boats and the first thing they taught us was how to fix up old planes as well as to hone blades; basically to get any plane in any condition to perfect working order…and this, to me is absolutely one of the first lessons and most important lessons any woodworker can learn. Im drooling over the stanley no 95, ive been looking for one for a while now, i just dont want to cave and buy the lie-nielsen!
 
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